DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Tools (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/)
-   -   Is my new hammer drill broken? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/my-new-hammer-drill-broken-52587/)

darsunt 09-08-2009 08:18 PM

Is my new hammer drill broken?
 
I recently bought a rigid vsr hammer drill. When I run it on hammer setting, I can feel no discernible difference from when it is on drill setting. No sense of any hammering motion at all.

Should this tool be like that? Is the hammering motion to small for me to detect, or should it be obvious? I'm wondering if I should return and exchange this tool as broken.

PaliBob 09-08-2009 08:34 PM

We use the term "Hammer Drill" mostly to describe the lighter duty tools as opposed to the heavier duty "Rotary Hammers" which describes the way they operate.

Hammer drills have an eccentric plate, kind of like a wobble plate behind the armature so that the harder you push on the drill the more hammering action you get.

With No Push then No Hammering

On Rotary Hammers on the other hand more 'Push' does NOT relate to faster drilling.

Note:more info with a better explanation than my "Off the Top" explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer_drill
.

Mr Chips 09-08-2009 09:43 PM

the "Rule of Thumb" is:

if it takes a straight shank bit, you need to push
if it takes a special shank, no need to push

spark plug 09-08-2009 10:09 PM

Difference bet. Hammer drill and Rotary Hammer!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PaliBob (Post 325478)
We use the term "Hammer Drill" mostly to describe the lighter duty tools as opposed to the heavier duty "Rotary Hammers" which describes the way they operate.

Hammer drills have an eccentric plate, kind of like a wobble plate behind the armature so that the harder you push on the drill the more hammering action you get.

With No Push then No Hammering

On Rotary Hammers on the other hand more 'Push' does NOT relate to faster drilling.

Note:more info with a better explanation than my "Off the Top" explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer_drill
.

Thanks, Pali Bob for explaining the way a Hammer/Drill works. I, too own a Ridgid Hammerdrill. I make very good use of it. Never Thought of the process of operation. The WHY part. It's funny. something you use on a daily basis and never think of the way it works...!!! (No matter what) Don't Drink and Drive, Ever!!! (Let's give the Smilies a rest)

darsunt 09-09-2009 12:02 AM

Thanks for the info. I guess the drill is okay.

PaliBob 09-09-2009 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Chips (Post 325517)
the "Rule of Thumb" is:

if it takes a straight shank bit, you need to push
if it takes a special shank, no need to push

Generally true except at least one hammer drill comes with with two chucks.

One of my hammer drills is a Metabo P'7911
It comes with two chucks
One for straight shank bits
One for SDS bits

For Straight shank masonry bits or for SDS bits I need to 'Push'
http://www.acetoolonline.com/Metabo-.../met-p7911.htm
.

Mr Chips 09-09-2009 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PaliBob (Post 325598)
Generally true except ....

that's why it's a "Rule of Thumb" aka: a general guide line

there are always exceptions, but it's generally right more than it's wrong. Kinda like "Rightey tightey, leftie loosey". We both know this does us no good when dealing with old propane regulators, some lawn mower blade retaining bolts, and other items that utilize left hand threads, but for the average homeowner it will rarely let them down

PaliBob 09-09-2009 12:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darsunt (Post 325556)
....... I guess the drill is okay.

You don't have to guess
  • Put in any bit backwards
  • Hold it against anything hard
  • Pull the trigger for a second

Mr Chips 09-09-2009 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PaliBob (Post 325677)

  • Put in any bit backwards
  • Hold it against anything hard
  • Pull the trigger for a second


DON'T do this with a carbide tipped bit.

The carbide is wider than the shank of the bit and you can easily damage a perfectly good bit for no reason

220/221 09-09-2009 08:15 PM

Quote:

When I run it on hammer setting, I can feel no discernible difference from when it is on drill setting
You won't feel it unless you are drilling. If you are drilling and can't feel it, somethings very wrong.:yes: A hammer drill is noisy as hell.

I am assuming hell is noisy BTW.

spark plug 09-09-2009 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 220/221 (Post 325832)
You won't feel it unless you are drilling. If you are drilling and can't feel it, somethings very wrong.:yes: A hammer drill is noisy as hell.

I am assuming hell is noisy BTW.

Sometimes it's QUIET as hell. The SILENCE is deafening, sometimes! I guess that's a topic for another forum.

Mr Chips 09-09-2009 11:19 PM

But we all agree it's HOT:furious:

(except, of course, when it's cold as hell):devil2:

darsunt 09-16-2009 09:47 PM

I've drilled some holes and fixed a post in place. The hammer drill does a great job. But I've noticed some problems.

1) My carbide tipped drills bend quickly (the tip wobbles when you look at it spinning) and become useless. Is this normal, or are the drills bad, or am I doing something wrong?

2) I'm using those blue concrete screws, and I keep snapping off the heads when I drive them in, even when I try to be careful. I tighten them down by hand now. Are those screws weak?

Mr Chips 09-16-2009 10:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darsunt (Post 328615)
I've drilled some holes and fixed a post in place. The hammer drill does a great job. But I've noticed some problems.

1) My carbide tipped drills bend quickly (the tip wobbles when you look at it spinning) and become useless. Is this normal, or are the drills bad, or am I doing something wrong?

2) I'm using those blue concrete screws, and I keep snapping off the heads when I drive them in, even when I try to be careful. I tighten them down by hand now. Are those screws weak?

They are thin, cheap bits, and the hammering action will bend them easily. The SDS concrete screws are usually better, but that doesn't really help you. You probably noticed they are HOT after a couple holes, the heat makes them bend even faster

If your concrete is really hard and has lots of aggregate, you will wear out these cheap bits quickly, rusulting in tighter holes, making it harder to put these in, especially the cheap imports.

How deep are your screws going into the concrete? These blue screws have a max embedment of about 2". they simply don't have the dust removal capabilities to go any deeper. 1-3/4" embedment is ideal.

Remember, if you size your screws for 2" or less in concrete, you will drill your holes faster, wear out bits slower, snap fewer screws, and still get max holding power


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:51 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved