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Old 04-29-2011, 04:21 PM   #16
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Well, I am not aware of any cordless rotary hammer.
Cordless 18 volt hammer drills are common, and work well as all-around units. 36 volt units are now rare, and I think they are being phased out by tool companies in general. Cordless tools are more convenient to use, but more hassle to keep charged. Since you are working inside your house, a corded tool makes more sense to me. There’s more energy available from a home AC outlet than any battery you want to lug around can match.
Yes, but I constantly find myself needing an outlet where I don't have one, thus requiring an extension cable.. when all I really wanted was to drill a single hole.

If my 10.8v could drill into concrete, I'd be set.

And, can I ask you - is using SDS bits necessary for concrete.. or does it just make the work faster? I would like SDS, since it's the best and since "future-proof", but I'm not inpatient.

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Old 04-29-2011, 04:27 PM   #17
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SDS bits are not necessary. You can use masonry bits that are designed for hammer drills. There are also masonry bits that are not able to withstand the hammering, so check the label on any bits you buy.

Regular drills can slowly make holes in concrete.
Hammer drills speed up the process somewhat. You can buy them corded or cordless.
Rotary hammers are by far the fastest way, but only come corded.

I hope this helps,
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Old 04-29-2011, 05:19 PM   #18
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SDS bits are not necessary. You can use masonry bits that are designed for hammer drills. There are also masonry bits that are not able to withstand the hammering, so check the label on any bits you buy.

Regular drills can slowly make holes in concrete.
Hammer drills speed up the process somewhat. You can buy them corded or cordless.
Rotary hammers are by far the fastest way, but only come corded.

I hope this helps,
HomeDepotNewf
Okay, so what do you think - should I spend ~100$ and get the GSB16RE, spend ~200$ and get the GBH 2-26 DFR or try to find a cordless that is as good as the GSB16RE?
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Old 04-29-2011, 09:31 PM   #19
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what size holes are you trying to drill in concrete? If they are small, like 1/4" my guess is your problem is the bits and not the drill. I've drilled plenty of small holes with cheap drills and good bits. It's slow going, and you wear bits out fast, but depending on your usage it might still be more economical to keep the drill you have, even if it means only being able to use 1 bit per hole. The other thought is to simply borrow or rent a small sds hammer when you have multiple holes to drill.

You mention sds is future-proof, but that's really only accurate if in the future you'll be drilling a lot of holes in concrete. Don't get me wrong, it's a great system, but may not make sense for the average homeowner.
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Old 04-30-2011, 04:00 AM   #20
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what size holes are you trying to drill in concrete? If they are small, like 1/4" my guess is your problem is the bits and not the drill. I've drilled plenty of small holes with cheap drills and good bits. It's slow going, and you wear bits out fast, but depending on your usage it might still be more economical to keep the drill you have, even if it means only being able to use 1 bit per hole. The other thought is to simply borrow or rent a small sds hammer when you have multiple holes to drill.

You mention sds is future-proof, but that's really only accurate if in the future you'll be drilling a lot of holes in concrete. Don't get me wrong, it's a great system, but may not make sense for the average homeowner.
I didn't think about that one.

I bought a few multi-construction bits, after being told they'd be good for concrete.. but I never tested them on my current drill because I didn't have luck with any other bits. The drill itself claims it could drill through concrete.. maybe it really was just the bit.

When I say "future-proof", I mean that, as far as I know, the GBH 2-26 DFR.. could do practically any task that a drill can do. So, there is no chance that at some point I will encounter something that I'll have to buy a new drill for.
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Old 04-30-2011, 08:59 PM   #21
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When I say "future-proof", I mean that, as far as I know, the GBH 2-26 DFR.. could do practically any task that a drill can do. So, there is no chance that at some point I will encounter something that I'll have to buy a new drill for.
I'm confused.... When you say it could do practically any task that a drill can do, do you mean drill small-med holes in concrete? Because that's all it can do, and all it was designed to do ( other than some light duty chiseling). You aren't going to be able to use it to drill into any other base material
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Old 05-01-2011, 02:37 PM   #22
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I'm confused.... When you say it could do practically any task that a drill can do, do you mean drill small-med holes in concrete? Because that's all it can do, and all it was designed to do ( other than some light duty chiseling). You aren't going to be able to use it to drill into any other base material
But it can drill everything else besides large holes in concrete, right?

That's the only thing I won't do.
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Old 05-03-2011, 10:29 PM   #23
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But it can drill everything else besides large holes in concrete, right?

That's the only thing I won't do.
You need to define "everything else". an SDS drill is simply a delivery system for SDS concrete bits, that's it. You could buy an adapter to use standard bits, which is fine for straight shank masonry bits, but the low rpms on this drill ( and others like it) make it ineffiecient on most other base materials

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Old 05-04-2011, 04:31 AM   #24
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You need to define "everything else". an SDS drill is simply a delivery system for SDS concrete bits, that's it. You could buy an adapter to use standard bits, which is fine for straight shank masonry bits, but the low rpms on this drill ( and others like it) make it ineffiecient on most other base materials

So does that mean that the GSB16RE would actually be better at everything besides drilling into concrete?

And does that really matter, considering that concrete is the most difficult thing to drill into?
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:38 AM   #25
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So does that mean that the GSB16RE would actually be better at everything besides drilling into concrete?
YES. Not to mention that it's more compact, which will allow you to get into much tighter spaces vs the other one.

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And does that really matter, considering that concrete is the most difficult thing to drill into?
Not all concrete is the same. Some are very soft and are easily drilled, others like really old concrete with lots of aggregrate ( stone) in the mix are sometimes darn near impossible.

Unless you are regularly drilling holes in concrete or are a guy who just likes to own tools, I think I'd recommend holding off on the SDS and just trying better quality bits
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Old 05-04-2011, 08:48 AM   #26
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YES. Not to mention that it's more compact, which will allow you to get into much tighter spaces vs the other one.



Not all concrete is the same. Some are very soft and are easily drilled, others like really old concrete with lots of aggregrate ( stone) in the mix are sometimes darn near impossible.

Unless you are regularly drilling holes in concrete or are a guy who just likes to own tools, I think I'd recommend holding off on the SDS and just trying better quality bits
Is it possible that my walls have some sort of metal in them? The reason I want the GBH is because there are certain places where my drill simply won't go through.

But wow, you're right. GBH - 900 RPMs; GSB - 3,000 RPMs(!)

Now, I want the GSB16RE in cordless form and I'm done!
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:07 AM   #27
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Is it possible that my walls have some sort of metal in them
If you are talking about concrete walls, you are probably hitting rebar. They do make rebar cutting bits for SDS, but usually only in the bigger diameters if i remember correctly. They are expensive, and you'll ruin them quickly if you forget to switch out of roto-hammer mode, or if you go through the rebar and start into the concrete
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:55 AM   #28
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If you are talking about concrete walls, you are probably hitting rebar. They do make rebar cutting bits for SDS, but usually only in the bigger diameters if i remember correctly. They are expensive, and you'll ruin them quickly if you forget to switch out of roto-hammer mode, or if you go through the rebar and start into the concrete
But I'm not getting an SDS drill, because I need an all-around drill.

I also need something that drills small holes (up to 10mm).

So, if you can recommend a cordless version of the GSB16RE, that would be perfect.
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Old 05-04-2011, 11:55 AM   #29
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I would recommend this. http://www.tools-plus.com/makita-bhp452hw.html dorf dude...
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Old 05-04-2011, 02:01 PM   #30
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I would recommend this. http://www.tools-plus.com/makita-bhp452hw.html dorf dude...
I've always liked Makita as well

if your budget allows step up to this one for the extra torque
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

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