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Old 11-07-2013, 10:28 PM   #1
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


Don't know anyone else has been hurt using their small M12 Milwaukee drill but I sure was yesterday.
I was holding the chuck in place while installing a bit and the knurled surface of the chuck grabbed the webbing between my thumb and index finger and wedged it under the plastic cover the goes over part of the chuck. It ripped all the skin off. The pain was excruciating. Good thing the homeowner wasn't there to hear me scream. I would have taught them a few 4 letter words they probably never heard before. Really looks like a dangerous design flaw.

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Old 11-07-2013, 10:37 PM   #2
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


I thought you weren't supposed to do it that way "technically". I know we all do. Hope you heal well, that's a sucky place to have to rebuild all your skin!

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Old 11-08-2013, 12:15 AM   #3
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


Thanks for the response.
I don't know how else to tighten a drill bit in a keyless chuck but if there is another, safer way please share. I'm not fond of having to pull my own flesh out of a drill while bleeding profusely.
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:51 AM   #4
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


An ouchie like that warrants inventing new cuss words!
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Old 11-08-2013, 07:59 AM   #5
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


I don't really understand what the design flaw is, don't all of those keyless chucks have a gap between the part you hold and the spinning part? Is the Milwaukee one just particularly big?
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:33 AM   #6
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


My have just been a perfect storm of grabbing it in the wrong spot.
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:34 AM   #7
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


I've not done what you described, but, I sure mangled my hands up when a spade bit gets bogged down and catches in the wood and twist the drill, slamming the drill and your hand against the piece or pieces you are working on……..painful.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:36 AM   #8
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


I have keyless chuck drills too. I use the trigger to close the chuck enough to hold the bit. If you twist the forward part of the chick with the drill off, it locks and and you can turn it as tight as you need it.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:43 PM   #9
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


It's hard to describe how it's designed so all I can say is there is a small gap between the spinning chuck and the body of the drill. It's just enough to pull loose flesh into the gap as the knurled chuck tears it to pieces all within a micro second.
The biggest problem is that I'm trying to tighten the bits as much as possible. They seem to always come loose while I'm drilling that's why I've been holding onto the chuck while pulling the trigger.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:44 PM   #10
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


Quote:
Originally Posted by PoleCat
An ouchie like that warrants inventing new cuss words!
That's a cuss word?? Wish I could use that instead of the other things I said. Guess I need to practice that one for future injuries.
Thanks a lot!
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:50 PM   #11
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu
I've not done what you described, but, I sure mangled my hands up when a spade bit gets bogged down and catches in the wood and twist the drill, slamming the drill and your hand against the piece or pieces you are working on……..painful.
That has happened to me as well on numerous occasions.
Kens rule of law: (that's me)
The odds of a high torque drill twisting your hands against an object are in direct proportion to the sharpness of that object.
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Old 11-08-2013, 03:19 PM   #12
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


And working with a dull hole saw in a tight spot is a great way to find out what a Makita battery pack tastes like... Not that I would know

On the actual subject, I admit I pretty much always tighten the chuck on my Makita drill "under power" but it's never grabbed me. There's a pretty wide gap on this drill though, probably 3/16" or so. Might also have to do with the position of your hand, too.
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:03 PM   #13
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Injured using milwaukee cordless


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave88LX View Post
I have keyless chuck drills too. I use the trigger to close the chuck enough to hold the bit. If you twist the forward part of the chick with the drill off, it locks and and you can turn it as tight as you need it.
I do as this guy suggests. You can get the bit way tighter this way. Also, if you don't want to bump or twist your wrist when hole sawing, why not use that handy side handle that comes in almost every kit (that always gets lost because you don't use it).

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