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-   -   Good inexpensive 10" miter saw for a DIY'ER??/ (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/good-inexpensive-10-miter-saw-diyer-3754/)

Sellncars 09-01-2006 09:42 PM

Good inexpensive 10" miter saw for a DIY'ER??/
 
Hello guys,

I'm looking for a good inexpensive 10" miter saw for my home. I don't do alot of carpentry, but would like to get more involved. This unit will be pretty much used for mouldings, some shelving and such. I see that Craftsman has a 10" miter saw with a laser on sale for $99.00, would you buy a craftsman or another manufacturer? I have had some good luck and some bad with Craftsman Power tools in the past.

slickshift 09-01-2006 10:07 PM

Though I love and swear by my 70's Craftsman Radial Arm Saw, and have some other Craftsman tools of good quality, any name Miter Saw for $100 will be barely good enough for rough cuts on decks and such
I seriously doubt your interior molding project will go smoothly with that saw

I understand it's for occasional use, that's not the issue
The under $200 Miters don't cut straight enough (and can't be adjusted correctly), or smoothly enough for the relatively delicate molding jobs

joasis 09-01-2006 10:25 PM

WhenI first went out on my own, I bought a Lowes special, a Delta 10 inch saw, and it has been pretty decent..we still use it as a back up...cost $99 bucks.....If you ever use a good 12" saw, you will never go back...but the Delta will work as a HO saw. Remember though, you can't cut very wide stock..so your shelves would be narrow.

LanterDan 09-01-2006 11:34 PM

Slickshift, I not sure I entirely agree with you. I’ve used my dad’s dirt cheap Pro-Tec miter saw to install trim before, and while I can’t say I like the saw, I think you can make it work if you have the patience. I can say that with a cheap saw you never trust any the saws readouts so you have to measure all the setting yourself, and check them often. And you have to get used to annoying things having the saw move when you tighten anything (you learn to anticipate how much). It also forces you to make as many cuts as you can at one setting before changing it, which is probably a good practice to get into anyway. Then again, maybe my trim work is just crummier than I realize. It probably helps that I learned from my grandfather’s using his backsaw and miter box.
I can certainly see why it would make no sense to put with tools like this in a situation where time was money. But it seems like the once advantage a DIYer has over a pro is time, especially since they presumably wouldn’t do it themselves if they didn’t enjoy it. Still, when I get my own saw I will definitely get something better, I’m just not sure how much better yet.

Kennedy 09-02-2006 08:32 AM

If you are buying a cheap saw for trimwork, the first thing you need to do when you get home is throw the blade in the trash and buy a decent trim blade.

slickshift 09-02-2006 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LanterDan
I canít say I like the saw
....you can make it work if you have the patience.
....never trust any the saws readouts
....measure all the setting yourself, and check them often.
...you have to get used to annoying things having the saw move when you tighten anything
....make as many cuts as you can at one setting before changing it,

Actually, rather than disagreeing with me, you detailed my point perfectly
That's the stuff you can avoid with a better saw
Quote:

Originally Posted by LanterDan
...maybe my trim work is just crummier than I realize.

It's not supossed to be that bad
With a better saw it would be cake

Sellncars 09-02-2006 06:59 PM

What do you guys think of used equipment or refurbished off of Ebay?

Dewalt, makita, etc, etc....What should i look for?

slickshift 09-02-2006 08:35 PM

I'd definitely consider used or reconditioned for an occasional use tool
Even for an often used one depending on what it is

The re-conditioned should be factory reconditioned and have some sort of factory warranty

Used....not sure I'd do that on line...w/o laying an eyeball on it

I'd generally prefer to purchase a recon at a store also, in case something goes on it
But wouldn't have a problem purchasing one online from a trusted vendor

DeWalt and Bosch I know would fit your needs
Makita saws, I never had any
I'm sure they are good though

I'll try and find my Workbench review of the 10" miters
It's around here somewhere.....

LanterDan 09-02-2006 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickshift
It's not supossed to be that bad
With a better saw it would be cake

I was just joking with that "crummier than I think" line, I actually think my trim work is pretty good. I enjoy it too, and no it doesn't take me forever. Not that I'm fast enough at it to make money, but that is not my goal. But there is not question a better saw would help, as would a finish nailer (just put a huge hammer bash in a peice of baseboard yesterday :( ).

Anyway I was just trying to detail some of the issues one must deal with when using a low end saw (which I still maintain can be delt with, even if they are a pain).

I have used several factory reconditioned tools (no miter saw though) without problem, so I wouldn't be afraid to go that way if you found a deal. I have also seen people try to sell of recondished equipment at prices not much different from brand new.

This may be obvious, and maybe you've tried, but see if you can borrow a saw from someone. Even if you only did it once it will give you some idea of what you should look for and what you can tolerate. Maybe I've just got the young single lots of friends thing going for me, but my friends and I trade tools around quite a bit when we have different projects going on. This also explains why I am sometimes in the position of using a tool I would never buy myself, but will put up with if I have access to it for free. Being a grad student probably has something to with that do, although now that I'm finished and just got an offer for a real job this week hopefully I can start using more real tools.

Kennedy is right too; don't wast your time with a bad (or the wrong) blade. The two areas I've found where you absolutely can't skimp are measurement and layout, and cutting tools (bits, blades). This probably explains why I own a set of router bits but not a router, and owned a set of drill bits long before owning a drill.

slickshift 09-03-2006 05:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickshift (Post 17344)
I'll try and find my Workbench review of the 10" miters
It's around here somewhere.....

They seemed to like the Bosch and Makitas best
They didn't test the DeWalt (? pretty common saw ?)
Although it's not a Bosch (the cream), I can recommend it for just about any use
The Bosch is a little over-featured for most DIYers...and most Pros...but it's a "regret-proof purchase"
There's none better
It'll work well if you are building a deck or making picture frames

slickshift 09-03-2006 05:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LanterDan (Post 17346)
Anyway I was just trying to detail some of the issues one must deal with when using a low end saw (which I still maintain can be delt with, even if they are a pain).

You did a pretty good job of it
Yes, they can be dealt with
I have (had) some and you described them to a "T"
They can be dealt with (and some I still deal with)
But I can't in good conscience recommend them
If they are frustrating for an experienced person, they would be killer for a DIYer
Save the money up for a good one, or rent or borrow a good one

J187 09-07-2006 08:21 AM

I have a friend who owns his own handyman company. He owns this saw here

http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS...4+3966&pos=n24


I received as a gift, the $199 Ryobi 12" compound miter saw.

John swears my Ryobi saw feels and cuts MUCH better than his $400 dewalt. I do not have experience enough with different saws to compare, I wouldn't expect the cheaper RYobi to compare favorably with the other saws, although John is convinced it does, but I will say I have been perfectly happy with it and although I have yet to cut very detailed moldings, it has been perfect for simpler baseboard molding and window and door trim.

billinak 09-07-2006 11:58 AM

I've got a Rigid 10" saw, about $179 at HD, works great for me, feels very solid and cuts just fine with the new blade I got. The only thing is the limited width of boards you can cut, but with a little practice you can flip the board and cut it straight every time.

KUIPORNG 09-07-2006 01:36 PM

I like to join this hot discussions even I haven't read all of it yet... I use one called Mastercraft model, which is a much less quality one in terms of brand name comparing to craftsman. It is doing great job for me... to be honest, I don't really see the different for good or bad cut, a cut is a cut, choping 2x4 wood studs cut, how can it be bad? you mean with some left over wood on the cutting area?... don't think that would happen for any saw qualify to be named saw... so my opinion, is for DIYers,... as long as the power don't get short circuit,,, it is a good buy... go for it...

after reading more,.. my experience only limited to cut 2x4 so far... so may be there is difference when cutting detail moulding... but I would think the blade itself play a more important role then the saw itself... still, moulding is thin pine only...

KUIPORNG 09-07-2006 01:42 PM

I defintely a Ebay supporter
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sellncars (Post 17341)
What do you guys think of used equipment or refurbished off of Ebay?

Dewalt, makita, etc, etc....What should i look for?


Although, I really don't want to convince you here to increase my competition on bidding...

For above questions, you have to see your luck... but when you do an average, I say you will save a lot of money overall...100% 200%...etc..


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