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-   -   Drill to mix thinset (http://www.diychatroom.com/f29/drill-mix-thinset-6046/)

dbrew 01-21-2007 02:41 PM

Drill to mix thinset
 
Doing a tile job in the bathroom and mixing the thinset by hand is a pain so I bought a mixer to go on a drill. My drill is a small drill for most home projects. It will not handle mixing thinset as I found out when it started smelling like it was burning up.

Any recomendations of a drill or size drill I would need for this job of mixing thins set with an attachment that looks like a large beater?

Thanks for any advice.

ron schenker 01-21-2007 04:17 PM

This would be a good time to invest in an 18 volt cordless drill:thumbsup:
I use my Dewalt for thinset and grout mixing all the time with no problems. You'll find 100's of other uses for it and wonder how you lived without it:)

majakdragon 01-22-2007 09:01 AM

The initial mixing of thinset (more dry than wet) puts a lot of pressure on a drill motor. I burnt up a cheap 1/2" drill doing this. You really need a drill with ample power to complete this task. Good luck.

dbrew 01-22-2007 03:39 PM

How much is ample power or a minimum I should look for?

I like the cordless option mentioned because I see many uses after this job. Can the batteries take that kind of use? I worry a little the battery may break down quickly. Ron, any issues with the battery? It sounds like you may use it very often for many jobs.

Thanks

billinak 01-22-2007 04:44 PM

I picked up a 19.2 volt Craftsman cordless from Sears with two batteries for $99. I've mixed mortar, grout, and drywall mud for several projects and it works great, especially on a fresh battery. This is my second craftsman cordless and I've been very happy with both of them.

dougrus 01-22-2007 05:13 PM

For mixing thinset, I suggest a good 1/2" drill. I bought a dewault spade handle drill specifically for this purpose. It plows through thinset without breaking a sweat. 3/8" drills will have a tendency to burn out after some time and even if it doesnt burn out I would be hesitent to put that much wear and tear on it.
The burly paddle bits are mostly 1/2" from what I have seen anyway...
I have also been able to use it for more intense drilling situations as well so it has proved a good investment.

ron schenker 01-22-2007 07:13 PM

Quote:

Ron, any issues with the battery? It sounds like you may use it very often for many jobs.
None whatsoever:thumbup:

Mr. Michael 01-22-2007 09:27 PM

aww come on, time to give those forearms a good honest workout.;)

KUIPORNG 01-23-2007 10:44 AM

I bought a used Craftsman 1/2" drill (corded) from Ebay and it's been working no problem for many mixes... but I think cordless offer the advantageous that you don't get electric shock by accident... although I never get one, there is still a danger as normally the drill work close by water of some sort... but I am kind of sick and tire of recharging batteries... to me... that is additional work...

ron schenker 01-23-2007 06:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 30953)
I bought a used Craftsman 1/2" drill (corded) from Ebay and it's been working no problem for many mixes... but I think cordless offer the advantageous that you don't get electric shock by accident... although I never get one, there is still a danger as normally the drill work close by water of some sort... but I am kind of sick and tire of recharging batteries... to me... that is additional work...

That's funny...you have lots of energy to finish your own basement but charging batteries is additional work:laughing:
I hate fumbling around with extension cords, compressors, and hoses. I wish all my power tools were cordless and airless:yes:

KUIPORNG 01-24-2007 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ron schenker (Post 31012)
That's funny...you have lots of energy to finish your own basement but charging batteries is additional work:laughing:
I hate fumbling around with extension cords, compressors, and hoses. I wish all my power tools were cordless and airless:yes:

putting the battery into the charger is, in deed, not require a lot of physical strength, but if you consider this:

- try to locate the charger which is among the 20 chargers in your tool box

- when working on the tool and worries about battery will soon finishing up and feeling those weak strength from the tool... it is like driving a car with the tank point to empty and trying to locate a gas station which is completely out of sight...

- when almost done with the job and the battery went out and you have to wait for another hour or so and the mud will dry up probably...

- and try to store those batteries in room temperature and keeping track of which batteries is good which is not so good which is bad and find way to dispose the bad for env sake... is like another management job besides your day job...

and that is normal to cause sick and tire... isn't it...

dbrew 01-24-2007 10:28 PM

Well, I will most likely go with a cordless Craftsman 19.2v hammer drill, model 11543. I have a stone house and lots of concrete around so the hammer drill may come in handy down the road. Also it will be on sale from $129.99 to $99.99 this Sunday and with a $10 off coupon that looks like it will apply, it is a low risk option. I still have my corded which will handle most long term jobs if the batteries run out. BTW, I'd use my forearms but my joints still say no way:)

If you have heard any bad about the Craftsman let me know. I'm a DYIer but not too many major jobs and Craftsman usually handles what I do.

Thanks for the advice.

KUIPORNG 02-26-2007 03:14 PM

It is my turn...My 1/2" craftsman is burned. Now out in the market for another one... this time I need it fast because got to finish the tiles before moving the washer/dryer on Sunday... now I spot this guy

Mileuwakee 1/2" Magnum....

anyone has experience with this guy? it cost me $149.99 plus tax from HD...

AtlanticWBConst. 02-26-2007 03:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 34856)
It is my turn...My 1/2" craftsman is burned. Now out in the market for another one... this time I need it fast because got to finish the tiles before moving the washer/dryer on Sunday... now I spot this guy

Mileuwakee 1/2" Magnum....

anyone has experience with this guy? it cost me $149.99 plus tax from HD...

Key is that you want a minimum of at least 6 to 7 amps or higher....if you plan on using it to mix any kinds of materials...

KUIPORNG 02-26-2007 03:18 PM

THANKS , I guess it is ok then because it said 8 amps..


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