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Old 03-10-2009, 09:57 PM   #1
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craftsman 19.2V power tools


Are craftsman 19.2 Volt power tools any good? has anyone owned these? how do they compare to dewalt 18 volt?

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Old 03-11-2009, 12:12 AM   #2
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craftsman 19.2V power tools


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Originally Posted by howitt View Post
Are craftsman 19.2 Volt power tools any good? has anyone owned these? how do they compare to dewalt 18 volt?
IMO the Craftsman 19.2V power tools provides similar performance and value as Ryobi. Both are great DIY choices with affordable batteries and have a wide range of power tools that use their respective battery system. Dewalts XRP lineup have more torque, speed and build quality at greater cost. The "lower" line 18V Dewalts probably provide similar performance to the craftsman/ryobi. In a few reviews the 20V Li Craftsman have performed very well compared to the professional brands.

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Old 03-11-2009, 12:41 AM   #3
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Craftsman cordless tools are in no way on par with DeWalt cordless tools in my opinion. You pay a lot for the DeWalt name, but the quality is definitely there. Craftsman is just fine for most DIYers, but you won't see professionals using them very often at all. That speaks to their quality.
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Old 03-11-2009, 07:25 AM   #4
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The Craftsman tools are good tools for occasional users. If you just want them for weekend projects, they will meet your needs, and should last a good while. As noted previously, if stacked up against the pro tools, they will probably fall down on power and durability.

Just note; many Craftsman (Sears) and Ryobi (Home Depot) tools are made by the same manufacturer, and in many cases, the tools are almost identical. However they do not take the same batteries, so you can't mix and match.

Both lines carry a lot of tools which work off the same batteries. Once you get a few tools, you will almost certainly get more. Having only one battery type to mess with makes things very simple.

Both Craftsman and Ryobi have their advantages, and each has tools in their line the other doesn't have. The Ryobi tools have some outdoor tools you can get (hedger, pole pruner, chain saw, blower, etc), while the Craftsman has a radio with AM (Ryobi radio only has FM), and the Craftsman line has the flourescent light (Ryobi does market the same one; but not in the US).
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Old 03-11-2009, 07:25 PM   #5
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I have both.

Bought the Craftsman kit several years ago on sale and IMO it works for what it was made for. A perfect example of why good tools cost more. Not that there is anything wrong with the C 19.2 for DIY. Note- the new 19.2 batteries will not fit the old 19.2 tools. However, the 14.4v units are not worth the space they take up in a toolbox. No power at all. I know, that's not what the thread is but since I have used both, I will offer that comparison as a special offer if you read this in the next 30 minutes.

I also have a DeWalt 18v at the shop- drill and reciprocating saw. I like both. Good power for what I have used either of them for so far.

But I really would like to get the Rigid kit with recip saw, hammer drill, impact driver, etc. If I could just leave my bifocals under the pillow for the tooth fairy and get $500!
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Old 03-12-2009, 10:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Craftsman cordless tools are in no way on par with DeWalt cordless tools in my opinion. You pay a lot for the DeWalt name, but the quality is definitely there. Craftsman is just fine for most DIYers, but you won't see professionals using them very often at all. That speaks to their quality.
I agree, the only time you see professionals using them is on TV because they are usually one of the sponsors of the show.

I am not a professional, but I am a pretty serious DIYer, I spend the extra money on quality tools just because they make the job that much more enjoyable. Having the correct quality tool makes the job that much easier.
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Old 03-14-2009, 03:05 AM   #7
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I would go for the Craftsman 11588. I am more experienced than the majority of tool users on the forum. I have the DeWalt 18V line, the Panasonic 14.4 Li-Ion line and Bosh 10.4 tools.

Attached is a shot of the CR review. They rate it a Best Buy @ a score of 66 where the other cordless drills in the Test ranged from a high of 88 down to a low of 28. These are all from big name brands.

I still have a monster ½" Craftsman corded drill that I bought in 1962. That was when most drills were ¼"

Drifting further from the original post., my very first power tool was a ¼" Craftsman drill that I bought from the Sears catalog while I was a US Army draftee stationed in 1959 Germany that cost me over a week of Army pay.

This was before anybody heard of Vietnam so I was part of the 180,000 US force in Germany waiting for WW III to start. I was a Private about to be promoted to PFC because I had come in first in my Army training as our 155 Artillery Battery's Fire Direction Center (FDC) Specialist. When our unit arrived in Germany in December 1958 we took over the all the 155 self propelled howitzers and the tracked APC armored personnel carriers of the unit that we replaced.

One of the APC's was the FDC's and since we didn't have an FDC Sergeant our First Sergeant had me take over all the responsibility for the APC and related tools and maintenance equipment by signing a 640 item inventory log. That meant that I was responsible for not only for not losing gear but also for all of it passing inspections.


Our little FDC had an APC driver, Two Telephone operators and me. We all had the same FDC training but since I was the Specialist, I was nominally in charge (no rank), although we were all drafted at the same time. We all worked together to pass inspections whose toughest challenge was to keep all the APC maintenance tools free of rust. All the tools, wrenches and sockets were a flat black finish (no shiny chrome) so working in the wet snow they quickly attracted a patina of rust. The only way to get rid of the rust was with gobs of Army issued steel wool. What a drag.

There had to be an easier way. I went over to the PX and checked through their copy of the Sears catalog and found my salvation in a ¼” corded drill with a wire wheel brush and lamb’s wool bonnet attachments. It took three weeks to arrive by ship (this was before jets) but there was no problem with power because we had 120 VAC on Base.
Nobody on the Base had any power tools so there was quite a stir when word got out on my new treasure.

The Machine Gun Sergeant first made a deal with me that he would take over all maintenance and cleaning of my APC’s 50 caliber machine gun to let him borrow the drill with the polishing bonnet for polishing carbine stocks in the Weapons Room. Plus he knew I liked to shoot the 45 caliber M3 grease guns, so he put me on his M3 practice list.


The First Sergeant was also impressed with my initiative he made me exempt from KP and Guard duty after the drill arrived and then made me the first PFC in our group of draftees.

That was a great Drill.
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Old 03-14-2009, 01:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaliBob View Post
I would go for the Craftsman 11588. I am more experienced than the majority of tool users on the forum. I have the DeWalt 18V line, the Panasonic 14.4 Li-Ion line and Bosh 10.4 tools.

Attached is a shot of the CR review. They rate it a Best Buy @ a score of 66 where the other cordless drills in the Test ranged from a high of 88 down to a low of 28. These are all from big name brands.

I still have a monster ½" Craftsman corded drill that I bought in 1962. That was when most drills were ¼"

Drifting further from the original post., my very first power tool was a ¼" Craftsman drill that I bought from the Sears catalog while I was a US Army draftee stationed in 1959 Germany that cost me over a week of Army pay.

This was before anybody heard of Vietnam so I was part of the 180,000 US force in Germany waiting for WW III to start. I was a Private about to be promoted to PFC because I had come in first in my Army training as our 155 Artillery Battery's Fire Direction Center (FDC) Specialist. When our unit arrived in Germany in December 1958 we took over the all the 155 self propelled howitzers and the tracked APC armored personnel carriers of the unit that we replaced.

One of the APC's was the FDC's and since we didn't have an FDC Sergeant our First Sergeant had me take over all the responsibility for the APC and related tools and maintenance equipment by signing a 640 item inventory log. That meant that I was responsible for not only for not losing gear but also for all of it passing inspections.

Our little FDC had an APC driver, Two Telephone operators and me. We all had the same FDC training but since I was the Specialist, I was nominally in charge (no rank), although we were all drafted at the same time. We all worked together to pass inspections whose toughest challenge was to keep all the APC maintenance tools free of rust. All the tools, wrenches and sockets were a flat black finish (no shiny chrome) so working in the wet snow they quickly attracted a patina of rust. The only way to get rid of the rust was with gobs of Army issued steel wool. What a drag.

There had to be an easier way. I went over to the PX and checked through their copy of the Sears catalog and found my salvation in a ¼” corded drill with a wire wheel brush and lamb’s wool bonnet attachments. It took three weeks to arrive by ship (this was before jets) but there was no problem with power because we had 120 VAC on Base.
Nobody on the Base had any power tools so there was quite a stir when word got out on my new treasure.

The Machine Gun Sergeant first made a deal with me that he would take over all maintenance and cleaning of my APC’s 50 caliber machine gun to let him borrow the drill with the polishing bonnet for polishing carbine stocks in the Weapons Room. Plus he knew I liked to shoot the 45 caliber M3 grease guns, so he put me on his M3 practice list.

The First Sergeant was also impressed with my initiative he made me exempt from KP and Guard duty after the drill arrived and then made me the first PFC in our group of draftees.

That was a great Drill.
Fist of all thank you for your service. I am also a veteran that was in the Army toward the end of the Vietnam war, although I never went to Vietnam.

You made the above statement I highlighted without really giving any qualifications for doing so. If you are talking about your military experience almost fifty years ago I do not see how that is relevant.

Are you, or were you a professional tradesman? By making such a statement you are implying that you are more qualified than anyone else to give your opinion. There have only been five of use to reply to this thread. Do you know any of us or what our backgrounds are? You may well have more experience than all five of us put together, (but I doubt it). However I do not see how that makes you more qualified.

Tools have change dramatically in the past ten years not to mention fifty. Fifty years ago Craftsman quality was a top priority. While quality is still somewhat of a concern for Sears, I believe price is more of a concern as they will frequently change suppliers based on low bid.

I have owned a few Craftsman power tools and they are OK, just a minor step above Black and Decker IMHO.

Back to the OP question, are Craftsman power tools any good? - They are alright.

Has anyone owned these? - No, but I have used them and prefer Dewalt or Ridged.

How do they compare to Dewalt? - Already made my OPINION clear.

The OP will have to determine if the extra cost of a professional quality drill is worth it to them. Any drill is OK if you only need it to drill a couple of holes, but if you are planing on using it all day long (such as screwing down deck boards) for more than one or two projects. I would recommend more of a professional model.

That being said, have a nice day.
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Old 03-14-2009, 07:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokenknee View Post
You made the above statement I highlighted without really giving any qualifications for doing so. If you are talking about your military experience almost fifty years ago I do not see how that is relevant.

Are you, or were you a professional tradesman? By making such a statement you are implying that you are more qualified than anyone else to give your opinion. There have only been five of use to reply to this thread. Do you know any of us or what our backgrounds are? You may well have more experience than all five of us put together, (but I doubt it). However I do not see how that makes you more qualified.

That being said, have a nice day.
Sorry to offend but when when I said
Quote:
I am more experienced than the majority of tool users on the forum
I was referring to the whole DIY population not in any way to the responders to this thread. When I said
Quote:
I would go for the Craftsman 11588
I was clearly giving my personal opinion without adding any adjectives. I was responding to the original question.

That said I'll admit to being an old curmudgeon although I don't consider myself ill tempered. Check my profile

Again I am not in any way implying that I am more qualified in any way, although my whole history has been tied to tools both professionally and personally.
Note to Howitt: Let us know what you decide

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Old 03-19-2009, 10:15 AM   #10
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craftsman 19.2V power tools


I've had a variety of battery powered drills over the years. Craftsman quality and ruggedness is probably down, compared to some of the other brands. But so is the price. And in today's economy, that's important to a DIY who will likely never see just how much his drill can take.

Frankly, although they do seem to last, DeWalt is highly over-rated in my opinion. Most of their tools are awkward feeling to me, and they are just about all way too heavy. The 19.2 Craftsman probably has to be one of the best balanced tools I've ever used.

I have used my present Craftsman 19.2 (and it's earlier little brother, the 14.4) for about 8 or ten years now. No new batteries, no repairs, no problems, and I only got the 19.2 because someone stole the 14.4.

Although my tools are used on the job daily, year in and year out, I do have to admit that I'm probably easier on my tools than most other contractors I see working around me. For instance, my Craftsman is used for what it was made for. I break out my corded Skil Xtra Tool for hammer drilling. And I have a couple of screwguns for drywall work. I don't mix mud with it. That's what the 1/2" angle Milwaukee is for.

Almost all the Craftsman is used for is cabinet installation and door and window installation. And, for me, it outperforms any other tool I've tried.
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Old 03-19-2009, 02:33 PM   #11
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.......I don't mix mud with it. That's what the 1/2" angle Milwaukee is for........
Here is my Craftsman Industrial rated 1960's Mud Mixer. I assembled the Heathkit Speed Controller in the 60's because the Craftsman has only one speed, Fwd and rev.

The black plastic case is also original. The cheapo plastic hinges are long gone so I use a bungee cord to hold it together.

The Heathkit controller is also ancient. It uses two SCR's because Triacs were still not commonly available. One SCR was used to switch the positive half of the sine wave and the second SCR the negative.
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Old 03-19-2009, 08:42 PM   #12
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Bob-
That is just WAY COOL! Or should I say GROOVY!
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Old 03-20-2009, 08:04 PM   #13
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after reading the posts I am thinking of buying a dewalt cordless tool set. I was curious of peoples opinions because I was thinking that dewalt is just better marketed.
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Old 03-21-2009, 03:04 AM   #14
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Howitt, You should have good luck with the 18V DeWalts. I bought the 18V set Circ Saw, Recip, Hammer Drill, & Light when they first came out and have been happy with them. After going through three sets of batteries (old age) the advice I'll give is don't buy any cheap Chinese replacement batteries. I bought a set, and they didn't last three months.

For replacement batteries I take the mine down to Batteries Plus in Culver City. They open the battery case take out the old battery cells and weld in a new set of 3000mAh cells cheaper and better than the originals.

http://www.batteriesplus.com/t-storeloc.aspx
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Last edited by PaliBob; 03-21-2009 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Typo 300mAh s/b 3000mAh
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Old 03-21-2009, 08:34 AM   #15
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300mAh? Did you mean 3000mAh? Also curious, did the batteries packs originally have NiMh installed? or were they NiCd?

If you did switch the battery type did you have to change your charger?

The reason I ask is I started rebuilding my own battery packs about a year ago, I have also rebuilt some for friends and relatives. I have been rebuilding the packs with the 2200NiCd batteries with tabs from http://www.batteryspace.com/index.as...ROD&ProdID=162.

I have thought about using the NiMh for the higher capacity available, but have been told (on the web) that the older chargers will not work with the NiMh because of the internal chemistry of the battery will not allow the charger to detect when to properly start or terminate the charge.

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