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Old 01-19-2012, 09:04 PM   #16
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The basics of the hammer


i with you guys on the estwing topic.. i started out using them but cant stand the damn things now... for framing i use a 14 oz wood handle stilletto. for general carpentry including finish work i use a japanese nailing hammer from lee valley

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Old 01-19-2012, 10:13 PM   #17
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The basics of the hammer


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Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk
i with you guys on the estwing topic.. i started out using them but cant stand the damn things now... for framing i use a 14 oz wood handle stilletto. for general carpentry including finish work i use a japanese nailing hammer from lee valley
That's what I've been talking about, the 14oz titanium. A lot of people don't realize how powerful of a swing you can get with something so light.
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Old 01-20-2012, 03:37 PM   #18
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The basics of the hammer


Love my Estwing.

But use it mostly as a ripping/demo tool. Don't hammer many nails these days.

That's what nail guns are for, aren't they?
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Old 01-20-2012, 03:39 PM   #19
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The basics of the hammer


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Originally Posted by itin1200
Love my Estwing.

But use it mostly as a ripping/demo tool. Don't hammer many nails these days.

That's what nail guns are for, aren't they?
Can I ask...how old are you?
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Old 01-20-2012, 03:47 PM   #20
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The basics of the hammer


Haha.

I'm 45. Spent my life as a journalist, then went to nursing school.

Have been a trauma nurse for almost 6 years.

Avid DIYer, not a pro in any way.

And yes, I agree with the posts about the Estwing. Have had it for almost 15 years, but anymore I don't really use it for hammering.
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Old 01-20-2012, 03:50 PM   #21
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The basics of the hammer


Quote:
Originally Posted by itin1200
Haha.

I'm 45. Spent my life as a journalist, then went to nursing school.

Have been a trauma nurse for almost 6 years.

Avid DIYer, not a pro in any way.

And yes, I agree with the posts about the Estwing. Have had it for almost 15 years, but anymore I don't really use it for hammering.
I'm proud of your accomplishments.
Good for you, really.
I wish I could do it all over again. I wouldn't have built other peoples houses for 30 years and have only a broken back to show for it.
Do you get many trauma patients because of Estwings?

Last edited by titanoman; 01-20-2012 at 03:56 PM.
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:01 PM   #22
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The basics of the hammer


Haha, I think I'm the only one.

Most of our traumas are elderly folks who fall and hit their head.

So similar, but different.

And my back really hurts most mornings when I come home. Lifting 300 pound patients can really do you in.

Off for 3.5 weeks when I get home tomorrow morning. Couple projects planned.

Gotta plug in the compressor for the "hammers!"
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:25 PM   #23
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The basics of the hammer


I got to ask, what is wrong with a Estwing, and I am 68. I always used a 14oz in trim work.
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:37 PM   #24
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The basics of the hammer


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Originally Posted by jiju1943
I got to ask, what is wrong with a Estwing, and I am 68. I always used a 14oz in trim work.
IMO, they don't absorb shock, because they're metal and unbalanced, leading to tendonitis of the elbow and carpal tunnel in the wrist.
And that sharp metal shaft could easily sever any body part that it came into contact with.
The only thing they are good for is demolition and when you really need to just beat the heck out of something.
I guess they're fine for trim, but not for swinging hard all day.
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:58 PM   #25
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The basics of the hammer


your right tito, i still have my 22 oz estwing handy. its used for demolition and when i need a little more persuading than my stilletto can handle..

the only draw back to my stilleto is that you cant pull nails the normal way or hit Strykers with it. the handle will snap,

and on the topic of head trauma from estwings and old guys.. the same guy i mentioned in the blind nailing harti plank thread who was adjusting courses so they'd line up under a window would hit himself at least once a month .. maybe the two problems are related .. i remember him hitting himself 3 x in one week on that job
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Old 01-20-2012, 06:13 PM   #26
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The basics of the hammer


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Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk
your right tito, i still have my 22 oz estwing handy. its used for demolition and when i need a little more persuading than my stilletto can handle..

the only draw back to my stilleto is that you cant pull nails the normal way or hit Strykers with it. the handle will snap,

and on the topic of head trauma from estwings and old guys.. the same guy i mentioned in the blind nailing harti plank thread who was adjusting courses so they'd line up under a window would hit himself at least once a month .. maybe the two problems are related .. i remember him hitting himself 3 x in one week on that job
Wow. I learned after about the second time.
Yeah you have to roll nails out to pull them. I'm real careful about the handle grain when I buy one.

Last edited by titanoman; 01-20-2012 at 06:19 PM.
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:41 PM   #27
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The basics of the hammer


I do agree the wooden handles are much more comfortable, only two draw back for me is they break easier and the handles get very slick after much use. I haven't used any of the newer hammers so I really can't compare.
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:52 PM   #28
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The basics of the hammer


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Originally Posted by jiju1943
I do agree the wooden handles are much more comfortable, only two draw back for me is they break easier and the handles get very slick after much use. I haven't used any of the newer hammers so I really can't compare.
Yeah the handles get slick especially when you're framing in August sweating profusely.
I use to tap my utility blade all over the handle, making little nicks all over it, which hold the wax from the block of parafin I always carried in my pouches.
You could get a good grip on it then.
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Old 01-20-2012, 09:16 PM   #29
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The basics of the hammer


for grip i simply tape the handle with hockey tape done the same way as a hockey stick. plenty of grip that way. as for pulling nails i either pull them sideways or keep a long catspaw handy. i always carry my renovators cats paw which has a flat bar tip on one end.. doubles as a beater framing chisel and panel lifter
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Old 01-20-2012, 10:53 PM   #30
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The basics of the hammer


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Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk
for grip i simply tape the handle with hockey tape done the same way as a hockey stick. plenty of grip that way. as for pulling nails i either pull them sideways or keep a long catspaw handy. i always carry my renovators cats paw which has a flat bar tip on one end.. doubles as a beater framing chisel and panel lifter
A catspaw and a wonderbar (a flatbar you use and say, "I wondered why I bought this. This is why). Can't live without 'em.

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