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Old 03-05-2011, 11:06 PM   #1
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Air compressor tank drain


Hey there. I work in manufacturing where we have a Dewalt D55168 air compressor. It will run all day on and off. During that time, it accumulates a lot of water in the tank. We have to drag it outside to drain it which is a huge pain in the butt. I'm wondering if anyone knows of a product that will automatically drain the tank without having to drag it outside.

I know about the Habor Freight automatic drain which won't work. I know there are expensive models on the market for $100+ but that's more than budget allows.

I wonder if there's a way to dry out the air before it gets compressed into the tank? Something that attaches between the actual compressor and the air filter. Or a cheaper auto tank drain I don't know about.

Thanks.

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Old 03-05-2011, 11:17 PM   #2
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Air compressor tank drain


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I wonder if there's a way to dry out the air before it gets compressed into the tank?
sure but it will cost a lot more than that $100 powered drain you said was too expensive.


If you want cheap, why not just remove the petcock that is there now, build a pipe system with a manual valve in it and a hose nipple so you can run a little hose outside so you can at least manually drain the tank without having to drag the compressor outside each time. You could use 1/4 or 3/8 inch hose probably.

why won't the Harbor Freight gizmo work?

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Old 03-05-2011, 11:29 PM   #3
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Air compressor tank drain


We remove the existing pet cock, install a 1/4 x 90, add a 1/4 pipe nipple, add another 1/4 x 90, put the pet cock on and drain teh compressor manually into a small container. At least that is what we do to the compressors we install for fire sprinkler systems.
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:34 PM   #4
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sure but it will cost a lot more than that $100 powered drain you said was too expensive.


If you want cheap, why not just remove the petcock that is there now, build a pipe system with a manual valve in it and a hose nipple so you can run a little hose outside so you can at least manually drain the tank without having to drag the compressor outside each time. You could use 1/4 or 3/8 inch hose probably.

why won't the Harbor Freight gizmo work?

Thanks for the reply,

The Harbor Freight device didn't work because the brass T fitting that was supposed to go to the pressure regulator was 3/4 ID hose. The T that was supplied was 1/4. Home Depot didn't carry anything like that so I just returned it.

Harbor Freight and other retailers carry inline dryers but It's probably for after the air leaves the tank which doesn't solve my problem. I don't see why I couldn't use the air inline dryer but attach it between the compressor and filter somehow. Here are some of the items I speak of.

http://www.harborfreight.com/air-too...ter-94733.html
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:36 PM   #5
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Air compressor tank drain


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Originally Posted by fireguy View Post
We remove the existing pet cock, install a 1/4 x 90, add a 1/4 pipe nipple, add another 1/4 x 90, put the pet cock on and drain teh compressor manually into a small container. At least that is what we do to the compressors we install for fire sprinkler systems.
I suppose that's plan b. It's kinda stupid how we have it setup, but our compressor is in a locked room that we don't get keys to. We do that to cut down on noise. We had it in the warehouse one time but it was just too loud so we were able to stick it in a room next to the warehouse. So we have to find someone if we need to do compressor maintenance/draining.
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Old 03-06-2011, 12:03 AM   #6
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Air compressor tank drain


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Originally Posted by chechnya View Post
I suppose that's plan b. It's kinda stupid how we have it setup, but our compressor is in a locked room that we don't get keys to. We do that to cut down on noise. We had it in the warehouse one time but it was just too loud so we were able to stick it in a room next to the warehouse. So we have to find someone if we need to do compressor maintenance/draining.
pipe like fireguy was talking about but run a pipe to the outside of the room with the valve on the outside of that room. That way you could walk over and drain it at anytime.


to the desiccant device; it will help but you need to replace the desiccant when it has reached it's max capacity. It isn't likely to do what you really want.
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Old 03-06-2011, 12:16 AM   #7
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Air compressor tank drain


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pipe like fireguy was talking about but run a pipe to the outside of the room with the valve on the outside of that room. That way you could walk over and drain it at anytime.


to the desiccant device; it will help but you need to replace the desiccant when it has reached it's max capacity. It isn't likely to do what you really want.
Oh okay. I'm sure they'd have something to say if I drilled a 1/4 inch hole through the wall heh but worth a shot. I'm a bit limited on options though.
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Old 03-06-2011, 07:38 AM   #8
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Air compressor tank drain


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Originally Posted by chechnya View Post
Thanks for the reply,

The Harbor Freight device didn't work because the brass T fitting that was supposed to go to the pressure regulator was 3/4 ID hose. The T that was supplied was 1/4. Home Depot didn't carry anything like that so I just returned it.
I'm no expert, but I can't imagine that small DeWalt would have a 3/4" aluminum tubing on it ANYWHERE. Here is a nice write up on installing the HF auto drain, it might help you be sure you were looking at the correct way to install it.
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Old 03-06-2011, 11:24 AM   #9
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Air compressor tank drain


By the way, no doubt that air compressors can be noisy, but they also need an adequate air supply, and placing them in an enclosed room, with a limited amount of air flow, very often leads to excessive moisture in the lines. You may want to analyze your layout a bit more, and see if there is any way to have it in a better ventilated environment.
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Old 03-06-2011, 06:27 PM   #10
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Air compressor tank drain


"DexterII"s reply was right-on. I've seen too many compressors stuck in small rooms to isolate them because of noise or to prevent theft only to have them starve for air and no one realize this. The condensate drain on an air compressor is one of the most over-looked parts of a compressor for sure. Running a new line from the condensate drain to an outside area, with access to the drain valve is important to have. One method we used to hook up was an electrically operated solenoid valve set up on a timer. This would allow the air from the bottom of the tank to be blown out at various times each day for just a few seconds. I have never seen a pre-filter to remove moisture from the air before an air compressor, and I've worked on many of them. There are some nice units out there to remove moisture after the air is compressed, but you pay for what you get. Paint booths and labs get the best ones IMO.

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