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Old 02-15-2009, 09:22 PM   #1
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Working with lath and plaster


Hi,

I have to install a closet system in a closet that has lath and plaster walls. Everything I have read says to install fasteners in the studs only. The only problem with that is that the areas where I need to install a fastener there is no stud.

Can I use some sort of anchor? Can I install a screw right into the lath? What would be the best way to attach something to this kind of wall?

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Old 02-16-2009, 01:27 AM   #2
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Working with lath and plaster


Steelhead, I don't know if you have ever removed lath and plaster, but if you have you will know how flimsy it can sometimes be. I don't suppose there is any access to the other side of the wall?
You may be better off to remove the lath and plaster, a somewhat messy job.
Put in new studs where required and drywall the new closet.
I did a very similar job in my mum's house last year, it went surprisingly quickly.
I did have help from my nephew, who is a pro drywaller. It had two coats of paint by the end of day two.
The whole shebang was under $100.

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Old 02-16-2009, 08:20 AM   #3
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Working with lath and plaster


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Originally Posted by cocobolo View Post
Steelhead, I don't know if you have ever removed lath and plaster, but if you have you will know how flimsy it can sometimes be. I don't suppose there is any access to the other side of the wall?
You may be better off to remove the lath and plaster, a somewhat messy job.
Put in new studs where required and drywall the new closet.
I did a very similar job in my mum's house last year, it went surprisingly quickly.
I did have help from my nephew, who is a pro drywaller. It had two coats of paint by the end of day two.
The whole shebang was under $100.
I've removed it before and had to cut a hole in it before, but never had to attach something to this kind of wall. Redoing the wall is not an option at this time. I've also done some research online since I posted this and I've read that you can use mollies or toggle bolts to secure stuff to this kind of wall. Plastic anchors was also an option, but it seems people have had limited success with that option.
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Old 02-16-2009, 12:56 PM   #4
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Working with lath and plaster


Steelhead:

Plaster walls are much stronger than drywall. The advice about anchoring into the studs is generally true, but a lot depends on how much weight you'll be putting on these shelves. Plaster can support much more weight than drywall.

You could always fasten wooden 1X3's to the studs in your closet, and then fasten the shelving to the 1X3's.

Maybe if you provide greater detail on what exactly you'll be wanting to put on these shelves we'd have a better idea on whether or not you really need to anchor into the studs.
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Old 02-16-2009, 02:21 PM   #5
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Working with lath and plaster


If it is just the ends of the closet you are attaching stuff to, what about adding a sheet of 3/4" plywood to the ends?
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Old 02-16-2009, 06:27 PM   #6
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Working with lath and plaster


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Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
Steelhead:

Plaster walls are much stronger than drywall. The advice about anchoring into the studs is generally true, but a lot depends on how much weight you'll be putting on these shelves. Plaster can support much more weight than drywall.

You could always fasten wooden 1X3's to the studs in your closet, and then fasten the shelving to the 1X3's.

Maybe if you provide greater detail on what exactly you'll be wanting to put on these shelves we'd have a better idea on whether or not you really need to anchor into the studs.
At the time of my original post I wasn't 100% sure exactly what I was going to be putting in the closet. I was at a home center today and decided to put in a closet organizer. Basically it just rests on the floor, but it needs to be fastened to the wall at the top of the organizer. There is large trim at the bottom of the closet that I don't want to remove so I am going to install some large trim at the top of the closet (on the back wall of course) so that the organizer doesn't tip backwards towards the back wall. I will anchor the trim to the studs and then I can anchor the organizer to the trim wherever I need to. The trim is basically a 1x4 or 1x6.

Thanks for your help!

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