DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   General DIY Discussions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/)
-   -   Wired Carbon Monoxide Detector replacement questions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/wired-carbon-monoxide-detector-replacement-questions-96208/)

Mr Chips 02-22-2011 12:11 PM

Wired Carbon Monoxide Detector replacement questions
 
I have 3 Sentrol 240e carbon monoxide detectors in my home ( one on each floor)
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml04/04534.jpg

They were professionally installed about 5-6 years ago, and have reached the end of their life, and need to be replaced. Since these are no longer available I am replacing these DIY with the new GE version, the CO-250
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA300_.jpg

My existing one's are each individually "home run wired" back to the panel, and there is a single resistor wired in to all of them at there. The wiring diagram for the new one shows a resistor put in at the actual detector rather than at the panel.

My question is, does it matter if resistor is at panel or at the actual detector? I would think it wouldn't, but i saw on one forum where someone was saying at the panel is a bad idea. can any one shed a little light on this. thanks

Wildie 02-22-2011 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Chips (Post 595734)
I have 3 Sentrol 240e carbon monoxide detectors in my home ( one on each floor)
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml04/04534.jpg

They were professionally installed about 5-6 years ago, and have reached the end of their life, and need to be replaced. Since these are no longer available I am replacing these DIY with the new GE version, the CO-250
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA300_.jpg

My existing one's are each individually "home run wired" back to the panel, and there is a single resistor wired in to all of them at there. The wiring diagram for the new one shows a resistor put in at the actual detector rather than at the panel.

My question is, does it matter if resistor is at panel or at the actual detector? I would think it wouldn't, but i saw on one forum where someone was saying at the panel is a bad idea. can any one shed a little light on this. thanks

I'm unfamiliar with wired CO detectors, but I would suggest that you would follow the install directions explicitly.
Then, should a problem arise, the manufacturer cannot refuse a claim because it was wired wrong. :mad:

Mr Chips 02-23-2011 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wildie (Post 596050)
I'm unfamiliar with wired CO detectors, but I would suggest that you would follow the install directions explicitly.
Then, should a problem arise, the manufacturer cannot refuse a claim because it was wired wrong. :mad:

I'm not worried about warranty as much as safety. that being said, the less i have to mess with stuff in the panel means the less chance i have to mess anything up. thanks for the response

Wildie 02-23-2011 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Chips (Post 596510)
I'm not worried about warranty as much as safety. that being said, the less i have to mess with stuff in the panel means the less chance i have to mess anything up. thanks for the response

I was thinking of safety also! Didn't want to come right out and say it, but if you and your family succumed due to CO, someone could be held accountable.

Ron6519 02-23-2011 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Chips (Post 595734)
I have 3 Sentrol 240e carbon monoxide detectors in my home ( one on each floor)
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml04/04534.jpg

They were professionally installed about 5-6 years ago, and have reached the end of their life, and need to be replaced. Since these are no longer available I am replacing these DIY with the new GE version, the CO-250
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA300_.jpg

My existing one's are each individually "home run wired" back to the panel, and there is a single resistor wired in to all of them at there. The wiring diagram for the new one shows a resistor put in at the actual detector rather than at the panel.

My question is, does it matter if resistor is at panel or at the actual detector? I would think it wouldn't, but i saw on one forum where someone was saying at the panel is a bad idea. can any one shed a little light on this. thanks

Are these part of your home alarm system?
Ron

iminaquagmire 02-23-2011 02:51 PM

I assume these have a resistor being a part of a low volt fire alarm system. I've never personally dealt with them, however I would suggest you look for CO detectors with LCD displays. It makes it much easier to trouble shoot them. Counting beeps when time is important is not something I particularly care for. I am glad to see you are proactive in keeping up with replacement. Most people never think about them until they go off.

Mr Chips 02-23-2011 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wildie (Post 596526)
I was thinking of safety also! Didn't want to come right out and say it, but if you and your family succumed due to CO, someone could be held accountable.

LOL, if I'm dead whose fault it was will be the least of my concerns!!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 596528)
Are these part of your home alarm system?
Ron

Yes, when i had the system put in I had them put in three, one on each floor

Quote:

Originally Posted by iminaquagmire (Post 596607)
. It makes it much easier to trouble shoot them. Counting beeps when time is important is not something I particularly care for. I am glad to see you are proactive in keeping up with replacement. Most people never think about them until they go off.

Not much to think about or trouble shoot, when they beep and the light is red instead of green you open some windows and get outta dodge!!

fireguy 02-24-2011 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iminaquagmire (Post 596607)
I assume these have a resistor being a part of a low volt fire alarm system. I've never personally dealt with them, however I would suggest you look for CO detectors with LCD displays. It makes it much easier to trouble shoot them. Counting beeps when time is important is not something I particularly care for. I am glad to see you are proactive in keeping up with replacement. Most people never think about them until they go off.


Did the new detectors come with resistors? What is the voltage of the new detctors and the existing panel? Are the detectors listed for use with a panel, if so, are they listed for use with that panel? This assumes there is a panel.

Mr Chips 02-25-2011 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fireguy (Post 597578)
Did the new detectors come with resistors? What is the voltage of the new detctors and the existing panel? Are the detectors listed for use with a panel, if so, are they listed for use with that panel? This assumes there is a panel.

New detectors were ordered but have yet to arrive ( hopefully today). When my system was installed, these detectors did not exist. My original detectors were Sentrol 240 and GE bought Sentrol and disconed the 240 and came out with the 250 ( the ones I ordered) as it's replacement. The specs on both are nearly identical and my guess is GE made the change in appearance and model # because of a recall they had on these back in 2002

aaronbrace 03-27-2011 01:14 PM

Resistors are important
 
You definitely want to use the resistor and it should be installed at the CO detector. The resistor configuration is there so that the alarm panel can "supervise" the CO detector. This is required for any life-safety devices like smoke and CO detectors. Your alarm panel may need to be reprogrammed for this zone for this to work. On a DSC panel this zone should be set as "24-Hour Fire".

When wired properly, it works like this:

Normal Operating Condition: Panel sees 5.6KOhm. Things are good.
When in alarm: NO contact closes and shorts out the resistor. Panel sees 0 Ohms. This indicates that you have a CO alarm
Fault/Trouble: Panel sees an open circuit (billions of Ohms). This indicates trouble.

So, if the wire gets cut going to your CO detector, or if the CO detector senses the sensor is going bad, it will open the circuit. Your panel will read this and show a malfunction light on the keypad to tell you that the zone has a problem without rolling fire trucks.

Long story short, it is much slicker and safer wiring it properly with the resistor.

---Aaron

Wildie 03-27-2011 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aaronbrace (Post 617986)
You definitely want to use the resistor and it should be installed at the CO detector. The resistor configuration is there so that the alarm panel can "supervise" the CO detector. This is required for any life-safety devices like smoke and CO detectors. Your alarm panel may need to be reprogrammed for this zone for this to work. On a DSC panel this zone should be set as "24-Hour Fire".

When wired properly, it works like this:

Normal Operating Condition: Panel sees 5.6KOhm. Things are good.
When in alarm: NO contact closes and shorts out the resistor. Panel sees 0 Ohms. This indicates that you have a CO alarm
Fault/Trouble: Panel sees an open circuit (billions of Ohms). This indicates trouble.

So, if the wire gets cut going to your CO detector, or if the CO detector senses the sensor is going bad, it will open the circuit. Your panel will read this and show a malfunction light on the keypad to tell you that the zone has a problem without rolling fire trucks.

Long story short, it is much slicker and safer wiring it properly with the resistor.

---Aaron

I agree with you totally Aaron! :thumbsup: In days of yore, before I retired I serviced fire alarm systems and end of line resistors are commonly used.
I was reluctant to say, in regards to CO detectors as I retired before these came into use.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:23 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved