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Old 02-18-2009, 04:42 PM   #1
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Wire shelving install


Hello,

I'm converting a 4" coat closet into a pantry. I'm using the ClosetMaid shelftrack system.

The hang track piece does not line up with the studs in my wall (I can screw it into one stud but the other screws will have to be secured in drywall. The instructions suggest using toggle bolts and drilling a 1/2" hole. I don't have a drill that will take a 1/2 drill bit. Can I get away with screwing into one stud and using E-Z wall anchors (50lb rated) for the other 4 screws?

Thanks,

Chris

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Old 02-18-2009, 04:45 PM   #2
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Wire shelving install


You can normally waller out a hole that will fit a toggle bolt. I seldom use a drill with messing with drywall.

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Old 02-18-2009, 04:55 PM   #3
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Probably a dumb question, but how do you "waller out a hole"?
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Old 02-18-2009, 06:26 PM   #4
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Poke through the drywall with a big Phillips screwdriver, and then go round and round like you're stirring thick porridge till you've "wallowed" out the hole to the size you need for your anchor.
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Old 02-18-2009, 08:21 PM   #5
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Wire shelving install


If you decide you want to drill it you can get a reduced shank drill. A set of these comes in handy on occasion.
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Old 02-19-2009, 05:40 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
Poke through the drywall with a big Phillips screwdriver, and then go round and round like you're stirring thick porridge till you've "wallowed" out the hole to the size you need for your anchor.
Exactly!
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:55 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red01baron View Post
Hello,

I'm converting a 4" coat closet into a pantry. I'm using the ClosetMaid shelftrack system.

The hang track piece does not line up with the studs in my wall (I can screw it into one stud but the other screws will have to be secured in drywall. The instructions suggest using toggle bolts and drilling a 1/2" hole. I don't have a drill that will take a 1/2 drill bit. Can I get away with screwing into one stud and using E-Z wall anchors (50lb rated) for the other 4 screws?
Yes, to your question.

I presume the coat closet is four-foot wide and your shelves would be approximately 4-foot wide?

As long as you don't overload your new food pantry shelves with an over abundance of canned food items, heavy crock pots, hefty waffle grills, etc., you should be okay. Just those 4 E-Z hollow wall anchors alone are capable of holding a combined 200 pound payload (50 lbs each x 4) of shelves and stored goods.

There is also an E-Z wall anchor (E-Z Ancor Stud Solver) that is capable of screwing directly into a stud. [You may already have this fastener in your arsenal.]

Make sure to use the correct screw that threads into the anchor so that each anchor will achieve its maximum designed payload rating. You're going to be holding up a set of heavily laden (potentially) pantry shelves with these anchors. Also, use the largest diameter (#6, #8, etc.) screw that the anchor can properly handle to get the proper shear-strength of the screw itself.

If there is any question to the holding power of your anchors, it's better to slightly over-do-it with the wall fasteners (anchors) for a mere few cents more since the labor should still be the same. This way you also build in a safety factory utilizing the better anchors. This extra safety margin could forestall any collapse of the total shelf system due to a sudden overload such as a small child climbing up to retrieve a can of their favorite Chef Boyardee® beef ravioli.

Good luck.

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