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-   -   What type of screw to use with drywall anchor? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/what-type-screw-use-drywall-anchor-112183/)

djgrant 07-27-2011 04:05 PM

What type of screw to use with drywall anchor?
 
What kind of screws should I use with those plastic drywall anchors? I have noticed that something I buy comes with anchors and screws, the screws usually have threads all the way up the entire shank; however, when I go to the hardware store, the wood screws all seem to have a portion near the top of the screw (near head) where there are no threads. So what kind of screws are those ones that come with things that you buy (like a curtain rod, for example). I also notice that the threads look slightly different, like a bit bigger than those on wood screws?

Thanks so much for any help you can give me!

gregzoll 07-27-2011 04:12 PM

They are a pointed course thread machine head screws.

Ron6519 07-27-2011 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djgrant (Post 694988)
What kind of screws should I use with those plastic drywall anchors? I have noticed that something I buy comes with anchors and screws, the screws usually have threads all the way up the entire shank; however, when I go to the hardware store, the wood screws all seem to have a portion near the top of the screw (near head) where there are no threads. So what kind of screws are those ones that come with things that you buy (like a curtain rod, for example). I also notice that the threads look slightly different, like a bit bigger than those on wood screws?

Thanks so much for any help you can give me!

They sell kits in stores that include the screws and anchors, along with the bit. Those screws have the threads all the way up the shank.
Sheetmetal screws will also have the threads all the way up.

Mr Chips 07-27-2011 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 694991)
They are a pointed course thread machine head screws.

The screw "type" really doesnt matter in a conical plastic anchor, as long as the diameter is correct, wood or sheetmetal screws will work just fine, and the head style makes no differance at all. Don't worry if your screw isn't fully threaded, as long you have enough thread to engage about 70% of the anchor you should see little or no differance in holding power

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA300_.jpg

gregzoll 07-27-2011 07:19 PM

Actually you want course threaded pan head screws, not fine thread. Also, drywall screws are not the proper type to use with these anchors.

Mr Chips 07-27-2011 08:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 695116)
Actually you want course threaded pan head screws, not fine thread. Also, drywall screws are not the proper type to use with these anchors.

Actually, if the anchors are being used in drywall it makes absolutely no differance if you use fine, course, or drywall screws if you load is light enough. The drywall will fail long before the screw will seperate from the anchor. In concrete you can use sheet metal OR wood screws as well with no change to the failure rates.

Your holding power here comes from expansive forces of the plastic angainst the base material ( drywall in this example). If your load is a static shear load you could darn near skip the screw altogether and use a nail driven into the anchor

And the head makes absolutely no differance. Pan head, flat head, oval head, truss head, bugle head, etc.. It has NOTHING to do with the anchor. Use whatever head makes sense for the fixing you are anchoring

jklingel 07-27-2011 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djgrant (Post 694988)
What kind of screws should I use with those plastic drywall anchors?

Just make sure nothing like a fuel line is being anchored with the plastic ones, as in boiler/utility rooms. They melt in a fire; use the metal ones.

Mr Chips 07-27-2011 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jklingel (Post 695192)
Just make sure nothing like a fuel line is being anchored with the plastic ones, as in boiler/utility rooms. They melt in a fire; use the metal ones.

the "metal ones" are usually made of lead or Zamac, which has a melting point of around 400 degrees F or less


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