Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-27-2011, 10:36 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What does this look like to you?


I discovered these copper pipes running from the front of the house all the way to the back of the house through the crawl space. They emerge into a cellar at the back of the house where they go down and into the ground. I was told by the previous owner that there used to be an oil tank at the front of the house that was dug up to make room for a driveway. Could these be the old lines for the oil tank? I don't know how all of the plumbing for a heating oil system works. The house is now all on natural gas.

[IMG] IMAG0182 by jg1996business, on Flickr[/IMG]

jerseyguy1996 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 10:57 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,786
Rewards Points: 1,086
Default

What does this look like to you?


I've been surprised more than a few times, particularly in older houses, but yes, my first guess would be that those are heating oil lines. The thing that doesn't make sense though is that if the tank was in front of the house, one would think that the other end of them would terminate in the vivinity of where the furnace is or was. So, until it can be verified, I would carefully dig where they go into the ground, and, assuming that you can find where they are cut off, remove them, or leave them if you want, and a future homeowner can ask someone else about them, after you and I are gone.

DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 11:17 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What does this look like to you?


Quote:
Originally Posted by DexterII View Post
I've been surprised more than a few times, particularly in older houses, but yes, my first guess would be that those are heating oil lines. The thing that doesn't make sense though is that if the tank was in front of the house, one would think that the other end of them would terminate in the vivinity of where the furnace is or was. So, until it can be verified, I would carefully dig where they go into the ground, and, assuming that you can find where they are cut off, remove them, or leave them if you want, and a future homeowner can ask someone else about them, after you and I are gone.
That was my first thought "Why are they going into the ground at the back of the house if the tank was buried at the front of the house? Did the previous homeowner lie to me to avoid having to disclose that there is a buried tank under the cellar of the house that is almost completely inaccessible and would probably cost a FORTUNE to remove? Am I going to really regret not spending the $300 bucks to hire the guy to come out and sweep the property with a metal detector prior to the sale?" All things that ran through my head in about half a second. Why would an oil system have two copper lines though? Is that typical? The natural gas furnace is in the cellar so I am guessing the oil burner was back there at one time as well.
jerseyguy1996 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 11:27 AM   #4
Member
 
biggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 3,630
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What does this look like to you?


you've had oil in that house at one time ago those are supply and return lines.....are you a new home owner still on oil for heat or water.....i hope you aren't on PSE&G with those lines showing and what there connected to under the ground in the front yard....lets hear back
biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 11:38 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What does this look like to you?


Quote:
Originally Posted by biggles View Post
you've had oil in that house at one time ago those are supply and return lines.....are you a new home owner still on oil for heat or water.....i hope you aren't on PSE&G with those lines showing and what there connected to under the ground in the front yard....lets hear back
I'm on natural gas for everything. The previous homeowner said that there used to be an oil tank at the front of the house buried in a dirt berm which was subsequently dug out to build a driveway. My concern is that those lines run into the ground in the cellar which was built under an addition that was added on to the back of the house (no idea of the year that was done). The gas furnace is in that cellar. The homeowner could have lied about the oil tank being in the front of the house in order to conceal that it was actually buried at the back of the house and perhaps it is still there
jerseyguy1996 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 12:02 PM   #6
Member
 
biggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 3,630
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What does this look like to you?


was it stated at the closing the oil tank was removed and your lawyer verified it with a statement from a tank company or did they just add neutralizer into the unrecovered oil and that was it.reason being my cousin is selling her moms house on south shore of LI, and she is footing the bill $2000 minimum...to get it abandoned in place but a guy has to climb into it and scrap it down before the house is sold to the new owners this picked up by the inspection for buyers when he saw the gas boiler in the basement and lines like yours....sucks but you need to get paper work and file it in your home papers that the tank was removed or abandoned....just for the future sale if you ever do it...do you mow around a pipe in the ground ...don't let this kind of thing sit it will bite you bigtime....even houses that are sold with oil heat and tanks in the ground as built back when sellers have to install poly-fiber tanks like in those gas stations....i'm sure youv'e seen out there all of a sudden the gas station closes and is fenced off right after 2000 they were mandated to pull the steel tanks for poly but closed instead....tank might of been on the side ask a neighbor if you have a track house they are alll the same knock on a door especuially if they are still on oil...
biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 12:30 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,786
Rewards Points: 1,086
Default

What does this look like to you?


Okay, I should have asked, but since the furnace is in the vicinity of the lines in the cellar, I would start there, just to confirm that they are abandonded. They're probably not buried too deep, so you may even be able to simply pull them out of the ground. At the front of the house, I would identify where they enter, and dig out from there, to see if you find a tank at the end of them. The tank probably wasn't too far from the house, so a shovel and two beers might do it. If the tank is gone, fine; if not, then you have to decide what to do, but my first call at that point would be my attorney.
DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 12:42 PM   #8
Member
 
biggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 3,630
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What does this look like to you?


if you want to see if they have oil within them shut the valves break the BOTTOM flare nut push valve line over...5 gallon bucket...then open the valve there is no pressure but open it slowly just in case..... if you hear a whoooooooosh or any sucction sound the tank in in the ground..if you get a drip of oil maybe just the lines....not going to expand on if the tank is in the ground with oil within it...and possibly leaking from rot....in Jersy forgettaboutiiiit
biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 02:07 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What does this look like to you?


Thanks everyone for the great replies! Looks like I have a date with a shovel (and a few beers) as soon as I get my current project completed.
jerseyguy1996 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 03:27 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What does this look like to you?


I had a 550 gal. tank abandoned when I converted to gas in 9/2000. Cost to abandon the tank was about $900. I had the same lines coming in from the exterior. The tank was about 2 feet under the ground. They dug down and cut it open with a Sawzall. They removed the sludge and wiped it down with a solvent. Then they cut a hole in the bottom and filled it with sand.

__________________
Ron
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
B. Franklin 1759
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.