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-   -   Water damage in exterior wall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/water-damage-exterior-wall-59538/)

Itsdanf 12-18-2009 04:32 PM

Water damage in exterior wall
 
3 Attachment(s)
I’ve recently discovered a slow water leak in one of my kitchen walls, which is an exterior wall. It apparently has been leaking for many months. I’ve opened the wall up from the inside, fixed the leak, and started the cleanup process on the inside. The plywood sheathing and studs were stained a couple feet up from the bottom plate. We’re treating it with 50/50 water/bleach, and scrubbing it down.

My concern is the exterior side of the sheathing. My exterior is bricked in, and I really don’t want to have to tear out bricks to fix this situation. I’m attaching some photos below. Any suggestions on how to address this??

Bob Mariani 12-18-2009 04:49 PM

Be sure you area is allowed to dry completely. You need heat for this. Then apply a wood epoxy hardener to the affected areas. This will seal and harder the wood fibers. You can then install new insulation and new drywall. Use mold free drywall this time. (denshield)

Kevin M. 12-18-2009 05:09 PM

Where was the leak that you fixed?

KK

Itsdanf 12-18-2009 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 368826)
Be sure you area is allowed to dry completely. You need heat for this. Then apply a wood epoxy hardener to the affected areas. This will seal and harder the wood fibers. You can then install new insulation and new drywall. Use mold free drywall this time. (denshield)

Bob, do you think I have to worry about the other (exterior-facing) side of the sheathing?

Itsdanf 12-18-2009 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kevin M. (Post 368835)
Where was the leak that you fixed?

KK

It was the tubing supporting the ice maker valve seen in the photos. I get into (excessive) detail on the Project Showcase thread I started about this unintended kitchen remodel:

http://www.diychatroom.com/f49/unint...remodel-59526/

Daniel Holzman 12-18-2009 06:27 PM

The damage does not appear to be more than cosmetic. I agree with previous post, use wood hardener (Minwax makes this product, and I have used it successfully). I would not worry at all about the exterior, since it is bricked in.

Itsdanf 12-18-2009 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 368882)
The damage does not appear to be more than cosmetic. I agree with previous post, use wood hardener (Minwax makes this product, and I have used it successfully). I would not worry at all about the exterior, since it is bricked in.

:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
Excellent! I REALLY didn't want to have to face the prospect of breaking into the brick side! Thanks Bob and Daniel for the feedback and advice.

Dan

Gary in WA 12-18-2009 08:29 PM

I'm glad it was plywood: http://www.eima.com/pdfs/The%20Perfe...r%20Stucco.pdf
http://www.fureyco.com/content/image...ng_The_Air.pdf
Be safe, Gary

Itsdanf 12-18-2009 11:03 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Gary, thanks for the link. Interesting article. And yes, I'm glad it was plywood too! :yes:

Question: My wall originally had a plastic vapor barrier behind the drywall. The article in your link stated "Except in extreme heating climates plastic vapor barriers are unnecessary." In my humble part of Texas, winter temps can dip as low as 15-20F (not many of these, thank goodness), but we often hit tripple-digit temps in the summer (went 3 straight months last summer with hi's at/over 100F -- although it was an unusually hot/dry summer).

Under these circumstances, is it okay to re-install a plastic vapor barrier when I put the wall back together? Or would it be better to use the paper backing of replacement insulation as an alternative? I've got about a 12' span of wall to consider (see attached photo).

Bob Mariani 12-19-2009 08:11 AM

In your case use the paper-backed insulation and be sure the paper is making a complete seal. A 1" square opening in a wall finish will dump 32 pints of water into the wall in one year.

mikey48 12-19-2009 01:04 PM

There are now better chemicals to use for mold removal than bleach. Most hardware stores have it. Might be a good idea to use some of it before you use the hardener.

Itsdanf 12-19-2009 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikey48 (Post 369229)
There are now better chemicals to use for mold removal than bleach. Most hardware stores have it. Might be a good idea to use some of it before you use the hardener.

Interesting. Better than bleach? I thought dead was dead, and that bleach (in a reasonable concentration) would kill mold adequately.

I wonder if these other chemicals do things other than kill? Perhaps wood conditioning, better penetration, leaving residuals for preventing recurrence, less harm to the treated wood? Gotta be something (other than sucking extra $$$'s out of the wallet)...

Do you (or anyone else) have additional details on this? I (and others, I'm sure) would appreciate it. :yes:

Itsdanf 12-19-2009 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 369105)
In your case use the paper-backed insulation and be sure the paper is making a complete seal. A 1" square opening in a wall finish will dump 32 pints of water into the wall in one year.

Great. That's easier than I was originally planning. Thanks for the ongoing feedback.

Dan

Kevin M. 12-19-2009 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Itsdanf (Post 369444)
Great. That's easier than I was originally planning. Thanks for the ongoing feedback.

Dan

Hey Dan,

If you plan to install DensShield it will serve as a vapor barrier. Make sure you remove any poly before you install it. I've used it for 15 or so years without any problems. The manufacturer recommends removing existing vapor barriers before installation. You can install the DensShield over non Kraft faced insulation.

This info is on the web site..

DensShield® Tile Backer is a substrate that, when properly installed, provides significant water and moisture resistance— making
it excellent for protecting both tile installations and stud cavities.

DensShield is composed of a proprietary, water-resistant treated
core that is covered front and back with fiberglass mats. The mats are permanently integrated with the core during manufacturing,
preventing delamination problems that can occur with paper faced greenboard. On the tile side, DensShield’s exclusive heat-cured
acrylic coating stops surface water and retards moisture transmission, protecting the wall cavity.


Since DensShield® Tile Backer has a built-in moisture barrier; never install vapor retarders directly behind DensShield panels. In
retrofit applications, some paints or other wall coverings may constitute a vapor barrier; remove or effectively penetrate these
coverings prior to installing DensShield panels.

KK

Gary in WA 12-20-2009 09:32 PM

http://www.energysavers.gov/your_hom.../mytopic=11810
Remember you will have cabinets in front of that wall too, so the only way to see another (hope not) leak is outside or on the floor. Don't caulk or foam any wood so it will allow water to show before it saturates the framing.
I noticed you have the smaller soffit vents, have you checked for the correct balance of ventilation in the attic to reduce the summer cooling load? A good site in my last post.
Be safe, Gary


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