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Old 04-29-2011, 10:06 PM   #1
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Using a Rigid 535


First time using a Rigid 535 pipe threader and I'm getting weird results. I must be doing something wrong, It came with 1" - 2" cutters installed; I'm doing 3/4" black pipe so I swapped those out for the right cutters. No manual with the unit, but I believe I got them installed right. When the cutting is done and the pipe is flush with the end of the die I pop the die open and there is a ridge of thick shavings clinging to the rear 2/3 rds of the threads, when I brush these away a raised spine is left. Also the threads don't seem as deep as those on the pre-threaded pipe I have. I have the lever set to 3/4" for pipe diameter.
Anyone have any ideas?


Last edited by Bioman54; 04-29-2011 at 10:07 PM. Reason: Key slip
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Old 04-29-2011, 10:45 PM   #2
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Using a Rigid 535


can you post a pic?

have you tried threading one of the pipes you cut into a fitting?

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Old 04-29-2011, 10:56 PM   #3
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Using a Rigid 535


Sounds like you've got a tapered die set & your fittings are straight thread. You'll need to get either a straight die set or tapered fittings.
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Old 04-30-2011, 05:19 AM   #4
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Using a Rigid 535


So the BORGS mainly sell fittings that are straight thread? If that the case then I am clearly mixing apples and oranges.
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Old 04-30-2011, 06:35 AM   #5
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Using a Rigid 535


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bioman54 View Post
First time using a Rigid 535 pipe threader and I'm getting weird results. I must be doing something wrong, It came with 1" - 2" cutters installed; I'm doing 3/4" black pipe so I swapped those out for the right cutters. No manual with the unit, but I believe I got them installed right. When the cutting is done and the pipe is flush with the end of the die I pop the die open and there is a ridge of thick shavings clinging to the rear 2/3 rds of the threads, when I brush these away a raised spine is left. Also the threads don't seem as deep as those on the pre-threaded pipe I have. I have the lever set to 3/4" for pipe diameter.
Anyone have any ideas?
Go to the Ridgid website and download the manual.
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Old 04-30-2011, 07:33 AM   #6
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Using a Rigid 535


I read it last night, not much help at all.
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Old 04-30-2011, 08:47 AM   #7
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Using a Rigid 535


I do not have a 535, but do have a 300, 700, and manual Ridgid threader. Before starting, make sure the number on hte die matches the number on hte die head. IE, number one die matches w/number one slot on the die head, number two die matches w/number two slot. I usually use WD 40 to clean the die head and the dies. You do not want chips holding the die out. Inspect each die before puttng it in place. Ridgid says to replace all the dies at the same time. I only replace those that are bad. Missing or chipped teeth are bad.
1. Screw in an unused nipple, with the dies sowmwhat loose.
2. Tighten the screws holding the dies. Remove the nipple
3. Cut and thread a new pipe. If you use too much pressure on the cutter, you can deform the end of hte pipe. If you did deform the end of the pipe, you may need to file the deformity off.
4. Using pipe oil, oil the pipe, and the dies. Oil is cheap.
5. You should have a thread extending out from the end of hte die when you are done. Screw a new pipe fitting on the new threads. You may need to adjust the die setting. After the dies are set, tighten them again.
Cheap chinaman pipe and fittings ae crap. Use Ward fittings, made in USA. Domestic pipe is hard to find.
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Old 05-01-2011, 11:29 AM   #8
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Using a Rigid 535


Somewhere in the back of my memory bank, I seem to remember that the 535 unit's die heads are designed for specific threading dies. You stated that your unit/head came with 1"-2" cutters, which means the head was designed for the 1" & 2" dies. IF you put the 3/4" dies in a diehead for 1" & 2" dies, this may be your problem. Again--check the Ridgid site for info on this.

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