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Old 10-07-2013, 09:51 AM   #16
Bill Kearney
 
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


Ok, so muffling the floor may not help the air flow sound. That's possibly something that's resonating in the duct work itself. But reducing the noise of the air handler itself is likely something that would be helped with insulation.

If you're not all that worried about looks, given it's an unfinished basement, then why not just hang sheets of drywall without finishing them? Much like you'd see in a garage. The drywall is relatively cheap and you could always pay someone else to come back to mud and tape it later (or not). That'd give out a bit better sound deadening and hold the insulation at the same time. Otherwise, just using some wire strung along under the joists is probably the least amount of trouble.

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Old 10-07-2013, 11:10 AM   #17
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


Hi wkearney99,
Bringing dry-wall down to the basement is the issue, unless cut them down in smaller pieces.
String will work to hold the insulation up, but afraid the fiber will fall down to stuffs on the basement floor.
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Old 10-07-2013, 11:17 AM   #18
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


Roxul's pretty dense, it's nowhere near as loose as fiberglass or some of the other kinds of sound insulation.

I'm unclear on whether tyvek and/or typar would a moisture barrier in this particular situation. I believe there are some other papers that could be used. But I don't recall what they're known as.
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:37 PM   #19
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


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Been a good discussion, thank-you all.
We are going to live with the noise for now, some day, will install the insulation and cover with dry wall, I guess it is the best way.


...or, put up the Roxul for now and live with whatever dust falls down. No big deal there as it's pretty fibrous anyway. That way you'll get noise reduction + a good fire rating. That'll keep your insurance guy happy!
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:45 PM   #20
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


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I'm unclear on whether tyvek and/or typar would a moisture barrier in this particular situation.
Like Gary in WA, I understood tyvek to be able to resist water (liquid) but DOES allow water vapor and air through, allowing the underlying structure to breath. Given this, I did not believe it would be considered a moisture or vapor barrier like a plastic (polyethylene?) membrane in this, or any other, situation. I understand the purpose of tyvek is primarily on the exterior of the structure, purely as a secondary water (liquid) barrier.

Given this, I suspect it would work well to hold the insulation up, and would not trap moisture. Unfortunately, I am unfamiliar with other considerations such as fire or sound.

I can tell you that tyvek jackets work really well. They keep you dry in the rain, yet don't trap a lot of moisture inside (such as would happen with a plastic rain coat).
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Old 10-08-2013, 07:43 AM   #21
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


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Originally Posted by oberkc View Post
Like Gary in WA, I understood tyvek to be able to resist water (liquid) but DOES allow water vapor and air through, allowing the underlying structure to breath. Given this, I did not believe it would be considered a moisture or vapor barrier like a plastic (polyethylene?) membrane in this, or any other, situation. I understand the purpose of tyvek is primarily on the exterior of the structure, purely as a secondary water (liquid) barrier.

Given this, I suspect it would work well to hold the insulation up, and would not trap moisture. Unfortunately, I am unfamiliar with other considerations such as fire or sound.

I can tell you that tyvek jackets work really well. They keep you dry in the rain, yet don't trap a lot of moisture inside (such as would happen with a plastic rain coat).



See post #11...he has Typar.
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Old 10-08-2013, 09:32 AM   #22
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


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See post #11...he has Typar.


Yes, he has typar, but was asking about both.

Besides, I was simply responding to post 18, which appeared to question whether tyvek/typar was considered a moisture barrier.
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Old 10-08-2013, 12:27 PM   #23
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use Tyvek/Typar inside of the house (insulation cover)


Dupont's Tyvek is polyethylene, Typar is polypropylene, both have similar air and vapour transmission characteristics as exterior housewraps but, either way, moisture is not the issue in an interior furnace room - flammability is, for the same reasons you don't leave insulation exposed where there is a combustion source.

And if this guy is in Ontario, that furnace is going to be getting hot.

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