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Old 10-06-2008, 01:38 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Retired Guy View Post
I also heard that Trex gets hot in the sun and isn't comfortable to walk on in bare feet. Anyone else discover the problem with the deck temperature?
Newsflash - anything that lays out in the sun will get hot! Its pretty much a function of density and solar exposure.

Composites are more dense and less reflective so they do tend to soak up the heat. That said, I put down redwood decks in LA that were too hot for bare feet in mid-summer. Especially if they had oiled / stained surfaces.

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Old 02-20-2009, 12:31 PM   #32
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My deck is complete, check out my pro's and con's listed on the page I created for it
http://decksummer08.shutterfly.com/
I went to your website and saw the pictures of your deck. Very nice. It's the look I want for my deck. I was about to buy gray Trex to replace 12 year old weathered/splintered wood on my 29x14 deck until I read this forum thread; now I am delaying a week or two to do more research.

I have two questions.
1. The instructions for the product you used (I went to their website and downloaded the pdf file of the installation instructions) detailed stair riser and tread installtion and did not call for wood risers/treads, only the stringers. I noticed you used wood risers/treads and was wondering why.
2. You stated in your "pros" paragraph that the product won't mold (among other things). I read their warranty and they only claim that the product won't lose it's structural integrity due to mold, they never say it won't develop mold itself. What did I miss?

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Old 02-20-2009, 01:05 PM   #33
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Vinyl decking pros and cons
I advise you to carefully investigate the pros and cons of high vinyl content decking to make sure it fits your needs, climate and design criteria. Make sure you fully investigate the maintenance requirements too ...
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Old 02-20-2009, 02:22 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by GBBari View Post
I went to your website and saw the pictures of your deck. Very nice. It's the look I want for my deck. I was about to buy gray Trex to replace 12 year old weathered/splintered wood on my 29x14 deck until I read this forum thread; now I am delaying a week or two to do more research.

I have two questions.
1. The instructions for the product you used (I went to their website and downloaded the pdf file of the installation instructions) detailed stair riser and tread installtion and did not call for wood risers/treads, only the stringers. I noticed you used wood risers/treads and was wondering why.
2. You stated in your "pros" paragraph that the product won't mold (among other things). I read their warranty and they only claim that the product won't lose it's structural integrity due to mold, they never say it won't develop mold itself. What did I miss?

GB
My comments for Q1
I used their product and followed their instructions for my stair treads and risers. Only the stringers/frame is wood. What I complained about in my cons section was that they don't have a good solution for covering up/trimming the stringers. You can see in my pictures that the way I did it is extremely time consuming. While the guys I hired were working on the frame, deck boards, and railing, I actually did a lot of the cutting and installation of the stair trim. If you decide to go with this product I would put a 2x12 piece to cover up the stringers. Quadra doesn't make it, so it would have to be a composite or vinyl board. Otherwise you are looking at the same tedious trim work that I have, depending on how many steps you have.

and Q2
You are correct. The makers of Quadra are being very careful in their warranty. The product itself will not feed mold/mildew. And that is what I was referring to in my statement it won't mold/mildew. To be more precise though, any product can develop surface mold/mildew. All mold/mildew needs is a food source and a moisture source. Shower curtains are plastic just like the Quadra material and they can develop mold/mildew. The difference between composites and plastic/PVC/vinyl is that the mold will not feed off of the deck board itself. Mold/mildew can be easily cleaned off of the quadra material, because it is only on the surface feeding off of dirt/leaves/food or whatever. Spraying down a deck to get rid of dirt is easy, keeping it dry during a stretch of wet weather is hard.

Composites are usually made up of a combination of plastic and wood flour. It's the wood flour that mold/mildew feed on. To their credit though, many composites now come with a mold/mildew inhibitor built in, so "in theory" mold/mildew feeding off the deck board should be a non-issue. For the money spent on a non-wood deck I didn't want to find out.

Another comment about my deck that I will eventually post on my website is that when I was removing the deck furniture in roughly 30 degree weather I noticed a lot of squeaking in the boards. This is because the boards are not actually screwed into the joists. When the temperature is warm the plastic expands and holds everything together tight, when the temps are cold then things are a little looser and the squeaks result. We used our deck about a month before it got to cold and during the cool evenings we didn't notice much squeaking. It was only when the temperature really dropped to the point where we wouldn't be using the deck anyway. The plastic trim will expand and contract as well, meaning gaps will open up in cool weather. If what I am saying turns you off from the product then I would consider something like Correct Deck CX. My deck builder showed that to me before starting on my deck. Had I budgeted for more money I might have selected that product. As it turned out I am happy with my deck so far.
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Old 02-20-2009, 02:36 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by chalk_hill View Post
Newsflash - anything that lays out in the sun will get hot! Its pretty much a function of density and solar exposure.

Composites are more dense and less reflective so they do tend to soak up the heat. That said, I put down redwood decks in LA that were too hot for bare feet in mid-summer. Especially if they had oiled / stained surfaces.
Having a hollow board helps dissipate the heat, meaning the color of the board does not matter (as much). Many composites come in hollow variety, however some people don't like hollow boards because its less like solid wood.
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Old 02-20-2009, 05:02 PM   #36
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Many composites come in hollow variety, however some people don't like hollow boards because its less like solid wood.
Its a way for manufacturers to reduce cost and shipping weight (less product = cheaper planks) but mostly my objection to it is the design limitations.

You can't leave board ends exposed without seriously altering the appearance, layout is critical since you can't use ripped planks, irregular shaped decks are problematic, no routing of edges etc - the product dictates the design instead of the other way around.

Running fascia all the way flush with the decking makes curves and steps problematic (as you discovered) - even more so when the manufacturer doesn't having matching trim material. It also makes it harder to clear water all the way off the deck and is a debris catcher.
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Old 02-20-2009, 06:08 PM   #37
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Its a way for manufacturers to reduce cost and shipping weight (less product = cheaper planks) but mostly my objection to it is the design limitations.

You can't leave board ends exposed without seriously altering the appearance, layout is critical since you can't use ripped planks, irregular shaped decks are problematic, no routing of edges etc - the product dictates the design instead of the other way around.

Running fascia all the way flush with the decking makes curves and steps problematic (as you discovered) - even more so when the manufacturer doesn't having matching trim material. It also makes it harder to clear water all the way off the deck and is a debris catcher.
I can't disagree with any of the points you bring up. I think from your points that a deck builder would prefer something solid to work with. From a deck user standpoint, being able to walk barefoot on my deck after its been baking in the hot sun is a nice feature. It seems like there's always a tradeoff.
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Old 02-20-2009, 06:14 PM   #38
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It seems like there's always a tradeoff.
That is the take home message here. There are many tradeoffs and each should be evaluated to choose the product that bet fits your needs. http://www.diychatroom.com/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif
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Old 02-21-2009, 04:39 PM   #39
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we have had the same bad luck with TREX only our lumber yard reimbursed us and now our deck looks very nice....i would love to tell that attorney my story!
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Old 02-21-2009, 04:41 PM   #40
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I have used trex from a lumber yard and have had some of the same mold and fading problems. I have seen cedar decks that end up being stained with a pigment stain because oth er sealers will not hold up more than 2 years. So what is the answer. I have my deck frame built but do not what to buy for decking. Frame is built 12" on center as per trex.
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Old 02-26-2009, 11:56 PM   #41
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The Trex decking molds terribly. Attached is e-mail I sent to Trex.

Dear Sir or Madame:

Attached are 2 pictures of our Trex decking that we had built in June, 2005. We spent over $4000 on materials, plus the cost of the labor to build our Trex decking, so that we would have "the finest product around". We were led to believe that the product would be maintenance free. We are extremely disenchanted with your product. We will be happy to share these pictures with all of the potential Trex customers of Home Depot and Lowe's.

In April, 2007, we spent approximately $40 on products sold by Home Depot that you recommended to clean the Trex decking. We spent several hours and cleaned up the deck. The deck looked great for 2-3 weeks. Now you can see the pictures that I took this morning, 7/13/07. Just 3 months later, you can see how horrible this deck looks.

We just wish we would have saved all kinds of money and built a regular treated cedar deck--it certainly would not have looked nearly as despicable as the Trex decking with the 25 year limited lifetime warranty.

I have 2 requests for the Trex company:

1) Please replace our deck, at no cost to us for materials and labor, with a product that does not look despicable like the Trex decking.

2) Please forward this e-mail to all officers, including the CEO, as well as the Board of Directors of the Trex company. The officers and the Board of Directors need to know the inferior quality of their product.

Thank you!



Their response was basically "too bad". We strongly recommend that you do not buy Trex.


Trex has many lawsuits against them presently. there are new products that won't rot and fade so badly.
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Old 03-01-2009, 10:19 AM   #42
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.... there are new products that won't rot and fade so badly.
Sounds good. Can you be specific - what brands / product lines, and cite your sources as to the new products' resistance to color fade and rot?
Thanks
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Old 03-01-2009, 11:56 AM   #43
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With all the bad news about Trex & other composite decking I opted to stick with PT. I also oversized my beams & put the joists 12" OC instead of 16 OC. It's only a 8' wraparound deck that borders my sunroom & hot tub. Fo rmy money I'll stick with PT & stain it the color I want. I did go with the hiden fasteners - this gives a nice lean look to the deck. Maybe someday down the road after I finish all the projects & get them paid off I'll resurface with cedar....maybe not

As far as "de-spec'd" stuff that goes to A LOT of different things. I worked in retail & we had a L'Eggs display, right next to it was the "store brand" display. They were bothe the same display. The product lines BOTH came from L'Eggs. The store brand was a lower qualit7 & less $$





I also went & took someone's PT pool deck apart & rebuilt it & added on out behind my pool. I built a picnic table to go on the deck. It was inplace for 10+ years & will probably last me another 10-20 years

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Old 03-01-2009, 02:35 PM   #44
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Sounds good. Can you be specific - what brands / product lines, and cite your sources as to the new products' resistance to color fade and rot?
Thanks
GB

Most composites will fade, PVC is the best choice if you do not want stains or fading.

Pressure treated is the most cost effective but requires the most maintenace. PT is a fine choice if you keep up with the maintenace. Shrinking and splintering are the biggest concerns I have with a PT deck.
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Old 03-01-2009, 03:20 PM   #45
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There is a somewhat informed discussion here.

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