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-   -   tiling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/tiling-121548/)

patrick16611 10-27-2011 09:22 PM

tiling
 
we have a piece of slate in the kitchen and it is about 1" thick, and we need to make this area bigger, and bring it up to the one inch thickness. would it be better to do this with plywood or concrete board? (there is a small woodstove on the piece of slate now, and it is going bad, and we need to make the area larger for a diffent woodstove) we have tile here now ready to do the work, and need to know which would be better to use - plywood or cement board, and why would one be better than the other, or why would you use one over the other. my tiles (the tiles are slate) are 13" by 13" and i also need to know what size trowel to use. the floor is not 100% completely level - does this matter?

jburd964 10-28-2011 01:34 AM

Post picture your description is kinda vague. It would clean the water. The floor not being perfectly level is a problem, if it's slanted out so much. Bit if it has highs and lows the big tile will bridge gap and could crack under load. All depending on area size your tiling as will. Smaller tile would worked better on uneven surface. But if you laying a sub plywood floor it could fix the unevenness.

I'm not a professional., But I did stay at Holiday Inn Express last night.

m1951mm 10-28-2011 03:10 AM

It would help to know what you are doing on the floors around this wood stove upgrade?? How do you plan to finish the edges around any new work??

Blondesense 10-28-2011 10:49 AM

I'm not an expert, just been reading this forum waaaay too long and this is what I've picked up:

CBU, not plywood, goes underneath tile. Generally 1/4" is used on a floor, but you could use 1/2" if you wanted the extra height. Expansion and contraction differences makes plywood a bad choice.

READ THE INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE NEW WOODSTOVE! It will specify the requirements for the surrounding area. I'm guessing wood of any type will be a no-no.

Level does not matter with tile, flat does. Any waves or bumps will be a problem.

Get good quality slate. A lot of the cheap home center stuff will flake badly.


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