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jklls 04-13-2005 10:18 AM

tile floor
 
a contractor installed a tile floor in my bathroom over concrete. it was totally unlevel where if you slid your foot accross the floor you would stub your toe on the uneven tiles...we told hime to replace it and he removed it. He is now saying that it is extra $ to level the floor.
generally, when you guys give a quote for tile floor, should the homeowner expect that the flooring will be level? or does there need to be specific language in the contract that the floor will not only be installed but will be level?

Benhamcarpetguy 04-13-2005 03:52 PM

Level? Or flat and smooth? You have tile that are higher than others? Some tiles have a variation in tdimensions, but outside of this you should be able to expect a flat floor.

Is this a tile contractor or a contractor who happens to lay tile also. Did you get a good price?

Don

jklls 04-13-2005 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benhamcarpetguy
Level? Or flat and smooth? You have tile that are higher than others? Some tiles have a variation in tdimensions, but outside of this you should be able to expect a flat floor.

Is this a tile contractor or a contractor who happens to lay tile also. Did you get a good price?

Don

the situation is that in the past we didnt use licenced contractors so this time we went through a referral service and chose a tile contractor with the 5 star rating this contractor is three times more expensive than the quotes we got from other non licenced guys anyway, this contractor is now saying that leveling the floor is an additional cost whereas, i think that a level surface is an absolute necessity and automatically included in a quote even if not specifically mentioned

housedocs 04-13-2005 05:06 PM

Quote:

it was totally unlevel where if you slid your foot accross the floor you would stub your toe on the uneven tiles...we told hime to replace it and he removed it.



This sounds like a poor installation job to me, as Ben alleviated to tile will have variances in thickness between the actual tile, but this is accounted for with the thinset when you're setting the tile. Like I said to me this was a poorly done job that should be replaced by the contractor, but what he's liable for will be determined by the language of the contract you signed with him.

Probably a good time to think about contacting your lawyer.

Woodsy 04-13-2005 05:34 PM

Flat vs. Level
 
Generally, the fact the tiles are not flat is the problem. Your contract would most likely be interpeted that the intent called for a flat surface, but not necessarily level. I agree it sounds like your contractor should have been more up front about the situation from the get go.Good Luck

Ducowti 04-13-2005 07:39 PM

Reminds me of some horsesht a roofer pulled on me years ago redoing my flat garage roof. He set the drains (all 4 of them) above the level of the roof by three or four inches so water collected on the roof and never drained, as long as there was less than 3-4" of water.

Went to court over it and the moron judge ruled that we hired the guy to put a new roof on and he did. Nothing about doing it properly or so that it doesn't create a future water leak problem.

You can take nothing for granted. Put it all in writing.

Floorwizard 04-14-2005 01:02 AM

I would expect it to be done with integrity and according to industry standard at least.
Sounds like it wasn't done like that...not for sure though without more evidence

floorman 04-14-2005 04:15 PM

There are some tile that try to mimic say ungauged slate where the tile will vary dramatically in thickness that are next to impossible to get flat and are not made to be flat anyway.However,after saying that the majority and i mean about 99% of the tile is meant to be installed flat with no lippage.

If there was a problem with the subfloor in needed to be addressed BEFORE the job started not after it was finished.If he did the job then he owns it and he needs to get back there and fix it.
Did you already pay this guy?Hope not but if you are having difficulty getting this guy back then it sounds like you did.
Call the refferal co.too and lean on them a little bit,maybe they will have a little clout with him and they will be able to help you get this fixed:cool:

Humble Abode 04-16-2005 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by floorman
Call the refferal co.too and lean on them a little bit,maybe they will have a little clout with him and they will be able to help you get this fixed:cool:

That's a good idea, most referal companies have language in their contracts that say they can drop any contractor who doesn't hold up his end of the bargin with a home owner.
They will be able to put the heat on him. They are also a indipendant third party, they may be able to settle any disputes.

Teetorbilt 04-17-2005 10:21 PM

I have been installing flooring, of all types, for almost 40 yrs.
Flooring that is not 'reasonably' flat for the material used sets you up for liability issues. The majority of tile is pretty uniform and there is not much excuse for a 'toe stubber' even when working with Salito, which can be pretty crude.

sharisavage 06-21-2005 04:34 PM

Are you Joking?
 
I know this is an old thread but I can't help laughing about it. It's incredulous that you even had to have this conversation with the contractor. I'm a photographer and it gives me a good idea...think I'll start charging extra if they want the shots in focus.:D


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