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Timberwright 01-25-2009 01:43 PM

Spray foam degradation
 
Is anyone aware of any studies regarding the expected life of expanding foam insulation? I was doing some renovation and found some rigid insulation that just crumbled apart when you touched it.

Tom Struble 01-25-2009 03:39 PM

i think over time the foams do lose a little r value.Ithink you found some old urea formaldehyde foam that does degrade over time

@home 01-27-2009 02:51 AM

i've had some insulation foam crumble apart after 2 years.

Termite 01-27-2009 08:45 AM

The modern spray-in foams such as Icynene are long-term products that will last the lifetime of the home. These foams are not as rigid as DowBoard, etc...They have a little flex to them. I would not anticipate any degradation or any significant loss in R-value. Even if some R-value was lost, you're still way ahead of any other insulation on the market.

rustyjames 01-27-2009 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timberwright (Post 218871)
Is anyone aware of any studies regarding the expected life of expanding foam insulation? I was doing some renovation and found some rigid insulation that just crumbled apart when you touched it.

There's a difference between spray foam and rigid insulation. I've come across some board insulation that crumbled too; I'll bet it even would crumble when it was installed new.

gma2rjc 01-28-2009 02:40 PM

I used some DAP sprayfoam to seal a gap on the house, running along the bottom of the siding. It crumbled into powder a few weeks later when I tried to pull a piece of it out. But, it was very cold outside when I sprayed it and I'm assuming that's why it crumbled. It did expand and set-up though.

One thing about the spray foam that I didn't see on the can is that you can't use it on surfaces that will reach 240 degrees F. I thought the Great Stuff Fire-Blocker would be alright to fill a penetration in the attic floor between the hot water heater exhaust pipe and the wood/drywall around it. I thought if it's a fire blocker, it can handle high heat. I used it for that and a few days later found out it can't be used on hot surfaces either. I was up there last night cutting it away from that hot pipe, the foam has been around the pipe for about 3 weeks or so. The foam that was directly in contact with the pipe was melted and looked like orange hard-candy. I had to use a metal putty knife to pry it off. The foam about 1/2" out from the pipe looked normal.

Tom Struble 01-28-2009 10:41 PM

the spray foam in a can is not supposed to be exposed to UV, that will degrade it fairly quick


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