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Old 11-21-2007, 01:23 PM   #1
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spackle versus joint compound...


what's the difference here?

Joint compound is worlds cheaper than the spackle I typically used. I'm not actually using it for drywall joints, rather for smoothing walls and fixing nicks/dings in the walls.

I'm getting like 12lbs of joint compound for around the price of 2lbs of spackle - am I cheating myself just using the joint compound instead?

(i'm using it solely on messed up walls, before sand/prime/paint, to fix both dents and to smooth areas of differing textures)

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Old 11-21-2007, 01:42 PM   #2
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spackle versus joint compound...


Strength and durability for one, particularly when bridging holes and gaps. Mud requires tape on joints. Spackle doesn't shrink or crack as it dries as do most drywall compounds if applied too heavily. Drying time is much less with most spackles. You can buy the quick setting drywall compounds but they cannot be used with ordinary paper drywall tape, only with mesh tapes.

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Old 11-21-2007, 02:48 PM   #3
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spackle versus joint compound...


ya I noticed that drying time thing, luckily it doesn't matter much to me for the projects I'm doing..

About cracking, I see cracking with both products on any larger spots, although I've never compared or noticed any significant difference in this area. I just go back and hit cracks a second time then sand if they do occur.

As far as my finished result, is it pretty much the same? I mean, is one significantly less durable, or has worse paint adhesion, or anything like that?
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Old 11-21-2007, 05:08 PM   #4
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spackle versus joint compound...


Drywall compound may "flash" more than spackle under paint unless it's primed first. If the spackle you're using is cracking, you may want to try a vinylized spackling compound instead. Also, if you pull your spackle too firmly or work it too much, most of it will move towards one side of the hole and, although it looks good at first, the spackle will crack or pull away on the other side as it dries. Also, if too much spackle is pushed into a hole, the bulgy center will eventually collapse inward a bit as it dries and leave cracks.

Anyway, it sounds like you have a pretty good command of things at the moment.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving Joeyboy!
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Old 11-21-2007, 07:48 PM   #5
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spackle versus joint compound...


definitely sticking with joint compound then, I'd rather deal with the double applications to rectify those issues than waste money <and breathe the fumes> of the spackling compound





thanks again!

Happy thanksgiving to you too
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Old 11-21-2007, 08:13 PM   #6
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spackle versus joint compound...


Hi,
I have to respectfully disagree with End Game on one point. Setting compounds, or "hot mud" can be used with regular paper joint tape. It is in fact the strongest way to seal the joint. It is common practice to embed and do the first coat with setting mud and the 2 finish coats with drying compound.
On the same subject it is not recommended to use mesh tape with regular drying compound for the first or embedding coat. The mesh doesn't provide the strength with the somewhat fragile all purpose compounds. Mesh should only be used with setting compounds for the first coat.
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Old 11-21-2007, 08:47 PM   #7
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spackle versus joint compound...


Lightweight Vinyl Spackle works well for nail holes, or very small dings when there is only a few, they are true dings (jut dents) not rips in the rock (the left over paper in a "ding" with ripped rock will lift the spackle), and you can't wait for J/C to dry.

For everything else, there's Joint Compound
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Old 11-21-2007, 09:07 PM   #8
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spackle versus joint compound...


Quote:
Originally Posted by End Grain View Post
Strength and durability for one, particularly when bridging holes and gaps. Mud requires tape on joints. Spackle doesn't shrink or crack as it dries as do most drywall compounds if applied too heavily. Drying time is much less with most spackles. You can buy the quick setting drywall compounds but they cannot be used with ordinary paper drywall tape, only with mesh tapes.

Spackle in my book is for repairing small dings and nail holes, not for large holes or seams, although I do see some of the absured shows on cable tv spreading spackle from a one gallon bucket like drywall mud.

Setting type compounds are used with paper tape without any problems.

The main thing to watch when purchasing a setting compound, is that it is sandable, be sure it is not the Durabond in the purple colored bag; it dries like plaster and doesn not sand.

If the situation requires drywall compound thick enough to worry about cracking from shrinkage, it is a job way beyond the capabilities of spackling IMO.

Last edited by troubleseeker; 11-21-2007 at 09:13 PM.
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Old 11-21-2007, 10:08 PM   #9
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spackle versus joint compound...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chazbe View Post
Hi,
I have to respectfully disagree with End Game on one point. Setting compounds, or "hot mud" can be used with regular paper joint tape. It is in fact the strongest way to seal the joint. It is common practice to embed and do the first coat with setting mud and the 2 finish coats with drying compound.
On the same subject it is not recommended to use mesh tape with regular drying compound for the first or embedding coat. The mesh doesn't provide the strength with the somewhat fragile all purpose compounds. Mesh should only be used with setting compounds for the first coat.
Chuck
My comments about not using paper tape speak only to the quick set compound's manufacturer's recommendations on the package itself. Paper absorbs out moisture, making the quick set dry out prematurely, prior to it's properly setting by catalytic action and then air drying. If you have success with it, go for it, I can't argue with success. Mesh tape is cheap enough for me to buy and much easier for me to use than paper. I personally believe it is much stronger for repairs. But, I'm not a drywaller by any stretch and so I'll defer to the drywall mavens. Different strokes.
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Old 02-26-2011, 04:50 AM   #10
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spackle versus joint compound...


I rarely use spackle and if I do it is only for the very small dings. For all other repair work, I use joint compound.

Spackle dries quickly and does not shrink and need a second application. However, it is very hard to sand.

Joint compound shrinks and requires a second or maybe even a third appication. However, it remains relatively soft and easy to sand.

I actually find that faster drying is a disadvantage for me when using spackle. I am not able to work fast enough to keep up with it. Joint compound enables me to work at a slower pace.

I'm sure spackle is much more durable but for me, joint compound is the better choice.

I forgot to mention that when I'm in a rush, I use my wife's hairdryer to speed the drying time of joint compound! It does speed the drying time significantly.

Bob

Last edited by Bob Guercio; 02-26-2011 at 05:05 AM. Reason: Additional info added
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Old 02-26-2011, 07:48 AM   #11
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spackle versus joint compound...


I use nothing but spackling on the sometimes mismatched scarf cuts on baseboard and crown moulding. You can feather it out for 3 or four inches with no adhesion problems. If it's just a wall.... whatever happens to be closest at hand goes on.
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Old 02-26-2011, 07:51 AM   #12
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spackle versus joint compound...


Quote:
Originally Posted by End Grain View Post
My comments about not using paper tape speak only to the quick set compound's manufacturer's recommendations on the package itself. Paper absorbs out moisture, making the quick set dry out prematurely, prior to it's properly setting by catalytic action and then air drying. If you have success with it, go for it, I can't argue with success. Mesh tape is cheap enough for me to buy and much easier for me to use than paper. I personally believe it is much stronger for repairs. But, I'm not a drywaller by any stretch and so I'll defer to the drywall mavens. Different strokes.
This has always proven to be true for me too.

BTW, I patch a lot of bathrooms. Where mirrors have been removed and the patched holes for soap holders and TP dispensers always get the heater treatment Bob G. spoke about. I carry a dedicated space heater just for that purpose since I prefer not to use the quick drying mud at all.

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Last edited by Willie T; 02-26-2011 at 07:58 AM.
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