DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   General DIY Discussions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/)
-   -   Spacing of furring strips in a shower (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/spacing-furring-strips-shower-169416/)

miamicuse 01-17-2013 10:07 PM

Spacing of furring strips in a shower
 
I have a shower area that is 5' wide, 7' long. Two sides of it are concrete block walls which I am attaching 1x3 PT furring strips. The other side is interior wood studded wall.

Is there a certain spacing to place those vertical strips to make it easier to attach the durock or hardibacker boards? For the 5' wide area I was going to attach 4 strips spaced 15" apart but then I though this is probably not going to result in having the butt end of two durock panels on a strip. What is the best spacing to use?

How do they cut the durock panels? Does it require a concrete saw or do you score it with a knife and snap like sheetrock?

rossfingal 01-17-2013 10:19 PM

Just make sure the joints on the cement board are going to land on the furring strips.
You can use a knife to score the panels -
we use a saw (wear a dust-mask!!!!)
Use Cement-board screws - not D-Wall screws - to fasten the panels.

joecaption 01-17-2013 10:29 PM

Every 16", good luck trying to just score a 1/2 thick panel and snap it.
I use a carbide blade or a diamond blade on a ciruler saw.
Wear a dust mask and work out side there's going to be dust everywhere.

miamicuse 01-17-2013 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1096071)
Every 16", good luck trying to just score a 1/2 thick panel and snap it.
I use a carbide blade or a diamond blade on a ciruler saw.
Wear a dust mask and work out side there's going to be dust everywhere.

If I go every 16", in other words:

|---16"---|-----28"-----|---16"---|

I will end up with a space of 28" in the middle. I can't put one right in the middle because I have a thermostatic valve, a diverter valve, and a shower outlet all along that vertical line.

If I put one to either side of the middle, then I will end up with:

|---16"---|--9"--[10"]--9"---|---16"---|

joecaption 01-17-2013 11:33 PM

That would be fine as long as there all less then 16".

oh'mike 01-18-2013 05:52 AM

I see a couple of problems on the horizon---Your furring strips are only 3/4" thick---then you hit concrete---if you can't use thicker furring strips---be careful with your screws---you may bottom out on the concrete and pull the strips loose---

As to cutting durrock?

A sharp knife will let you score and snap like drywall.
For dust free sawing--I use a 4" diamond saw and slap a wet sponge against the blade---no dust.

md2lgyk 01-18-2013 07:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1096198)
For dust free sawing--I use a 4" diamond saw and slap a wet sponge against the blade---no dust.

What a great idea. Wish I'd thought of it.

miamicuse 01-18-2013 08:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1096198)
A sharp knife will let you score and snap like drywall.
For dust free sawing--I use a 4" diamond saw and slap a wet sponge against the blade---no dust.

Can you elaborate "slap a wet sponge against the blade"? You mean wipe down the blade with a wet sponge? Would like to know exactly how to do that. Thanks.

oh'mike 01-18-2013 05:07 PM

http://www.diychatroom.com/data:imag...AAAAAAAAD/2Q==
This is the type of saw that I use (Harbor Freight model)

The blade spins fairly slow---when cutting I dunk a sponge into a bucket of water and press it against the blade and start cutting---squeeze the sponge as you go and dust is gone---

one quick wipe of the board removes and slurry---been doing it that way since 1998---

Saw is on sale for about $39---I replaced the 1998 one a year ago--the cord was getting ratty--http://www.diychatroom.com/data:imag...AAAAAAAAD/2Q==

mae-ling 01-18-2013 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1096198)
For dust free sawing--I use a 4" diamond saw and slap a wet sponge against the blade---no dust.

I use a spray bottle and water

miamicuse 01-20-2013 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1096198)
I see a couple of problems on the horizon---Your furring strips are only 3/4" thick---then you hit concrete---if you can't use thicker furring strips---be careful with your screws---you may bottom out on the concrete and pull the strips loose---

Yes I thought about that. I guess I am going have to use short cement board screws.

They sell 1-1/4" long ones.

So the 1x strips are 3/4" thick, and the board is 1/2" adding to 1-1/4". If there are any thickness variations or I drive the screw too deeply I might hit concrete before the screws bottoms.

I can't use thicker strips as the existing strips are all the same thickness. What I might have to do is for those shower walls that are against 1x strips on concrete blocks I use 5/8" cement boards to give a little extra thickness. The interior walls are not a problem since those are 2x4 studs.

miamicuse 01-20-2013 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1096625)
http://www.diychatroom.com/data:imag...AAAAAAAAD/2Q==
This is the type of saw that I use (Harbor Freight model)

The blade spins fairly slow---when cutting I dunk a sponge into a bucket of water and press it against the blade and start cutting---squeeze the sponge as you go and dust is gone---

one quick wipe of the board removes and slurry---been doing it that way since 1998---

Saw is on sale for about $39---I replaced the 1998 one a year ago--the cord was getting ratty--http://www.diychatroom.com/data:imag...AAAAAAAAD/2Q==

Thanks. I might have to try that. Are you concerned about the wet sponge carrying water into the saw and the parts inside the housing?

oh'mike 01-20-2013 01:20 PM

The thing is designed for use with a water hose attachment---totally useless---I never had an issue--

miamicuse 01-20-2013 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1097830)
The thing is designed for use with a water hose attachment---totally useless---I never had an issue--

OK, what brand model saw do you use? I might get one like that to cut my boards. Thanks.

miamicuse 01-20-2013 11:20 PM

Another related question.

If you have to make a special cut for a non-circular hole, such as when a shower valve, where I need to cut a six sided shape to include not only the valve dial but access to the stop valves on either side.

http://c0356362.cdn2.cloudfiles.rack....com/35210.jpg

How would you cut a shape like this? I have several to cut.

For circular holes I have diamond coated hole saw bits.

For odd shapes like this what is the best way?

Use an oscillating tool like a JobMax with a carbide blade?

Use a rotozip to craft it out?

Use a drill with masonry bits to drill holes every 1/2" then bang it out with a hammer?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:33 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved