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Old 09-07-2010, 08:37 PM   #1
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


I am looking at a foreclosure that is a great deal. It appraised at $290,000 last year and went on the market for that. It is now at $169,000 a year later and has just been sitting. We have found a few things wrong from an inspection done before. I offered $145,000 and think if I could get it, that it would be an awesome deal. It has a lake view, and is 3200 sq ft. Enough about that, it has some leaks inside and I cannot begin to guess where they are coming from. In the sitting area at the front of the house it is raining now and there is water coming from under the wall but there are no water stains on the drywall..... I don't get where it could be coming from, since there are no stains on the wall or anything? Also there is a balcony above that window so there is no rain directly hitting the window. Should I run away from this house? I am thinking I can fix most of the things myself, but these things really make me afraid of it.

No signs of water outside or inside wall, just coming out of the wall.....



Outside of that wall where water leaked inside





How does the stucco look? Also that is the porch above leak area window





Pic of where stucco meets the foundation




Pic of other side of house


Some breaking where stucco meets foundation









Last edited by daveyv; 09-07-2010 at 09:02 PM.
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Old 09-07-2010, 10:33 PM   #2
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


To me it looks like the water is coming in under the bottom plate. If the plate isn't rotten and there is no mold in the wall you should be able to seal the bottom of that wall to stop the water. I would for sure check out the roof on that house it looks like it may have a flat roof and depending on the condition of the roof it may be a deal breaker.

Is the stucco real stucco or the fake stuff. If it is the fake stuff there is a question if it was installed properly. The fake stucco was reeking havoc on many homes a few years back as much of the fake stuff was not installed right and it was leaking and holding water.

One more thing about mold, does the house have the musky moldy smell? If so I would have that checked out before I bought it as there is some types of mold that is really bad and very very difficult to get rid of if at all.

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Old 09-07-2010, 10:42 PM   #3
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


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To me it looks like the water is coming in under the bottom plate. If the plate isn't rotten and there is no mold in the wall you should be able to seal the bottom of that wall to stop the water. I would for sure check out the roof on that house it looks like it may have a flat roof and depending on the condition of the roof it may be a deal breaker.

Is the stucco real stucco or the fake stuff. If it is the fake stuff there is a question if it was installed properly. The fake stucco was reeking havoc on many homes a few years back as much of the fake stuff was not installed right and it was leaking and holding water.

One more thing about mold, does the house have the musky moldy smell? If so I would have that checked out before I bought it as there is some types of mold that is really bad and very very difficult to get rid of if at all.
I don't see how it is getting in through the bottom plate. There is a roof outside that window, and the porch was kinda dry as you can see in the pics. It is really stumping me.

I don't know if the stucco is real or not. It seems pretty hard so I am guessing it is real but I am really not sure. The roof is a composition roll roof and it has been patched and needs work at the cap. Then there are some patches and you can see it has leaked in the past. The house does not have a moldy smell really, it is more musty since air has not been moving at all in there for a year. I think the first inspection I will do is a mold and if it is bad not go any further. I just wish I could guess if it is worth even blowing that much money in the first place or should I just walk away.

Last edited by daveyv; 09-07-2010 at 10:54 PM.
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Old 09-07-2010, 10:46 PM   #4
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


I would also take a close look at the flashing (if any) for the porch above and also for possible problems with the roof, capping and flashing. Water can leak down through walls and then spread horizontally until it hits a barrier such as a sill or a change of materials between the different wall construction and finishes. If it is the older Dryvit syatem take a much longer look be the system required more skill, experience and training that traditional stucco systems.

What you are seeing is not necessarily where the leak or source is, but only where it shows up.

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Old 09-07-2010, 10:53 PM   #5
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I would also take a close look at the flashing (if any) for the porch above and also for possible problems with the roof, capping and flashing. Water can leak down through walls and then spread horizontally until it hits a barrier such as a sill or a change of materials between the different wall construction and finishes. If it is the older Dryvit syatem take a much longer look be the system required more skill, experience and training that traditional stucco systems.

What you are seeing is not necessarily where the leak or source is, but only where it shows up.

Dick
Gotcha, it is just hard to believe it could travel all the way and not mess up any drywall or baseboard. The upper porch is garbage and is one thing I would have to fix, I do not believe it has flashing. It has regular ceramic interior tiles and I do believe they may be leaking so who knows, but again I would just imagine the walls could'nt look so good if there is that much water going through. One thing is though the cap on the roof is crap, but that would be an ultra long way to run to right below the window downstairs and mess up nothing else along the way. I believe anything is possible at the point though.
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:31 AM   #6
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


Here is a post you should read--Is dryvit dead???? - Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum
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Old 09-08-2010, 11:02 AM   #7
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As Dick said. Page 9- weep screed at foundation. Page 8- windows. Page 12- flashing at sections. Page 16- cap at short wall near roof: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=...VRe3TeBkJ8Lkww

Overall it looks ok, lack of flashings and trim at windows is questionable….
http://books.google.com/books?id=0dz...age&q=&f=false


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Old 09-08-2010, 03:17 PM   #8
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


I agree with CM, that water could be coming down the inside of the wall from the roof. sounds like a potential mold nightmare.

ps. half price from a previous apraisal for a foreclosed isn't what I'd call a great deal. I just picked up a tax forclosed for 20% of the SEV

Last edited by forresth; 09-08-2010 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 09-08-2010, 05:53 PM   #9
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


It's a nice looking house. The water could very well be coming in from the roof or roof flashing somewhere. The first place I'd look would be that roof above the balcony, particularly the flashing where the roof meets the wall. I wouldn't think a roof repair alone would be a no go on the house but as previously posted any mold issues could run up the costs.
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Old 09-08-2010, 05:53 PM   #10
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


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I agree with CM, that water could be coming down the inside of the wall from the roof. sounds like a potential mold nightmare.

ps. half price from a previous apraisal for a foreclosed isn't what I'd call a great deal. I just picked up a tax forclosed for 20% of the SEV

I don't know, the walls show no signs at all of water damage. After a year of being there with no one living there it would be some signs of damage right? There is just nothing there with the baseboard looking good, and the walls look to be in excellent condition. As soon as I hit inspection period I am gonna do the mold inspection first and if it fails walk away.
Around here getting a 300,000 home for half price is very good. Foreclosures go up and sell right away, this one is just a little off the beaten path. They rarely sell less than asking around here.

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Old 09-08-2010, 06:00 PM   #11
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


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It's a nice looking house. The water could very well be coming in from the roof or roof flashing somewhere. The first place I'd look would be that roof above the balcony, particularly the flashing where the roof meets the wall. I wouldn't think a roof repair alone would be a no go on the house but as previously posted any mold issues could run up the costs.
I guess yes all it could be is that balcony above, we will see what happens. If it is just that wall I am fine with that, it wont be a terrible amount of money as long as I get inspectors to verify what is there. I bet what is happening is that the water is seeping in through the door sill upstairs. There are french doors above and that is a common place people don't seal. What if it is'nt flashed properly, how in the world do you put flashing in there without taking it all apart?

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Old 09-08-2010, 07:08 PM   #12
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


Do a little 'home work'---Call you insurance company and see how much extra they charge for a Dryvit house--Many won't touch them.

. Then call your mortgage broker and see if they will finance a Dryvit house. Many won't touch them either.

They are hard to sell--ticking time bomb.

Plan on demo and residing that place in your estimate of value.---Mike---
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:43 PM   #13
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Call a local home inspector for an onsite inspection.
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Old 09-08-2010, 09:07 PM   #14
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Call a local home inspector for an onsite inspection.
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They won't know where leaks are coming from or if there even is one. They just put what they think could be happening with no true way of knowing yeah it's leaking. This house has a previous inspection and he said nothing of the leaking, also I was just getting everyone's opinion before I blow all this money and someone looks and goes yeah I have had that happen before, run away.
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Old 09-08-2010, 09:13 PM   #15
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Should I avoid this stucco home?


Many home inspectors (I am a home inspector) are really not qualified in the problems with the Dryvit system AND the inexperienced people that apply it it because it had a good name at one time. If you are serious about the home contact a moisture intrusion engineer to look at it because they have seen many problems and sort out the "lemons" from those with a fixable problem.

A few years ago, the Dryvit "system" was not permitted to be used on wood frame structures in some jurisdictions because of moisture and mold problems and amateurish installations. It was usually permitted on concrete structures and steel studs wall in some areas.

It was a good concept, but the knowledge level for good installations was not controlled and some hacks would buy similar products and slop them on without proper controls or attention to details for flashing and drainage.

Dick


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