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Old 02-06-2012, 11:40 PM   #1
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


I installed an outlet on the side of my home and I am having trouble attaching it to the house. It comes with two screw in tabs as you see in the photo below. I didn't want them exposed, so I drilled two holes through the back of the box to attach it directly to the house. Problem is, I can't get it secure. My house is "stucco," built in 1997, so I'm not sure if its EIFS or what...through the hole I see stucco, wire, styrofoam/polystyrene and some kind of paper behind that.



A stucco screw didn't hold, so I installed a molly bolt. That isn't holding either. Since I already have a 1/4" hole, Home Depot recommended I use these:


Can someone help before I end up with a hole the size of a bowling bowl in the side of my house?

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Old 02-06-2012, 11:45 PM   #2
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


All you needed to do was use a longer screw. There's about 3 of 4 layers of stuff under that stucco before you hit soild wood.
Once again the box stores gave the wrong advice.

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Old 02-06-2012, 11:51 PM   #3
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


I'm not sure there is anything behind it. The next thing the drill bit hits is wall insulation?
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Old 02-07-2012, 10:06 AM   #4
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


I recognize that anytime you pierce stucco and the protective layer behind it you have the chance of developing a leak. I understand that, but I really need this outlet and need it secure to the wall so I caulk the box to the stucco to seal it as best as possible. Since I have a 1/4" hole, should I go ahead and use the Hilti anchors I posted above?

Your help is appreciated...I need to finish this project this week.
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Old 02-08-2012, 06:18 AM   #5
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


If that is a pic of your actual wall...that is not synthetic stucco....that is plain ol' vinyl siding. The Stuff has no holding power.

There should be a stud withing 16" of that box...you really need to find a stud to anchor it to...otherwise, I think your going to continue to have problems. Your vinyl is about as strong as a sheet of heavy cardboard....the only advantage the vinyl has is that its water proof.
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Old 02-08-2012, 06:25 AM   #6
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You are attempting to attach to a sheet of Styrofoam----

But you know that already---those zip anchors might work--but the Styrofoam might just crush--

seal the penetrations with a waterproof caulk---Is Dryvit Dead???? - General Discussion - Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum
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Old 02-08-2012, 10:17 AM   #7
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


I should clarify that the pic with the vinyl siding is not my house, it was done for illustration.

After reading articles about EIFS I started to panic a little as my house was constructed in 1997, right when builders were making the switch from barrier EIFS to drainage EIFS due to wood rot and moisture issues. What I can tell you about my home is the "stucco" is around 3/8" to 1/2" thick, there is real wire in there (not the fishing line stuff normally used in EIFS), perhaps an inch of styrofoam and a layer or two of felt paper and a drip screed with holes along the bottom exactly like this:


From this description, it sounds like I have one-coat, which is a bit of a relief after thinking I might have barrier EIFS:
A one-coat system (Western 1-Kote) is a modified portland cement plaster that is designed to go on in one coat from 3/8" to 1/2" in thickness. A finish coat is applied over the top. One-coat systems are often applied over insulating foam.

If one coat systems use insulating foam- how does Western 1-Kote differ from Exterior Insulating Finish Systems (EIFS)?

ONE - Exterior Insulating finish Systems use lower density foam than one coat systems and do not use metal reinforcing to hold the material in place. Western 1-Kote is a portland cement product; EIFS is not. TWO - Portland cement systems are 'water managed systems' - meaning a system of flashings, screeds and weather barriers are used to drain water. Residential EIFS walls are forced by new building codes to provide drainage planes (that is very high priced) but commercial EIFS is not. Commercial EIFS are barrier systems that trap water when sealant joints breakdown. Portland cement systems are also more impact resistant. EIFS should not be used in high traffic areas.

Source: http://www.westernblended.com/faqs.php
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Old 02-15-2012, 12:59 AM   #8
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


Quote:
Originally Posted by asimba2 View Post
I installed an outlet on the side of my home and I am having trouble attaching it to the house. It comes with two screw in tabs as you see in the photo below. I didn't want them exposed, so I drilled two holes through the back of the box to attach it directly to the house. Problem is, I can't get it secure. My house is "stucco," built in 1997, so I'm not sure if its EIFS or what...through the hole I see stucco, wire, styrofoam/polystyrene and some kind of paper behind that.



A stucco screw didn't hold, so I installed a molly bolt. That isn't holding either. Since I already have a 1/4" hole, Home Depot recommended I use these:


Can someone help before I end up with a hole the size of a bowling bowl in the side of my house?
What are you drilling into exactly?

Make just drill with some longer nails or wood screws?
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Old 02-22-2012, 04:00 PM   #9
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Securing an outside outlet to synthetic stucco


The proper way to attach something to EIFS, you cannot just use a longer screw when attaching to EIFS. Here is a full explanation the best one I could find.
http://eifsrepair.info/attaching-to-eifs/

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