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Old 05-19-2009, 03:22 PM   #1
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Hi!

I have a countertop and some cabinets (used) that I am fitting into my kitchen (my contractor is gone now and the job's not quite done). They are all cut to the right size, but what is the best way to secure the countertop (5/8ths mdf with melamine topcoat) to the cabinets, and the cabinets to the floor/walls? These are just the base cabinets as the wall cabinets have already been secured.

I was thinking of getting small L brackets and 1/2" screws on the inside edges. Is there a better way? Any advice?

Thanks!

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Old 05-19-2009, 03:37 PM   #2
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Are you sure about the 5/8" thickness and the melamine? Melamine is not a counter material. It sounds like you have some sort of cabinet carcasse material. It will fail almost immediately in a kitchen counter environment .
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Old 05-19-2009, 03:54 PM   #3
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Hi, although definitely 5/8ths thick, probably isn't melamine. It was someone else's kitchen counter and stood up well enough - some sort of faux wood hardened surface - resistant to water and scratches but will crack if sawed with a jigsaw with a bigger toothed blade. Laminate?
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Old 05-19-2009, 04:42 PM   #4
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Quote:
Originally Posted by dedrie77 View Post
Hi, although definitely 5/8ths thick, probably isn't melamine. It was someone else's kitchen counter and stood up well enough - some sort of faux wood hardened surface - resistant to water and scratches but will crack if sawed with a jigsaw with a bigger toothed blade. Laminate?
Probably laminate. Sounds home made. No pro's use MDF as a substrate for laminate.
To install the base cabinets you'll need either starter shingles or shims to level the cabinets. Find the highest point on the floor and measure up 34 1/2" and mark it. Snap a level line on the wall the cabinets will go. Don't measure up from the floor or the cabinets will not install properly.
Find all the wall studs and mark them. Take the first cabinet and put it in place. Ideally it will touch the line all the way accross the back. Shim the low side so it does. If the cabinet is a little away from the wall, slide a shim down to take up the space. Screw it to the wall using 3" drywall screws.
Get the next cabinet and do the same procedure. The only addition will be to screw the two cabinets together through the face frame before you screw it to the wall. Drill pilot holes and use a countersink bit to give a pocket for the head to seat into. Otherwise you could split the wood.
Work your way along the wall until you're done.
For the counter you need to be very careful. You'll need pilot holes for the screws. Don't drill through the top.
The angle brackets will be fine.
Ron
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Old 05-19-2009, 05:03 PM   #5
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Thanks Ron! Looking a little closer it appears it's actually laminate on regular particle board. Do I still need pilot holes? Probably safer in any case...

I also need to fabricate one cabinet as we are one short. I picked up some melamine coated particle board and my intention was to just cut the toe kick out on each "side" piece, run a 3x2 along the top edge of the toe kick on the sides for the bottom to rest on, screw cleats half way up the sides for a shelf and just leave the back open to the drywall. The doors I've poached from an extra wall cabinet that was unnecessary and they can be easily made to fit.

I assume I can just cut a piece to fit the front of the toe kick that will also provide support for the bottom (and of course I'll put something along the back).

I also have a top piece in the original cabinet material for the doors to rest against.

Assuming this can be done without making too much of a mess of the actual cutting, am I on the right track - or is there something I'm planning that is so wrong disaster will almost certainly result?

Thanks!!
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Old 05-19-2009, 05:33 PM   #6
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


These are frameless cabinets? If you have a table saw or a router you could just dado a groove into the two side of the cabinet and insert the cabinet floor into it. To hold the sides together on top a simple 1x4" piece of pine will do. You would rabit the top sides for the pine 1x4. If the cabinet is in the middle, I would screw through the sides into the pine. If it's on the end and will be exposed, I would use glue and finish nails.
You don't really need a 2x3 for the bottom. The bottom shelf will act as both the bottom and the cabinet front.
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Old 05-19-2009, 06:37 PM   #7
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


This may help with the counter top:

http://books.google.com/books?id=jTu...#PRA1-PA415,M1

Be safe, G
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:22 PM   #8
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use that whole wall cabinet for a base cabinet IF it is the same width and height. if not take it apart and make it right. construct a base with toe kick. i did it once with a skil saw, a pack of beer, and about half the nite. Bet you cant pick it out unless you look so close as to nit pick
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:52 PM   #9
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Unfortunately the wall cabinet's only 12" deep and the base cabinets are 24 - it's also about 8" too wide... but the back is poachable and the doors will work once I take a couple inches off each - I may just use the rest as a template. It might take me a couple extra days, but you're definitely right about the beer....
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Old 05-21-2009, 03:10 AM   #10
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Narrow it to right width. you can FIX the depth. Mine was too. I flipped the doors and made it come out right, line wise and decoration wise. You set it up even with the others on the toe kick base you build and let the side cabinets be the new sides OR get some paneling / plywood and use that. More I think about it, mine was a corner cabinet upper that got rebuilt in the midnight hour to a base cabinet you cant tell by looking.(that was back a lot of years ago when I still drank beer) You can hide a multitude of sins with proper planning!! Screw that face plate to adjoining cabinets and your half done!!
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Old 05-21-2009, 04:20 AM   #11
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThomasWilliams View Post
The ground undulation and acceleration of an earthquake can cause cabinet doors to fly open and contents to spill onto the floor.Gas appliances should have flexible connectors to reduce the risk of fire. Secure refrigerators and other major appliances to walls using earthquake appliance straps.
Be Secure when u arrange kitchen cabinet
"This problem is major when color is done in our home wall. But try to put some medicine available for this colors included in it and repaint your wall. So, I think this issue is not started next time."

Thomas, the 4 posts you've made are inane and incoherent for the most part. The one above is an example of ???
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Old 05-22-2009, 02:21 AM   #12
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I flipped the doors and made it come Bike Trials out right, line wise and decoration wise. You set it up even with the others on Bike Trial Seller the toe kick base you build and let the side cabinets be the new sides OR get some paneling / plywood and Bike Store use that. More I think about it, mine was a corner cabinet upper that got rebuilt in the midnight hour to a base cabinet you cant tell by looking.(that was back a lot of years ago when I still drank beer) You can hide a Bike Shop
multitude of sins with proper planning!! Screw that face plate to adjoining cabinets and your half done!!
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Old 05-22-2009, 10:39 AM   #13
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Yikes,my post got hijacked and spammed.
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Old 05-26-2009, 08:05 AM   #14
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Securing kitchen cabinets and counters...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
Probably laminate. Sounds home made. No pro's use MDF as a substrate for laminate.
To install the base cabinets you'll need either starter shingles or shims to level the cabinets. Find the highest point on the floor and measure up 34 1/2" and mark it. Snap a level line on the wall the cabinets will go. Don't measure up from the floor or the cabinets will not install properly.
Find all the wall studs and mark them. Take the first cabinet and put it in place. Ideally it will touch the line all the way accross the back. Shim the low side so it does. If the cabinet is a little away from the wall, slide a shim down to take up the space. Screw it to the wall using 3" drywall screws.

Ron
I'd like to jump in here and add my .02. The line on the wall should be marked to whatever the cabinet measures in height including the toe kick but less the thickness of the top.

In addition to leveling left to right, the cabinets should be leveled front to back. This can be done by laying the level across the front and rear rail, and once leveled, checked again by placing the level on the face of the cabinet vertically.

The rear of the cabinet should have a cross member (back rail) that is used to screw to the wall. Some of the RTA types of cabinets or pre-fabs may have a weak or a less than substantial rail intended for installing.







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