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Old 06-17-2012, 01:37 AM   #1
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sawdust brick for stove


I started to use compressed sawdust bricks in my wood stove, instead of firewood. I used a pallet and half this spring. A pallet is equal to a cord. But I am getting tired of splitting wood and dealing with stupid/lying bastard wood sellers that have no concept that a cord is 128 cubic feet. They say they can get 2 cords on a 1/2 ton 8 foot box!

Rant over. The wood stove in my house is old and needs to be replaced. I have been building a fire with 4 or 5 bricks. But I think the firebox is too big for such a small fuel load. I would like to get a smaller stove, thinking that the small fire box would allow more heat to transfer to the room, instead of going up hte chimney. Has anyone tried this and if so, how did it work?

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Old 06-17-2012, 09:07 AM   #2
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How do you make/get sawdust bricks?

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Old 06-17-2012, 11:35 AM   #3
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How do you make/get sawdust bricks?

DM
I get sawdust bricks from my only lumber mill account now. The lumber industry is Eastern Oregon is not what it was. When I started my business there were 15 mills in my service area. Now there are 3. A pallet is equal to a cord of pine wood in heat values. A pallet weighs 2,000 pounds and is 40 x 48 inches. The cost, for me, is about the same as a cord of fire wood.

The mill makes sawdust as a by-product of producting boards. Other by-products are animal bedding. And of course, they produce steam heat by burning hog fuel. Hog fuel is not made from pigs, but is bark, log ends and other no value stuff. It is burned and the heat produces steam that heats the drying kilns. Some sawdust is used by the paper industry.

The sawdust bricks are made by compressing sawdust with 90,000 PSI into forms. There is no wax or other chems used. The bricks are 9.5 x4 x 3 inches when done. Eight bricks are wrapped in plastic, then placed on a pallet. The palletized bricks are wrapped in plastic and covered with a heavy plastic cover. I got 10 pallets for the shop on a lumber truck. The lumber truck was dead-headed from a delivery near the lumber mill back to town. The load was delivered and unloaded at my shop for a reasonable price. I am going to get another load for the house. The bricks are cleaner, easy to start on fire, and produce about the same amount of heat as cord wood. There does not seem to be the creosote build-up.
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Old 06-17-2012, 11:48 AM   #4
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sawdust brick for stove


I cut my own firewood but it get harder every year....
I'm getting too old for that $#!#!
I DID make some of my own wax/sawdust logs, but it was a real pita too.
Now that my home is all insulated nicely the furnace is WAY cheaper to run.
NOW the woodstove is finally exactly what I kept telling the wife it was for.... SUPPLEMENTAL heat, NOT the main source!
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Old 06-17-2012, 12:47 PM   #5
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sawdust brick for stove


My 1895 is not insulated. Gas is still cheaper than the wood stove. But, I like to be somewhat self-suffient and wood allows me that. I can also lay in 10 or 12 cords and not be worried about paying off the heat bill in the winter time. And wood is much warmer. There is nothing like standing close the wood stove in the winter time. Especially if the wood stove is in the wall tent during deer adn elk season!
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Old 06-17-2012, 08:10 PM   #6
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sawdust brick for stove


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A pallet is equal to a cord of pine wood in heat values.
Ayuh,..... That's 1 of the things I didn't like out West,... Little to no Hardwood...

I built myself an OWBoiler,....
'n I got a Bud in the Tree Service, that I do mechanicin', 'n weldin' for....
in other words, I get free wood....
The free wood, Sometimes is HUGE, 'n the possibility of Nails is always there...
Blockin', 'n splittin' 30 cords of chunk wood a year is No doubt, quite a core to keep my Love's buns warm,...
I'm movin' to build myself a Self-fed wood Chip boiler,...

A fair sized, but small metal grain silo can be rigged to run, 'n store chips in,..
I'm thinkin' augerin' it up to a feed auger, 'n droppin' the chips into a firepot, built into the Huge firebox I've got now...

It's still in the rough draft, 'n material findin' stages,... sorta basin' it on an over-sized pellet stove...

I'm thinkin' an 8 quart cast iron dutch oven pot from wallyworld for a firepan,...
The Big Plus in that is,... Replaceability...

The drillin' it, 'n a higher pressure draft for it is easy enough,...

Reliable re-ignition is another big question,...
A hi-pressure LP gas burner can be made to work,...
Or an electrical igniter,..??
Donno which 1 to Trust...

I'd rather shovel some chips, than blockin', 'n splittin' hard maple, 5' 'round...
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:15 PM   #7
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sawdust brick for stove


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Originally Posted by fireguy View Post
The wood stove in my house is old and needs to be replaced. I have been building a fire with 4 or 5 bricks. But I think the firebox is too big for such a small fuel load. I would like to get a smaller stove, thinking that the small fire box would allow more heat to transfer to the room, instead of going up hte chimney. Has anyone tried this and if so, how did it work?
It's been a long time since you asked, and some conversation about your fuel, but nobody piped up about your stove. I don't have an answer about your firebox itself; however, I had the same concerns as you and made a couple of purchases -- as it turned out, I got a *lot* of experience with stove output and efficiency. (I moved to a home-built cabin with only exterior walls, and sunlight could be seen between the boards of those walls!)

You can build a small fire in a big box and get good heat out of it if:
a) your box is lined with good firebrick; and
b) you have a good damper to control the draft.

I also liked the idea (though didn't get to implement it) of reclaiming some of the heat going up the flue by adding fins to transmit some of the heat back into the room.

Note: if this is done, it is critical to monitor the flue; if the exhausting gases are too cool, creosote will build up in your chimney at a *much* higher rate than it did before!

Hope this helps,
-Lep-

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