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Old 02-06-2008, 10:23 PM   #1
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Running a secondary high pressure line


I have a small Bostitch air compressor in my shop. It utilizes flexible tubing for connection to various tools and nozzles.

I'd like to run a second fixed pressure line to an adjoining tool shed so that I have an air outlet there as well.

1. Is there a way I can make a "T" connection to route air to both the shop and the shed?

2. What kind of tubing or pipe should I use. It will be under a constant 120 psi.

3. What other issues do I need to address?

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Old 02-07-2008, 10:38 AM   #2
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Running a secondary high pressure line


air tool fittings are standard 1/4" pipe fitting, so use a pipe T. The cheap easy way is just use and old air line and cut to fit. They make alot of high $ hard pipe for this but a 50' air hose form lowes and some fittings is about $20. good luck

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Old 02-09-2008, 02:17 AM   #3
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Running a secondary high pressure line


Sounds to me like it's time for a permanent pressure system, especially for durability and ease of use. You can use 1/2" galvanized threaded pipe and make it a permanent part of your shop environment strapped to the walls utilizing outlets where necessary. Soldered copper is also used and schedule 80 PVC. If the system is 60 feet or less and has only two outlets, 1/2" should suffice. If you plan on upgrading your compressor and adding outlets, increase the diameter for needed extra volume. PVC being the least durable and galvanized being the most durable. Air fittings, hoses, quick disconnect and accessories are problematic and are the weak links in the system. If you do hard pipe your system, provide a drip leg at each outlet(a T with a capped section of pipe below the horizontal outlet)for sediment and moisture removal. Localized outlets and short hoses make for a much more productive work space. Not to mention it is permanent and will last.
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Old 02-12-2008, 07:50 PM   #4
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Running a secondary high pressure line


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingfisher View Post
air tool fittings are standard 1/4" pipe fitting, so use a pipe T. The cheap easy way is just use and old air line and cut to fit. They make alot of high $ hard pipe for this but a 50' air hose form lowes and some fittings is about $20. good luck
A better cheap and easy way is just to pipe it with galvanized pipe from the same Lowes ( not exactly a high dollar item). Then you won't have to replace the busted el cheapo $20 air hose every three months.
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Old 02-17-2008, 03:10 PM   #5
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Running a secondary high pressure line


personaly have had over 10 years of use with cheap air lines from lowes LOL Just sounded like he had a small shop compressor and wanted a easy fix so thats what I posted. Yes you could hard pipe it, but that can be a pain to work around wall, corners and other items. I have even put in a quick one with pex I had laying around in my last shop to make a 40' run outside. Lots of ways to skin this cat
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:16 PM   #6
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Running a secondary high pressure line


Same black pipe that is used for Gas Lines. Stay away from Copper & PVC, due to if you have a blow out, you could end up with Shrapnel.
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Old 02-18-2008, 11:39 AM   #7
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Running a secondary high pressure line


YES indeed,,copper may work or may not but definitely the high cost way of doing the job.

BUT PVC is NOT approved for air pressure levels of air lines and INDEED cause shards of PVC to kill or injure you or your loved ones, Dont use PVC,,its illegal and if you get caught with it,,,big fines. And if you dont and your child or grandchild gets hurt or worse,,how would you feel??

Put at least a short disconnect hose on the hard line and 1/4 turn valves on those drip legs to drain moisture. Also a moisture trap as it enters the line,,,it pays big time!!be surprised how much it collects unless you live in an arid desert!!

The iron pipe is the BEST way to go, dont know if pex is approved for this either??

If its occasional use maybe a hose run thru a piece of covering pipe so walking on it doesnt damage covering etc. least it would be quick and cheap,,,altho hard pipe is more durable and lasting!!

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