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Old 07-27-2012, 03:52 PM   #1
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replacing sill plates-too good to be true?


I'm not sure if I can do this myself, but I will ask anyway since I lack the knowledge. I was told by 2 inspectors that I need all my rotted sill plates replaced (wood house). I understand there are 2 materials to use- wood or cement. Today someone told me of another way that seems too good to be true. He said the rotted sills can be chiped away in small sections and replaced section by section with a type of rubber that is blown in, and then dries and forms a waterproof seal. Then the outside would have to be waterproofed. No jacking up the house required. I have not heard of this before. Has anyone heard of this? If this is a new method, it will save me thousands. It sounds too good to be true and you know what they say about that. Thanks so much. --Joe

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Old 07-27-2012, 04:25 PM   #2
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replacing sill plates-too good to be true?


If this will save you thousands, and the reliability of the new method is 50% according to more or less accurate computer models, then the market dictates that they should charge you 1/2 of thousands.

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Old 07-27-2012, 04:41 PM   #3
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replacing sill plates-too good to be true?


Can you give a name of the product?
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Old 07-27-2012, 05:38 PM   #4
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replacing sill plates-too good to be true?


I know of epoxy wood restoration products like those I use from Abatron. The first step is to carve out all the rotten wood you can and then apply a two-part liquid hardener. The second step is to fill it in with a two-part epoxy paste. It dries structurally solid. The company also has products you can inject.

That said, I am not sure this is the approach you want to take with sills. Without knowing specifically what you have in mind it is hard to comment. I would be concerned whether an injected sill repair material would pass inspection?

You should really bite the bullet and replace them after sourcing what destroyed the ones you have if beyond normal age or some insect attack. I cannot see how you would know for sure the injected material got everywhere needed without pulling much of all apart anyhow?

Sills are rather like icebergs and what you can see is only part of what is probably going on. You should get a book from the library showing construction details to see what you are dealing with and what needs to be repaired. I will post a pic if I can find one online in the next couple days.

All that said, maybe you have found something great and I will keep an open mind. Usually, but not always, when things sound too good to be true and especially with foundation details, they are.

Last edited by user1007; 07-27-2012 at 05:40 PM.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:41 AM   #5
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replacing sill plates-too good to be true?


I don't but I will call him and ask. I've been googling but have not found any info. Thanks for your reply.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:53 AM   #6
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replacing sill plates-too good to be true?


Thanks for replying. I actually went to building code enforcement office at town hall to inquire about this. The person I spoke to knew nothing about this new method and recommended I speak to her collegue when he comes in. She said new methods are developed often and I should look into it. I won't do anything without the towns approval. I learned that lesson already and it was costly.

Why this happened? I had to have all my foundation beams replaced about 5 years ago because I had a powder post beetle infestation and all the beams caved in. Its a seasonal home so no one was there at the time. The contractor I hired informed me AFTER he replaced the beams "oh by the way, your sills are rotted and need to be replaced". Yeah thanks. I have the crawl space treated by an exterminator every year and he hasn't seen evidence of any beetles. The house was built in the 30's so it could be age related.

Thanks for you help. If I do hear of this great new method I will let you know.

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