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Old 11-06-2011, 08:59 PM   #1
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Repairing Window Frame


All my windows in this old house have paint chipping off as well as have some old windows. I tried using a blade on a recip. saw to take the paint off but it's not the easiest thing to do or the cleanest.

Can anyone provide recommendations on how to revitalize window framing? Articles and past threads would be great. Also products to help remove the old cracking paint and possibility of window sill replacement.

Thanks.

EDIT: Lastly, you can see this round thing on the window. It's from very old security system and I can't seem take if off the glass. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Last edited by management; 11-06-2011 at 09:04 PM.
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Old 11-06-2011, 09:26 PM   #2
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Repairing Window Frame


Can you also post a picture that shows the whole window frame. As for that small spot, you can use two part wood epoxy or auto body compound to fill in and fix. Really need a better picture, other than the macro zoom.

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Old 11-07-2011, 06:36 AM   #3
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Scrape off the loose stuff with a hand scraper, then use a paint stripper to clean off the rest. There are severall that are usable indoors that are not explosive. CAUTION--that is probably lead based paint, so wear a good dust mask, and clean up well afterward. Using machines blows that dust all over the place, not good.

The security item is a glass breakage indicator, and is likely glued in place. Careful application of a sturdy putty knife should remove it.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:42 AM   #4
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If I were redoing those windows I would be using a heat gun and a variety of different shaped scrapers. If you go to a real paint store they will have shaped ones, like teardrops, that get into curves and channels. You can uses a chemical stripper but if you have lots of windows to do and they all look like that you'll go broke buying stripper. Another benefit of the heat gun is that you do it all in one go and you don't need multiple applications and then washing down with mineral spirits. Chemical stripping, however, will involve less sanding at the last step which may be an advantage depending what your lead abatement strategy is.

That sensor should come off as mentioned with a putty knife. If that does not do it try a single-edged razor blade.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:23 AM   #5
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Yeah all the windows for the most part look like that.

Is it possible for me to purchase a steamer? I was looking at a Jiffy Steamer. http://www.amazon.com/Jiffy-J4000i-S...0671710&sr=8-3

Is this worth it?

Also, I was looking a a few youtube videos of people removing the window. How hard would it be to move these windows to repair them? They are hung by some string.

More pictures attached. This is before I tried to remove the paint.

Thanks for the replies. It is a old house that was built in 1880. Trying to renovate it.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:31 AM   #6
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Still not good pictures. Can you take a picture straight on as if you are standing in front of them, not all of these odd angles. If the windows have the rope & weights, it is not worth salvaging. Better to just get all new windows and replace.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:40 AM   #7
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Sorry I can't step back any further due to it being a hallway window.

It does have rope and weights in many of the windows. Since it is in an historic neighborhood it would be about $1000 per window installed. The new windows are very expensive and there are only two people around that make it. They know this and charge a lot of money. So I am just trying to salvage for now and make it look a little better.

I'll try to post a different window picture.
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Old 11-07-2011, 10:12 AM   #8
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You don't want a steamer, you want a heat gun. It looks like a hairdryer. You point it at the paint and as it softens and bubbles you scrape it off.

http://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-8975...0681354&sr=1-9

Fixing old windows like that is a major under taking and very time consuming. I did it once in my first house and learned my lesson. You have to take them apart to get the sashes out and to the ropes and weights and they are not meant for that. In your case, it looks like the sash is held in place by the entire interior jamb. Then you have to rebuild them, replacing wood that broke as you took them apart, recaulking the lights, etc. You could easily burn 25+ hours per window or more of labor to do it right.

I would think you'd be ok from a historic preservation perspective with insert replacement windows that are made to fit into existing sills and jambs. Basically, you take out the sashes and the replacement window fits into the existing opening. You lose a slight bit of glass area in the bargain but for a project like this the tradeoff is well worth it. Check it out:

http://www.andersenwindows.com/servl.../1162992734076

Remember, most heat loss in a home is through windows, and those windows are going to leak like a sieve even after you rebuild them. On top of that it looks like you have double or triple track storm windows outside of them which are next to worthless from an energy conservation perspective when they get old like that. You're going to save a bundle on energy costs with modern, thermopane insert replacement windows AND you can then ditch the super-ugly track storms which should make your neighborhood preservationists very happy.

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Old 11-07-2011, 11:20 AM   #9
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remove all the trim you can and have it professionally stripped,unless this is your own house you can't do this kind of work unless your lead certified
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:36 PM   #10
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Attached is a picture of the same window but in a different room.

The house does belong to me and I live here. I have no choice but to try to revitalize the windows by stripping all lead? paint from the windows so they can open, etc. then I'll sand, repaint, then install them. It'll be a lot of sweat but ah well. The historic preservation group won't let me just install replacement windows. They have to be wooden and of the same type = money.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:40 PM   #11
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A lot of work ahead of yourself. If you want a tip, to do it correctly, you would remove each window at a time, strip, replace any broken panes, reglaze, prime, paint, then reinstall.
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:24 PM   #12
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just finishing a similar project, mine was much easier because our windows are just installed on hinges and easy to remove.

I say pick one window that is really bad and start with that one. Do the entire thing and do it all right. Pull the window and replace all the hardware re-glaze the outside if necessary, then rebuild sash's put it all back together (if it's lead based paint might want to focus more on scrapping than sanding) clean everything up and repaint.

Then stand back and admire, feel the difference in how the rebuilt window opens and closes.... Then decide if it's worth it to continue on the all the other windows.
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Old 11-09-2011, 12:52 PM   #13
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And once you get them done, put external storms over the outside (if the hysterical society will allow it) to protect the exteriors, and internal storms on the inside to protect your heating bill.
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Old 11-09-2011, 02:48 PM   #14
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You would be amazed at how much paint you can remove with a CARBIDE-bladed scraper.
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Old 11-09-2011, 03:49 PM   #15
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One option is to look for a place around you that does chemical stripping. Take the windows apart and have them come pick them up and strip them. Most of these outfits will also prime them for you if you want. It might run a couple of hundred dollars a window but it would save you a boatload of time.

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