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Old 01-30-2010, 12:08 PM   #1
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repairing door glass







I am unsure if I am going to be able to remove the wood/molding without breaking it. are these separate pieces? the door is old. is there any chance the glass is one large piece? i am not sure what the best way to fix this is. thanks for taking a look

i've put a piece of plexi glass over the bottom of the door for child safety. my son's head caused the glass to break. he swung his bead in a moment of 2 yr old anger (ouch!).

Here are two more pics of the wood( outside of the door). But the wood looks the same on the inside and the outside, no visible nail holes.




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Last edited by joetab24; 01-30-2010 at 12:47 PM.
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Old 01-30-2010, 12:20 PM   #2
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repairing door glass


If it's an old door you probably have what is called true divided lites which means each pane is seperate. You will either have putty/glazing on the outside or removable mullion pieces on the inside. If no glazing see if you can see small nail holes in the pieces holding the glass in. Hopefully you can razor knife the paint bond and use a thin/small pry to gently work the trim pieces loose. as i said usualy on inside but could be on outside of door. hope this helps

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Old 01-30-2010, 02:12 PM   #3
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You can buy cute little baby flat bars or things I always learned to call cat's paws in different configurations for getting the mullions loose. A painter's multi-tool will sometimes do the trick too. Definitely go after everything with a razor knife and a drywall knife first to break the paint seals. Just go slow and edge the pieces loose. I think you will find they come off easier than you think without breaking. Don't try to pound the nails through the front of the pieces though! Pull them out through the back.

Aren't two year olds fun? Glad he didn't go through it and cut himself up though.
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Old 01-31-2010, 10:02 AM   #4
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It's apparent from your pictures that your door has true divided-light panes.

And that it has removable wood strips on the inside. As others have said, you can pry and wiggle those out and the glass will come out easily.

I usually start these repairs with a 5-in-1 glaziers tool and a razor knife. Use the knife to cut through the paint. Use the 5-in-1 to gently pry the first wood strip toward the center of the glass just a little. It will flex just a bit, but don't try to get it all the way out.

Then let it spring back in place. This usually leaves the nail heads sticking out enough that I can grab them with something -- needle nose pliers, a really small pry bar.

Once the nails are out, use the 5-in-1 to pry that strip up away from the glass, sliding it out of the corner miters

Remove the other three strips the same way.

Oddly enough, getting the strips out might not be the most difficult part of the repair -- those nails need to go back in at some point. And in general, glass and hammers don't like each other.

If you're careful when removing the strips, you'll be able to put each one back IN THE SAME LOCATION, and therefore use the existing nail holes, even the same nails. If that's true, you can probably push the nails in without a hammer --just use the 5-in-1 as a thimble-sort-of-thing and press them back in.
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Old 01-31-2010, 10:31 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YesMaam27577 View Post
Oddly enough, getting the strips out might not be the most difficult part of the repair -- those nails need to go back in at some point. And in general, glass and hammers don't like each other.
If you use a 22oz framing hammer and hit the glass you will not be cursing that you "cracked" it! Actually, a small picture frame molding hammer works well and most come with a magnet on the end to hold the brad/nail so you can get it started. Some electric staplers will fire brads long enough I suppose and before mine walked never to be returned by the person I loaned it to, I found I used the stapler for a lot more than I thought I ever would.

You might want use a few glazing clips to hold the glass itself in place too.

The only problem using the same nails and holes is making sure the nails still "bite" to hold the strips in place. You do not want to glue them of course.

Last edited by user1007; 01-31-2010 at 10:33 AM.
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Old 01-31-2010, 12:58 PM   #6
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If this was a project for me, I would break the glass and carefully remove each piece. Behind the moulding, where the glass was, may be a good prizing point to remove the moulding.
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Old 02-01-2010, 09:27 AM   #7
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justin.

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Old 02-01-2010, 09:51 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
If this was a project for me, I would break the glass and carefully remove each piece. Behind the moulding, where the glass was, may be a good prizing point to remove the moulding.
It is a bit radical an approach but would work and you could find a nice pry point. I guess I would tape the window to see if I could hold the glass pieces together so I didn't have shard scattered all over for bare feet to find.

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