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-   -   Renovating Copper ceilings (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/renovating-copper-ceilings-103488/)

JuJuVernon 05-03-2011 06:31 PM

Renovating Copper ceilings
 
I just purchased an old building in fairly good shape. It was built in 1887 and has real copper ceiling tile. The problem is that it isn't in the best shape. I would like to take it down and clean it up, make sure the support structure is good and insulate the roof above it (there is at least 3 feet above the ceiling to the roof) with foam insulation.
The questions I have are:
1) How do you take it down without damaging what is good?:eek:
2) Is it possible to clean them up. There is white coating of some kind on the copper. (Yes, it really is copper not tin):thumbup:
Any other helpful hints, guides and DIY input would be helpful.
I do not have the funds to have this done professionally. I am a fairly decent carpenter, metal worker. I just don't want to screw this up. The ceiling is worth more than I paid for the building.
Thanks in advance. :)

Wildie 05-08-2011 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JuJuVernon (Post 641571)
I just purchased an old building in fairly good shape. It was built in 1887 and has real copper ceiling tile. The problem is that it isn't in the best shape. I would like to take it down and clean it up, make sure the support structure is good and insulate the roof above it (there is at least 3 feet above the ceiling to the roof) with foam insulation.
The questions I have are:
1) How do you take it down without damaging what is good?:eek:
2) Is it possible to clean them up. There is white coating of some kind on the copper. (Yes, it really is copper not tin):thumbup:
Any other helpful hints, guides and DIY input would be helpful.
I do not have the funds to have this done professionally. I am a fairly decent carpenter, metal worker. I just don't want to screw this up. The ceiling is worth more than I paid for the building.
Thanks in advance. :)

How about ripping the ceiling down and sell it for its scrap value. Replaced it with a modern vinyl tile and invest the remainder in your pension.

Ron6519 05-08-2011 03:48 PM

These were generally nailed up, one panel at a time. Does it have the edge coving still in place? If it does, that would come down first.
It's nailed like siding. Not cinched to the surface, so you should have some space under the nail head to grab it, rotate and pull it straight out. You can't put any pressure on the panels or they will crush.
Post some photos if you can.
Ron

Thurman 05-10-2011 11:21 AM

Ron's correct in that these tiles are nailed up, using a round headed copper (in your case) nail. You will have to determine in which direction they ran the tile in order to remove it. Using a "nibbing" pliers, sort of like tile cutters, will allow you to get under the nail heads. Maybe placing a thing piece (1/4") of wood on a tile to pry on will prevent damaging an adjoining tile. Personally--I'd try to remove these and save them. Modern ceiling materials just cannot match these for beauty. Good Luck and post photos of the finished project.

JuJuVernon 05-10-2011 12:15 PM

thank you ron and thurman. I will attach pictures. I found out my building qualifies for historical renovation, so this may take some time. The state is about to get involve. Which may be a great thing or not, but time is definitely a factor now. Attached is the current photos.

Ron6519 05-10-2011 01:44 PM

"JuJuVernon; The state is about to get involve. Which may be a great thing or not...."
You'll need to factor in the cost of a proctologist just to remove them from your hind quarters.
We're here from the government to help you.:laughing:
Ron

JuJuVernon 05-10-2011 02:23 PM

:laughing:don't I know it, but the building is now part of the state main street program, and I'm stuck. So, must factor in the new problem. :huh:


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