Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-29-2012, 01:57 PM   #16
Member
 
Ironlight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 701
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


Quote:
Originally Posted by management View Post
Where would the mess be? From where you just described it, it seems that it is not a messy process. Just removing the radiators and bringing them to someone that does sandblasting and refinishing.
The water in there is going to be dirty and not every drop is going to drain out of the radiators, so the mess comes when you disconnect them from the supply and return pipes. But if you're redoing the floors I guess the mess does not really matter, lol

To drain:

  1. Turn off furnace
  2. Turn off water supply to furnace
  3. Run your hose from the boiler drain faucet to the floor drain
  4. Open the boiler drain
  5. Starting at the top floor and farthest from the boiler and working downwards, open the bleeder valves on all the radiators.
The system will generally drain even without opening the bleeder valves, but it helps to get as much water out of the radiators as possible.


And I would look for the closest outfit to you that does general sandblasting and give them a call. They see these all the time. As for cost, I have no idea but I doubt it would be more than $25-40/ per radiator provided you deliver and pick up. I had a 55 gallon drum done last year and the guy charged me $15 and it took 5 minutes.

Ironlight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2012, 02:08 PM   #17
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


Once blasted you have to finish them though and radiator refinishers do the whole process through to an expoxy coating if you want. Otherwise, you will need to prime and paint. Something like engine primers and paints might be a good choice. Obviously the things have also been painted with routine interior paints for ages but they tend to discolor. The expoxy finished radiators really turn out looking nice.

Before one of us forgets, you should plan on rebuilding the valves when you have the radiators off. Cost you $5 or so per valve for packing and so forth. For another couple bucks you can replace handles and things.

Last edited by user1007; 01-29-2012 at 02:14 PM.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2012, 03:44 PM   #18
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


Quote:
Originally Posted by PoleCat View Post
It is a steam radiator. Hot water radiators look different, usually run along the baseboard. Steam operates on gravity and thermal dynamics.
I isn't necessarily a steam radiator I have steam heat in My house an my radaitors only have one pipe going to them. Many hot water radiators will have a pipe feeding the radator and one going out. Some steam radiators work this way also. Check your boiler, it should say if it is a steam boiler of hot water. Also if there is a circulating pump on the boiler it will be a hot water boiler. Steam needs no pump.
mwr1550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2012, 03:49 PM   #19
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


Good luck to anyone refinishing radiators. I have done 7 in my home with a wire brush and a paint chipper. Took along time but they came out alright. Paint with heat resistant spray paint.
mwr1550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2012, 04:51 PM   #20
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


Quote:
Originally Posted by mwr1550 View Post
Paint with heat resistant spray paint.
Once they are down to bare metal, any defects repaired, they are primed.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2012, 08:13 AM   #21
Member
 
PoleCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 1,395
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


Quote:
Originally Posted by mwr1550 View Post
I isn't necessarily a steam radiator I have steam heat in My house an my radaitors only have one pipe going to them. Many hot water radiators will have a pipe feeding the radator and one going out. Some steam radiators work this way also. Check your boiler, it should say if it is a steam boiler of hot water. Also if there is a circulating pump on the boiler it will be a hot water boiler. Steam needs no pump.
Now that you mention it I remember all the units that were located close to and above the boiler had a single pipe feeding them. Units that were located remotely had two pipes. The return was fitted with a trap that allowed condensate to drain to a sump where it was pumped back to the boiler. 20 years can take its toll on memory.
PoleCat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2012, 02:35 PM   #22
Coconut Pete's paella!
 
CoconutPete's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC / Denmark
Posts: 1,318
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


We pulled one out of my parents master bath a few years ago. Have a helper ready to help lift them!

Use the biggest wrench you can find. You might need leverage .... we did!

We painted it ourselves - it was either appliance high heat paint or some sort of automotive high heat paint - I can't remember. We paid to have it sandblasted though - my hat's off to you if you have the patience to strip the entire thing with a wire brush.
CoconutPete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 01:30 AM   #23
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Removing Radiators and refinish


First of all, I would like to give advise that Look at the price of a new radiator and consider how much your time is worth.Well, My new home had emulsion on the radiators. I gave them a sanding and painted them with gloss paint. They came up nice. I will though put new ones on eventually.






theradiator is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Removing a Cast Iron Radiator MugsynSax Plumbing 1 10-05-2009 04:18 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.