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management 01-28-2012 08:25 AM

Removing Radiators and refinish
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hi,

I would like to remove these radiators so that I can make installing new floors easier and I would like to get them refinished.

I have a boiler that is power with natural gas and water/steam running through.

It seems like I can remove them but not sure if I can turn those nuts and what about the water/steam? How do I bleed this system so I don't mess the place up.

Thanks in advance.

PoleCat 01-28-2012 08:40 AM

Steam won't need bled.

management 01-28-2012 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoleCat
Steam won't need bled.

Dumb question,

How do I confirm if it is steam or hot water?

Thanks!!

PoleCat 01-28-2012 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by management (Post 836855)
Dumb question,

How do I confirm if it is steam or hot water?

Thanks!!

It is a steam radiator. Hot water radiators look different, usually run along the baseboard. Steam operates on gravity and thermal dynamics.

management 01-28-2012 09:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoleCat

It is a steam radiator. Hot water radiators look different, usually run along the baseboard. Steam operates on gravity and thermal dynamics.

Sweet. So I assume I just take a wrench to these things and remove them? Making sure the boiler is shut off of course.

management 01-28-2012 09:20 AM

Where should I go for refinishing?

user1007 01-28-2012 09:36 AM

You might want to update your profile so we know where you are? There are some radiator refinishing places scattered throughout the country that do good work. If you are lucky, one is near you otherwise you will probably have to freight the radiators to such a place (not as expensive as you might think given the things are not fragile). I would start with a google search to see what is near you. If you post your location, I can give you the names of people I have used.

One key to telling whether you have water or steam radiators is to see what kind of vents they have. Contrary to the post, uprights can be either and I would not jump to the conclusion that yours are one or the other just because they don't run along the baseboard.

Be sure and make sub-floor repairs before putting in your finish floor. The weight of radiators can compromise such and through the gravity system off. Might as well fix things while you are doing the floors.

Be sure and rebuild and update your vents and valves while you are at this.

management 01-28-2012 09:46 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester
You might want to update your profile so we know where you are? There are some radiator refinishing places scattered throughout the country that do good work. If you are lucky, one is near you otherwise you will probably have to freight the radiators to such a place (not as expensive as you might think given the things are not fragile). I would start with a google search to see what is near you. If you post your location, I can give you the names of people I have used.

One key to telling whether you have water or steam radiators is to see what kind of vents they have. Contrary to the post, uprights can be either and I would not jump to the conclusion that yours are one or the other just because they don't run along the baseboard.

Be sure and make sub-floor repairs before putting in your finish floor. The weight of radiators can compromise such and through the gravity system off. Might as well fix things while you are doing the floors.

Be sure and rebuild and update your vents and valves while you are at this.

Thank you very much for the detailed comment.

I am located in downtown Albany, NY.

I will continue to investigate if I have water or steam.

Update:

So according to this website and picture I have hot water radiators.
Link: http://www.radicalradiator.com/index/Hot+Water+RADS

So how do I bleed these things? Am I bleeding air and water? Does water sit in the pipes when the boiler is off.?

Pictures of mine attached.

user1007 01-28-2012 10:25 AM

Whether steam or hot water, with the system off, water or condensation is supposed to gravity feed back down to the boiler. The radiators should be at an angle so this happens. Sometimes if they have been sitting for 100 years they level so have towels handy.

Usually you worry about bleeding air, not water from such systems. And then only when the system is running and the things are hammering and clanking. You should flush all the gunk from the bottom of the boiler each season though. Just like with a water heater.

Ironlight 01-28-2012 10:35 AM

Those look like hot water radiators to me, not steam. Steam radiators usually have a pressure release valve on them, not bleed values like those. As sdester noted you usually bleed air from those when the system is pressurized (i.e. the water supply valve to the boiler is open). I do mine at the start of the season. The bleed value is the little thing sticking out at the top of the radiator. You need a radiator key, available at your hardware store for like a buck, to open the little value. In your case, since you are emptying the system, you want to open them to allow air IN as the water drains out the bottom of the system.

http://www.namebrandfaucets.com/imag...013654_300.jpg

Look at your boiler in the basement. There should be a valve on the side near the bottom of it that looks like a outdoor faucet. You should be able to drain the entire system through that. Open the bleed valves in the radiators to allow air in so that you get as much water out as possible.

A big monkey wench on those nuts and hammer ought to get them loose.

Call around to metal working places in your area that do sandblasting. They can get those down to bare metal for you. The cost of freighting a pile of radiators would be exorbitant.

However, if the main point of pulling them is to work on the floors, I would not do that. It's not that hard to replace a floor under one of those...when you're pulling the floor up just put some planks under them to brace them up...they are held up to a large degree by the pipes, anyway. I would only pull them if I wanted to refinish them, and I would only refinish them if they were in really bad shape and I was prepared for the mess and expense of the project.

management 01-28-2012 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironlight
Those look like hot water radiators to me, not steam. Steam radiators usually have a pressure release valve on them, not bleed values like those.

Look at your boiler in the basement. There should be a valve on the side near the bottom of it that looks like a outdoor faucet. You should be able to drain the entire system through that. Open the bleed valves in the radiators to allow air in so that you get as much water out as possible.

A big monkey wench on those nuts and hammer ought to get them loose.

Call around to metal working places in your area that do sandblasting. They can get those down to bare metal for you. The cost of freighting a pile of radiators would be exorbitant.

However, if the main point of pulling them is to work on the floors, I would not do that. It's not that hard to replace a floor under one of those...when you're pulling the floor up just put some planks under them to brace them up...they are held up to a large degree by the pipes, anyway. I would only pull them if I wanted to refinish them, and I would only refinish them if they were in really bad shape and I was prepared for the mess and expense of the project.

Your right there is an outdoor looking faucet on the boiler. I have a hose I can connect to it so that the water goes right into the drain. That's for the suggestion.

Where would the mess be? From where you just described it, it seems that it is not a messy process. Just removing the radiators and bringing them to someone that does sandblasting and refinishing.

I figured I would take advantage of the fact that I am redoing the floors.

How much does refinishing these things typically cost?

Also, do i turn the faucet on the boiler then bleed the values?

user1007 01-28-2012 12:54 PM

Forgot to mention the obvious. You need to open all the inlet valves to the radiators part of the system.

I found this place in Mt. Vernon, NY. Might work out for you?

http://www.mmresto.com/index.php?con...ishing-process

Their site explains the process and I suspect they would quote you a price? Ask them how they ship things back and forth? Obviously something like UPS will be outrageous but as common freight I hope I am right and it will not be too bad.

Perhaps there is somebody closer.

PoleCat 01-28-2012 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 836883)
You might want to update your profile so we know where you are? There are some radiator refinishing places scattered throughout the country that do good work. If you are lucky, one is near you otherwise you will probably have to freight the radiators to such a place (not as expensive as you might think given the things are not fragile). I would start with a google search to see what is near you. If you post your location, I can give you the names of people I have used.

One key to telling whether you have water or steam radiators is to see what kind of vents they have. Contrary to the post, uprights can be either and I would not jump to the conclusion that yours are one or the other just because they don't run along the baseboard.

Be sure and make sub-floor repairs before putting in your finish floor. The weight of radiators can compromise such and through the gravity system off. Might as well fix things while you are doing the floors.

Be sure and rebuild and update your vents and valves while you are at this.

There was no vent in the photo. And I will admit I have NEVER seen a radiator like that particular one used on a hot water circuiit so I made an assumption there.

biggles 01-28-2012 08:45 PM

you have hot water with 2 pipes and bleeder.if it was steam you would have a vent where the bleeder is...do you have a circulator pump by the bolier...ever hear knocking during the winter...it's steam then just so you know.restoration businesses up there must have connection with sandblasting people to do them.be prepared for black water out of the unions and they are going to have some weight to them....

ben's plumbing 01-28-2012 08:57 PM

yes its hot water system..must drop off all pressure...start to drain system open air vents get water level below base of radiators you wish to remove...loosen flare nut remove radiator...


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