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Old 11-28-2006, 07:58 AM   #1
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Reflectix insulation


Has anyone used the product below?
Can it be used instead of fiberglass insulation?


---------------------------------------------------

REFLECTIX INSULATION

Reflects up to 97% of radiant heat with an R-value up to 14.3 depending on application
Ideal for new construction or retrofit of existing structures
Especially effective in attics plus a variety of other uses
Shrinkwrapped
24" x 10

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Old 11-28-2006, 11:15 AM   #2
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Reflectix insulation


Quote:
Originally Posted by redline View Post
Has anyone used the product below?
Can it be used instead of fiberglass insulation?


---------------------------------------------------

REFLECTIX INSULATION

Reflects up to 97% of radiant heat with an R-value up to 14.3 depending on application
Ideal for new construction or retrofit of existing structures
Especially effective in attics plus a variety of other uses
Shrinkwrapped
24" x 10

-----------------------------------
Yes,
We have used it. No, it should not be used in place of fiberglass or foam insulation.... It only has an R-value rating of R-8.

It is not designed to be used in place of higher R-value residential insulation. We have only used it as a supplement to fiberglass insulation. (It can be used in barns and out-buildings as well)

Example: We have had requirements for rafter areas to be R-38 because of the particular heating sources in some homes.
We used High density R-30 batts and the Reflectix at R-8, to get to the R38 requirement.

When we first used it, we called and spoke to an actual engineer that works for the manufacturer of Reflectix in Canada - to get more information (directly from the source)....They are the source to speak to. No one else seems to know squat.

Also, FYI - If it is used in ceiling applications, it is attached before you install strapping. The strapping is attached OVER the reflectix...

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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 11-28-2006 at 10:55 PM.
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Old 11-28-2006, 09:27 PM   #3
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Reflectix insulation


Limited space on cathedral ceiling.
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Old 11-28-2006, 10:27 PM   #4
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Reflectix insulation


The Reflectix must be installed before the fiberglass is installed (above the fibreglass). You cannot block any of the ventilation from soffits and eaves that you may have relied on and the instructions call for it to be stalped.

I really don't buy the R-value based on what little I could find on the company's site. - That is up to you whether you go exclusively for the R-value concept of insulation. Often, many products use a claimed insulation level (R-value) based on laboratory tests under steady state conditions that do not exist in the real world and neglect thermal capacity. The Reflectix apparently is an attempt to reduce radiant heat loss, which can be reduced by dirt, oxidation and anything that reduces the reflectivity of the surface.

Remember - the R-value are you getting (really just calculating) is for the insulation itself and not for the roof or wall under consideration. There is the usual "thermal short circuiting" caused by the wood joists. This will reduce the theoretical R-value by 10 to 20% depending on the joist spacing (worse for steel studs).

Whatever you do to conserve energy is good if it is cost-justified and is compatible with the other materials and the performance of the wall/roof you are concerned with.
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Old 11-28-2006, 10:54 PM   #5
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Reflectix insulation


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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
The Reflectix must be installed before the fiberglass is installed (above the fibreglass). You cannot block any of the ventilation from soffits and eaves that you may have relied on and the instructions call for it to be stalped.

I really don't buy the R-value based on what little I could find on the company's site. - That is up to you whether you go exclusively for the R-value concept of insulation. Often, many products use a claimed insulation level (R-value) based on laboratory tests under steady state conditions that do not exist in the real world and neglect thermal capacity. The Reflectix apparently is an attempt to reduce radiant heat loss, which can be reduced by dirt, oxidation and anything that reduces the reflectivity of the surface.

Remember - the R-value are you getting (really just calculating) is for the insulation itself and not for the roof or wall under consideration. There is the usual "thermal short circuiting" caused by the wood joists. This will reduce the theoretical R-value by 10 to 20% depending on the joist spacing (worse for steel studs).

Whatever you do to conserve energy is good if it is cost-justified and is compatible with the other materials and the performance of the wall/roof you are concerned with.
Where did you get this information from? ?

If you install the reflectix 1st, then install the batt fiberglass insulation over that, wouldn't that be installing the vapor barrier (reflectix) on the cold side....
??? confused...
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Old 11-28-2006, 11:17 PM   #6
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Reflectix insulation


The first time we used this product was several years ago.

After reading Concretemasonry's comments, I did look up more info. on their website....

It seems that their claims have been 'modified'..since our last research and 'direct' communications with the company.

What I mean is that, they have changed their 'R-value claims' and more... since their first introduction into the construction materials field and their use a few years ago.

I wonder if Gvt. regulations 'challenges' effected this.

At this point, I re-tract my earlier comments and advise that readers do their own further research on the material and it's advantages...

Based on what is 'NOW' on their web site.... I agree with the points made by Concretemasonry....especially about any actual 'R-values'...

ConcreteMasonry: Thanks for your input...
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Old 10-06-2008, 02:54 PM   #7
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Reflectix insulation


I have a slightly insulated attic. Floor has blown in insulation with wood planking over the majority of the surface. The attic space is just half the 2nd floor since sometime in the past a dormer roof was added on the other half to turn the upstairs into a fully functional 2nd bedroom. The actual space is probably 20' x 10' with a steep pitch remaining on just one side (northern). I'm sure previous owners used the attic space as pure storage with infrequent access. Floor insulated, walk in door insulated, vertical walls insulated but steep roof side NOT insulated (other than original construction, but definitely no fiberglass batting).

I've since had to turn this smallish attic space into a virtual closet through the addition of cloth covered wardrobes along one vertical wall. Last winter, and it was an unusually snowy one, I had some pretty noticeable ice dams on that section of the roof. In previous years, it was not that noticeable, icicles yes, dams no. I've decided to blame it on the increased walk in traffic of the attic space. (daily in the morning by the wife to grab whatever)

I've done some reading, and I'm wondering about the relative value/efficiency/convenience of putting up 'reflectix' all along the single pitched roof side of the attic versus putting up higher R value fiberglass rolls. Will I likely see enough insulating effect with just reflectix to relieve the ice dam formation, or should I break down and do the somewhat annoy/messy fiberglass rolls between the roof joists?
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Old 10-08-2008, 12:12 PM   #8
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Reflectix insulation


Radiant heat goes right through insulation. You use Reflectix for its reflecting ability, not its R-value.

I've used it and it is worth it to keep the top floor cooler in the summer.
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Old 11-15-2008, 10:44 PM   #9
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Reflectix insulation


Just installed it, not for its insulative value but more for its reflective properties-- to help cool the house. Actually, I'm at 80% completion but right away I noticed how my A/C has yet to kick in. It's been in the mid 80's (F) this week. Working in the attic is not only bearable but down right comfortable during midday! I'm now looking forward to another scorching summer next year and NOT paying the huge electrical bills of years past!
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Old 11-15-2008, 11:03 PM   #10
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Reflectix insulation


The house that I live in was built in 1948!
The walls and ceilings had gypsum panels nailed to the studs and joists. Then a scratch coat of plaster and a putty coat were plastered onto the panels. These panels were 16"X48".
On the reverse side was an aluminum foil.
No other insulation was used in the walls, although some fibre glass insulation was installed in the attic.
This house was hard to heat and there were signs that previous owners had made attempts to improve the situation.
When I bought the house, I had an insulating contractor come in and blow cellulose into the walls and another R20 fibre glass in the attic.
The cellulose ( R12/14) has made enough improvement to give a pay-back in two heating seasons.
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Old 06-11-2010, 11:38 AM   #11
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Reflectix insulation


I purchased a bunch of this. I live in FL in a two story home so anything to help me save on AC is great. I was planning to install it, stapled up to the roof joists in the attic. The attic floor is insulated with batt (I'll probably add more). There wont be any insulation up between the roof joists. I planned to staple the product across the wooden joists... there would the shingled roof, wafer board, the roof joists and then my stapled reflectix. Am I going about this the right way? I think so.. I believe i just stop a couple of inches up from the soffits to still allow airflow. There are long roof ridge vents also. Any recommendations? I just want to make sure I don't cause any issues.

THanks,

Mike

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