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Old 12-10-2008, 09:28 AM   #1
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>>Questions for the Builders/Carpenters<<


Here's my background:

I went to Southeastern Regional and graduated in Construction Technology. Graduated with 1500 hours there, and I was on co-op with a guy doing remodeling and I had 271 hours there. In March of 09 I will be attending New England Technical Institute and I will be majoring in Building Construction/Cabinetmaking, so I can get my Associates in Science Degree. I also have a 10 hour Construction health and safety card from OSHA. I'm really going to school so I can refresh my memory in Carpentry, get a degree to fall back on, and I also want to own my own remodeling company in the upcoming future. I say refresh my memory because i haven't worked with a carpenter for about a year or so. I did laminate flooring all by myself in my house, the room is 26' x 14'. I noticed I still had some skills and I really don't mind doing that kind of work so I decided to go to school for it. And I'll also have a degree which I've always wanted. I'm pretty young, only 19 years old. I'm very focused and I know what I want.

My questions:

After graduation when will i qualify to get a Home improvement Contractor license?
With all that background I have, could I land a pretty good job after graduation? www.neit.edu < my schools website, go to building construction/cabinetmaking and see what I learn.
If I ever wanted my own remodeling company what kind of licensing should I look in to?
Someone that has there own small business already going you think they would hire someone like me?

Be helpful if any of you guys could answer those questions for me. I'll pretty much know everything there is to know about a house after graduation. Just take a look at that website and tell me what you think.

Thank you guys very much

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Old 12-10-2008, 02:01 PM   #2
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>>Questions for the Builders/Carpenters<<


Depends upon the requirments where you live.

My opinion, and dont take this peronally, text books are no substitute for on the job experience. I have worked on a lot of jobs where they have some guy running the show that had a degree but didnt know a dam thing.
School is great and more people should go but you have to pick up a hammer and saw and build for a few years before you can become a carpenter. Even then Ive seen many guys who still didnt know much of anything.
If you can gp to work for somebody who does the type of work that you want to make a living at. Learn on his dime so you dont end up paying for the costly mistakes out of you pocket.
There are 10 ways to build the same house. Experience is the key. On the job, ask lots of 'why do you do this' questions, if the person your working for cant answer then go to work for some one else.
Knowing who to do something is good, but knowing why you do it a certain why is better. It will increase your problem solving skills. Learn to always think ahead. What your going to do next, or what has to be done to complete the job.
good luck

PS I see your in NE, my experience is they tend to be more quality oriented up there, but a bit slow.
Learn it right, then learn it fast. If you do it vise versa you will never be good.


Last edited by SNC; 12-10-2008 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:05 PM   #3
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>>Questions for the Builders/Carpenters<<


Quote:
Originally Posted by UpComingBuilder View Post
After graduation when will i qualify to get a Home improvement Contractor license?
In MA: There is no such thing as a Home Improvement Contractor License. It is a Home Improvement Contractor "registration". There is no test. It is a means of tracking and having a history of each and every Home Improvement Contractor operating/doing business in MA. It involves registering, paying a fee, and renewing yearly. You are assigned an H.I.C. registration number. That number is not a license. More information here: http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eopsterm...hic&csid=Eeops

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Originally Posted by UpComingBuilder View Post
With all that background I have, could I land a pretty good job after graduation?
A person's background will not always "land" them a job. This is the Construction Industry. You have to start at the bottom, no matter how much schooling and education you have.
Example: I have a buddy with over 20 years of major onsite framing/building/remodeling experience, including a bacheler's in Architectural Design. He approached a local company that he has done work for (building for them, to apply for a job as a project manager). They told him he'd have to start at ground level to prove himself first. That it could take several years, for him to work his way up....

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpComingBuilder View Post
If I ever wanted my own remodeling company what kind of licensing should I look in to?
Licensing laws in MA have recently changed, and are continuing to change. Unrestricted Class Construction Supervisor and Restricted Class Construction Superviser. There are now 4 specialty licenses under the CS licenses. If you want to know more, look it up here: http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eopsterm...nse&csid=Eeops

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpComingBuilder View Post
Someone that has there own small business already going you think they would hire someone like me?
No. Im not intending to be mean, or sarcastic. I'm being honost. The Construction and Remodeling industry is about "production" ..... "producing work"......& producing good work, and doing so efficiently.....
It takes real world, real job...experience. It takes the knowledge of how to make lemonade out of lemons. You don't learn that in a classroom. You learn it on job sites.

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Originally Posted by UpComingBuilder View Post
Be helpful if any of you guys could answer those questions for me. I'll pretty much know everything there is to know about a house after graduation.
Again, I don't intend to be mean, but you WILL NOT know every thing there is to know about houses, from classes alone. You will still have a long way to go. It's like a rookie cop, fresh out of the acadamy....a new army recruit, fresh out of boot camp....a rookie fire-fighter, fresh out of training, etc.
After graduation, you will still have a long way to go, my young and idealistic friend.

Poke around at the Mass.Gov site to get more info:
http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eopsmodu...age&csid=Eeops

Also, another very helpful site is this one: http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eopsmodu...age&csid=Eeops

BTW - I give you alot of credit. The fact that you know what you want to do, and have a passion for it, along with goals (at 19) is very commendable. Keep working hard, and learning. This will take time, be patient, the most valuable education you will get, over time, is personal experience. They don't teach that in any schools.
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:59 PM   #4
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I missed the part about being 19. You have lots of time. Forget about your own company for a few years and work for several different companies, get different views. The union apprentiship is 4 years of school and working.
spend your 20s learning the trade, accumulate equipment, after 2 or 3 years maybe pick up some small side jobs, pay attention to how long it takes to do them.
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Old 12-11-2008, 10:10 AM   #5
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No offense taken at all. I understand everything you guys are telling me. Damn, now I'm thinking is school even worth it. But then again if I ever did own my own company, If i had my degree, after working 20-30 years my degree would get me a manager job or estimating job because of the experience from my own personal business. My tuition is pretty high, I'm paying 35,000$ for the 2 years there. So after I graduate its possible I could make 10/hr again like I was during high school? Yeah I wouldn't know everything lol, shouldn't of posted that.. So pretty much after I graduate its possible I couldn't even get job. Everything they teach us in school they make us do a lab. One of my first classes is House framing 1, then they have house framing 2, which is the lab. I wouldn't even go to school if they didn't show us what they were talking about. I thought I had to accumulate a lot of hours to get a license of some sort. Yeah actual experience is the best education I can get, While in high school I was in Construction Tech for 3 years, I learned some things but I learned more working with a guy for 5 months. I actualy learned more with that guy in 5 months then I did in 3 years at school. I wish I stayed with him, Would of been almost 2 years with him now. But I was 17 at the time, I was too immature to keep a full time job, too bad I couldn't turn back the hands of time. Again though, seeing as my tuition is very high for the shool 10/hr again wouldn't cut it, got to pay back my student loans :/. As for tools, if I get money for birthdays or even christmas, idk if I'm getting presents this year but It'll go to power tools. I'm just shooting for the stars, every boss I've had are just like blahh, mean and everthing. I can deal but I want my own company some day so I don't have somebody always down my back for something. It's my dream to have my name outside of houses like Marsden Remodeling or something lol, If I could ever see that one day I'll be one happy camper.
After all that lol, is school for me a good investment or..?
Thanks though, alot of my friends don't even know what they want to do, I'm only 19, 20 in July. I have alot of dreams I want to accomidate, want to have my on household someday with a family. Owning my own business in my mind would get me where I want to be when the time comes. Thank you guys for even reading my post.

- Tim Marsden
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Old 12-11-2008, 11:03 AM   #6
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>>Questions for the Builders/Carpenters<<


Upcomingbuilder,

I admire your spunk and energy, reminds me of myself when I entered collage. I went to school for 5 years, got my degree and became a Physical Therapist. I thouhgt I knew it all until I got out into the real world. These guys are 100% correct. You need real world experience to build on your schooling. Now that Ive worked in the field for 9 years Im getting comfortable with all the experinece Ive picked up working multiple jobs at all different kinds of settings.

My advice even though I am not in the contruction industry is get the schooling, education is a good thing, then get out there and get real world on the job experience working alongside others that know the craft and learn,learn,learn. After awhile you will then realize how the textbook things you learn work in the real world and why they do. Dont limit yourself to one job. Travel, work different settings/areas and work with lots of different people while you are young, it will pay off big time for your future.
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Old 12-11-2008, 12:23 PM   #7
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>>Questions for the Builders/Carpenters<<


Tim,
Get the schooling. Then get out and get the experience, to add to the schooling, and complete the formula...
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Old 12-11-2008, 01:03 PM   #8
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>>Questions for the Builders/Carpenters<<


Thank you guys very much for the advice. I will listen.
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Old 12-11-2008, 01:43 PM   #9
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I agree, finish your school.
As for the mean bosses, that can be a good thing in the long run. When I was a beginner I had a coupe of real a holes. I remember one day I had a splinter in my hand and the guy told me to mark it with my keel and get it out during break time, .
Those guys that work you real hard, it will pay off later in your career. Kind of like boot camp in the Army.
There are going to be days you hate this work, but if its what you want to do, get good at it.
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Old 12-11-2008, 03:38 PM   #10
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haha, yeah theres been alot of days I've hated this kind of work. Almost wanted to give up. But it's what I know, don't know electrical,plumbing, or hvac. Just strictly building/carpentry. I'm smart enough to get a stupid desk job that takes 4 years of collage, but I get too bored sitting on a computer. I want to be outside lol. I want to get good at this, no hope for me. Hope is the beginning of failure. My life's already planned out, I'm just playing my cards. If I play them right, I will be succesful. My last boss I swear one day he was going to hit me, he was on 4 ft ladder(when I was doing electrical work for a company) and him weighing almost 275 pounds one little move you could almost fall off that. He grabbed a wire and started to pull, pulled too hard and almost busted his @ss. Some reason put his hands in my face. Sometimes bosses go too far, if I ever become one I've seen many mistakes they do, and why they lose employees. I left that company, and so did his best journeymen. Sucks though, I'm kind of sensitive so if a boss or even my father yells at me for some reason It hurts me lolol. But all in all, one day I will eventually get myself started into my own business.

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