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Old 06-05-2008, 11:53 AM   #1
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Proper layering for rural driveway


Finally finished clearing the area of our vacant land to be the driveway, there are some small mounds we'll level of and a few holes we'll fill in with the Bobcat this weekend. Once we get it roughly flat, how should we proceed with making it suitable for a gravel driveway? My understanding was fill and then gravel, but now I'm hearing there is different types of gravel, sometimes you add a layer of sand, so on and so forth. Experiences?

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Old 06-05-2008, 03:08 PM   #2
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Proper layering for rural driveway


My experience, you need a proper base. Our old stone driveway was sinking (150'x15'). I had an excavator replace ours. They removed the top 6-8" of material, relocated it to a low spot and regraded, installed geotextile fabric, installed about 80 ton of a crusher run, compacted and top dressed with a 3/4"-. They excavated, relocated and rough graded the spoils and installed the fabric the first day (6 hours) and finished in 3 hours on the second day. In 2003 I paid $3500. My cost for materials alone would have been around 1500. Even though I have a small TBL and could have done the job, I estimated my time as 7-10 days of solid work, with good weather and with the wear and tear of my machine I paid.
All in all I got a solid drive and a good deal.

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Old 06-05-2008, 03:17 PM   #3
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Proper layering for rural driveway


WOW! Fortunately, we only have about 20 yards that needs to be finished so I'm not sweating doing it ourselves. Let me see if I read your layering correcty: you regraded dirt to get it flat, then put down the fabric, then crushed stone, then 3/4" gravel? When finished how high is the gravel layer raised above the surrounding ground? (I ask for drainage reasons) Thanks!
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Old 06-05-2008, 06:32 PM   #4
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Proper layering for rural driveway


It probably depends on where your at as to how it is typically done. I'm cheap and wasn't in a big hurry and this worked very well for me. I built up the drive about 2-4" using dirt from a drainage ditch I cut down one side of my property. Let it rain on it a few times and pack it by driving on it after it dries up just enough to not rut it up. Around here we top it with several inches of limestone or crushed concrete. I did about 1300' of driveway like this and it's held up to cement trucks pretty well with just minor repairs after pouring my garage and house. I wouldn't recommend spending too much on it till after your done building. The cement and dump trucks will just tear up your nice driveway if you don't wait.

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Old 06-05-2008, 07:45 PM   #5
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Proper layering for rural driveway


Depending on the type of dirt you should remove a good protion of it. Then fill the hole with gravel.

Some links
http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/Drive.htm

http://www.askthebuilder.com/698_Bui...Driveway.shtml
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Old 06-06-2008, 07:26 AM   #6
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Proper layering for rural driveway


The stone is retained on both sides of the drive with short 1" exposed retaining walls. On one side of the drive we have a hill and on the other side I ran 4" Schedule 40 PVC pipe starting at 8" and sloped toward the front ditch. I drilled holes in the pipe. I used the Sch. 40 because that's the access to my back yard for equipment. The driveway slopes 1-1" across the 15' from the hill towards the pipe. They didn't put that much pitch on the driveway because of all the stone they replaced.
The height of the stone is at grade and the short exposed walls prevents mixing.

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