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-   -   Possible that this wall is load-bearing? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/possible-wall-load-bearing-188331/)

RyanD 10-09-2013 05:21 PM

Possible that this wall is load-bearing?
 
So we have plans to renovate the downstairs in our split and I just assumed that there were lally columns so we had the plans done for an open concept. Now I'm not so sure. The walls are thicker than usual but I figured they did that to accommodate the columns but the four holes I punched I couldn't see any and it got me thinking that maybe the center wall is load-bearing and there are no columns. Could this be the case, could this wall hold up the entire upstairs?

Here is the layout as it stands now.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/...18.00%20PM.png

md2lgyk 10-09-2013 06:20 PM

So which wall are you talking about? And how much "thicker than usual" is it? If just a bit, it could be a plumbing wall framed with 2x6s instead of 2x4s. My log house has only one interior load-bearing wall, and it is the same thickness as all the rest. Same for other houses I have owned.

sixeightten 10-09-2013 06:30 PM

You need to pop the hole up high so you can see if there is a beam. The lolly columns would have to be holding up a beam anyway right?

I have seen a few of these that utilized a strip footer and a bearing wall.

RyanD 10-09-2013 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1251595)
So which wall are you talking about? And how much "thicker than usual" is it? If just a bit, could be a plumbing wall.

Center wall. It's not plumbing, it's about 1.5 thick.

I cut a few more holes and found them. Now I can rip the walls down. :-)

danpik 10-10-2013 05:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RyanD (Post 1251605)
Center wall. It's not plumbing, it's about 1.5 thick.

inch and a half or foot and a half?

oh'mike 10-10-2013 06:17 AM

You need to get someone on site to look at that----I've never seen columns inside of a wall on the first floor.

TarheelTerp 10-10-2013 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RyanD (Post 1251584)
So we have plans to renovate the (already remodeled basement) downstairs in our split and I just assumed that there were lally columns

The walls are thicker than usual but I figured they did that to accommodate the columns but ...

There probably isn't more than one or two columns (and the beam).
Visit your neighbor with similar homes. See where theirs are.

Quote:

Could this be the case, could this wall hold up the entire upstairs?
That's possible too.
Not likely... but possible.

danpik 10-10-2013 01:25 PM

Just thought of something...Is this a modular? What is in the basement directly under this wall? got any general shots of the outside of the house you could post that show the end wall? How about the inside where this wall is

GBrackins 10-11-2013 11:53 AM

I'm guessing whoever did your plans did not determine if this was a load bearing wall? I'd get them back out there if it were me.

is there a beam under that wall in the basement with lally columns? do the ceiling joists/2nd floor joists terminate over that wall? if so then it's load bearing.

it is uncommon in my experience in Massachusetts that a beam with columns would be installed to support loads above and then build a partition wall to fill in below the beam. Of course I have found those conditions in post-and-beam homes, but as I said it has not been a common occurance on my part.

Where in Mass are you?

ToolSeeker 10-11-2013 02:14 PM

If this is a one story with truss I would think yes it's load bearing.


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