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Old 03-02-2012, 06:05 PM   #16
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Popcorn Ceiling Rant...


I started late. My eldest is 16. What a storm. I am told there will emerge the same sweet personality I used to know and periodically catch a glimpse of

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Old 03-02-2012, 06:10 PM   #17
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I started late. My eldest is 16. What a storm. I am told there will emerge the same sweet personality I used to know and periodically catch a glimpse of
I feel for ya! But you'll do just fine, and before you know it you'll be where my wife & I are, scratching our heads & saying, "How the heck did that happen so fast?"
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:59 AM   #18
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Ceiling paper.....that is the way to go......assuming you have to hide some cracks.

We bought our house 12 years ago....1950's vintage...popcorn in the main room...to hide some pretty big cracks.

Scraped it all off (yea, it was a mess)....cleaned everything up and put up ceiling paper.....my wife is English so it's a common thing over there....

You can sort of see what it looks like in this pic.

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Old 03-19-2012, 05:07 AM   #19
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Hope you were careful since it could have contained asbestos.
Not good, I have stripped a number of those over the years; the texture comes off easily most of the time, but the prep and cleanup results in a long day then the next day you come back to do the plastering and painting. I've only removed one that tested negative for asbestos; that was the worst one i have done, it might have been quicker and easier to tear down the ceiling & redo the drywall on that one!
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Old 03-19-2012, 06:11 AM   #20
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What surprised me most was the fact that the ceiling was in almost perfect condition, so I can't imagine why they even sprayed that crap on there in the first place! They weren't covering cracks or other problems.

Also, the stuff was over 1/4" thick. I don't know how many "coats" that was, and cannot imagine what they were doing.

Any idea why they would have sprayed that crap on so thick?

And who was it that EVER sprayed a ceiling down with that, stepped back, and said, "Wow, that looks REALLY nice!"???


Rant done...
To answer your questions:

1. POPULARITY: Popcorn ceilings were the predominate ceiling texture for a period of time. They were most popular during the late 50's to the early 80's. See next point.

2. COST EFFICIENCY: They went up much quicker than manually applied texture patterns. Thus, they were more cost efficient, not to mention entire (new) homes could often be done in 1 day. This just wasn't the case with other types of texture. Not everyone did the following; but adding flat white latex paint to the popcorn mixture (it comes in a large bag and is mixed on-site), will allow the popcorn to dry perfectly white and "finished" (no need to paint). This also eliminated the cost and time of painting the ceilings in a new build.

3. DIFFERENT TYPES OF POPCORN: There are essentially 3 types of popcorn mixture (bagged); fine, medium & heavy (QT). In addition, how the dry product was prepared and mixed was on-site (if less water was used), can create a heavier consistency, and thus a heavier application. Generally, the person that applied it, mixed it to a consistency that they were used to (as well). Example of different kinds of popcorn (bagged): http://www.usg.com/sheetrock-ceiling...l#tab-features

EVEN & CONSISTENT APPLICATION
: Using a thicker mix, and/or applying it on the thicker side isn't always about "hiding" any defects in/on the ceiling(s), its also about hiding the spray pattern lines (and making it all blend-in with an even consistency).

4. BE SAFE: Be careful in removing older popcorn ceilings (Structures built prior to 1978) - because they likely contain asbestos (which in part, contributed to popcorn texture waning from its original popularity). Obviously, since 1978, popcorn texture materials still existed, but they did not (and do not currently) contain asbestos in the mixtures.


FWIW - Although I don't much care for popcorn, we are in fact guilty of applying many, many of the much-praised & beloved popcorn ceilings during the 80's and into the 90's (all over New England) .

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Old 03-22-2012, 08:03 AM   #21
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FWIW - Although I don't much care for popcorn, we are in fact guilty of applying many, many of the much-praised & beloved popcorn ceilings during the 80's and into the 90's (all over New England) .
So it's all YOUR fault!
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Old 04-11-2012, 03:58 PM   #22
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popcorn sucks. its old and outdated. gets dirty. its hard to clean once it is dirty.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:02 AM   #23
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something to keep in mind is every generation has its "Must Have" decorator touches. I can't count the number of houses I have removed 1/4" thick layers of wallpaper, cheap paneling, Black vinyl tile floors etc, etc, etc. My personal thoughts on current trends is Travertine Tile will be the next "what were they thinking" as well as knock down finish on walls and ceilings.

I remember a few years ago the trend in kitchens was the whitewash finish on cabinets sometimes refered to as pickleing. It looked like a white stain for those that never saw it. Two weeks ago I tore out all of the cabinets in one of these kitchens that was done in 1995 and replaced them with a non stained clear finished maple cabinet. Fortunatly I did not have to trash the old ones and they found a nice home by someone that thought they still looked good.

what else are we doing today that will be looked down upon 20, 30, 40 or more years from now?
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Old 04-12-2012, 11:04 AM   #24
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something to keep in mind is every generation has its "Must Have" decorator touches. I can't count the number of houses I have removed 1/4" thick layers of wallpaper, cheap paneling, Black vinyl tile floors etc, etc, etc. My personal thoughts on current trends is Travertine Tile will be the next "what were they thinking" as well as knock down finish on walls and ceilings.

I remember a few years ago the trend in kitchens was the whitewash finish on cabinets sometimes refered to as pickleing. It looked like a white stain for those that never saw it. Two weeks ago I tore out all of the cabinets in one of these kitchens that was done in 1995 and replaced them with a non stained clear finished maple cabinet. Fortunatly I did not have to trash the old ones and they found a nice home by someone that thought they still looked good.

what else are we doing today that will be looked down upon 20, 30, 40 or more years from now?
When my wife & I bought our current home, it had the pickled cabinet & cupboard doors. Blehhh...

"Everything Cutesy Country" has certainly gone by the wayside, as have wide wallpaper borders.

And I think you're right about travertine tile being an inevitable "has been." But I think I'd add to that list a lot of the trendy decorative and border glass accent tiles. Many of the current kitchen backsplashes will be coming down within the next 5 years. And I'm sure that color preferences will change soon.
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:46 PM   #25
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I will have to agree on the glass tile back splashes. When I first saw them in the stores a couple years ago, I thought it was pretty neet looking stuff. Now after seeing it for a couple years now I don't quite feel that way anymore.

I have a 50's pink tile bathroom in my house that is destined to come out someday. I hate to because whoever did the work was a real Pro and the tile is in great shape. I just can't deal with the color anymore.
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Old 04-18-2012, 07:03 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by danpik View Post
something to keep in mind is every generation has its "Must Have" decorator touches. I can't count the number of houses I have removed 1/4" thick layers of wallpaper, cheap paneling, Black vinyl tile floors etc, etc, etc. My personal thoughts on current trends is Travertine Tile will be the next "what were they thinking" as well as knock down finish on walls and ceilings.

I remember a few years ago the trend in kitchens was the whitewash finish on cabinets sometimes refered to as pickleing. It looked like a white stain for those that never saw it. Two weeks ago I tore out all of the cabinets in one of these kitchens that was done in 1995 and replaced them with a non stained clear finished maple cabinet. Fortunatly I did not have to trash the old ones and they found a nice home by someone that thought they still looked good.

what else are we doing today that will be looked down upon 20, 30, 40 or more years from now?

I feel the same way about slick finish. who wants a boring flat wall.

The only downside of knockdown is it can be difficult to match. most people like it but like everything there is a trend. Kind of like bell bottoms!

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