Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-01-2007, 04:22 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

pipe leak & sheetrock damage


I had a water leak from a pipe over one of my bedrooms. A plumber has come out and put a clamp over the hole in the pipe. I've had water accumulate on the sheetrock for about 5 hours, but I don't believe the leak continued for all 5 hours.

My question is this: should I punch a hole in the sheetrock? There won't be any water to pour out, the leak was small and slow. However, I can tell that the sheetrock has been saturated through. It has not started to bulge yet.

Any feedback is appreciated

santogr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2007, 05:58 PM   #2
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Rewards Points: 0
Default

pipe leak & sheetrock damage


Quote:
Originally Posted by santogr View Post
I had a water leak from a pipe over one of my bedrooms. A plumber has come out and put a clamp over the hole in the pipe. I've had water accumulate on the sheetrock for about 5 hours, but I don't believe the leak continued for all 5 hours.

My question is this: should I punch a hole in the sheetrock? There won't be any water to pour out, the leak was small and slow. However, I can tell that the sheetrock has been saturated through. It has not started to bulge yet.

Any feedback is appreciated
We do alot of water damage repairs from leaking pipes. Currently, we are doing repairs at two different apartment complexes (6 units) due to leaking pipes.

Punching a small hole in it to 'drain' will not allow it to 'dry'....You really should cut out the area of sheetrock that got wet. Start off cutting out a 1'x1' to 2'x2' square. Draw it out as a perfect square - so it will be easier to replace and repair later (once it has dried out).
If the damaged area ends up being larger than 2'x2', cut out a larger 'square' or rectangle..... If the sheetrock is just slightly damp but not mush (saging, soft), you can leave the hole open for several days to dry out.
If you have access to a moisture meter, use it 'test' the surrounding sheetrock (including the adjacent walls) for moisture. Remember that water runs downwards, not just on the ceiling it is above.

Below is an example of:

1.) A rectanguler cut-out on the ceiling.
2.) How other areas, besides the ceiling (the walls) are affected by the downward flow of water....




(I took these on 02/28/07 - hallway view of one damaged apartment unit's entry area)


Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 03-01-2007 at 06:27 PM.
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2007, 01:44 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2,083
Rewards Points: 0
Default

pipe leak & sheetrock damage


Is there enough damage for an insurance claim?
redline is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Replacement pipe for hot water heat? Tmb9862 HVAC 18 01-12-2007 03:31 PM
Leaking waste pipe guvlin444 Plumbing 5 09-30-2006 01:36 PM
Need to support 15th of ABS pipe irishtimes101 Plumbing 3 09-01-2006 11:09 AM
Vent Pipe Leak romeguy1 Plumbing 9 12-11-2005 12:08 AM
Leak at flange and drain pipe tallycat77 Plumbing 1 07-26-2005 08:32 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.