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Old 03-20-2009, 07:58 PM   #16
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Patio and external door opinions


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Originally Posted by ckellyusa View Post
where do you guys rank pella?

Pella Proline found at Lowes does not rank in the top five for Patio Doors--

Andersen
Marvin
Eagle
Koble/Koble
Weathershield
then
Pella
Peachtree
Crestline
If your looking at Designer Series Pella then possilby third...

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Old 03-22-2009, 09:16 AM   #17
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Patio and external door opinions


Emily

I notice that you list Thermatru as your top choice. I have been asking arround locally and their name keeps comming up as a top entry way door company. They only make fiberglass entryway doors. Why would you recommend wood as the best choice for patio doors and windows yet not for entry way doors? Maybe I am intepreting your posts incorrectly.
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Old 03-24-2009, 07:21 PM   #18
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Patio and external door opinions


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Emily

I notice that you list Thermatru as your top choice. I have been asking arround locally and their name keeps comming up as a top entry way door company. They only make fiberglass entryway doors. Why would you recommend wood as the best choice for patio doors and windows yet not for entry way doors? Maybe I am intepreting your posts incorrectly.
Therma Tru-fiberglass door is tops-polyurethane core-well insultated Therma tru makes steel doors also-I like the fiberglass/u-factors
Steel has a polystrene core-which is not as well insulated

Andersen Patio Doors-because of construction of the door and how it is assembled - and you can get it factory assembled from A/W-
Wood is nature best insulator-steel capped track-thermally broken sill-adjustable dual tandum rollers-interior options Oak-Maple-Pine-hardware options
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Old 03-26-2009, 01:45 PM   #19
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Patio and external door opinions


I'm frequently hired to diagnose water intrusion problems at patio doors, and the most important factor is the quality of installation, not the quality of the door. A relatively "low quality" door properly installed is far more likely perform adequately in terms of preventing water intrusion (which is by far the most frequent serious problems with these doors) than the best quality door you can buy if it's incorrectly installed.

The exact installation technique required depends on the wall material, and the toughest jobs to do properly are retrofits into walls with multiple layers of cladding, for example vinyl siding over wood, especially if the outer layer of siding has not been installed properly (for example, the required water resistant barrier material has been omitted). Stucco is another material where an inexperienced or careless installer can create problems.

The door manufacture will provide installation instructions, but these will typically address installations in new construction, and while they may cover some recommended flashing details they typically will not cover the specific techniques required at the junctions of the wall cladding with the door - that's specific to the cladding, and often to the details of a specific installation.

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Home Inspection: "A business with illogically high liability, slim profit margins and limited economies of scale. An incredibly diverse, multi-disciplined consulting service, delivered under difficult in-field circumstances, before a hostile audience in an impossibly short time frame, requiring the production of an extraordinarily detailed technical report, almost instantly, without benefit of research facilities or resources." - Alan Carson
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Old 03-26-2009, 01:53 PM   #20
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Patio and external door opinions


Not factoring in the high cost, is wood still the best choice for entry doors? I see that some are very nice but a nice solid oak door is 2-3X the cost of a good fiberglass door.
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Old 03-26-2009, 08:30 PM   #21
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Not factoring in the high cost, is wood still the best choice for entry doors? I see that some are very nice but a nice solid oak door is 2-3X the cost of a good fiberglass door.
I would recommend a Cladded Wood door if your after an entry door. Most only have 1 year warranty. I hope any one using a wood door, would have a overhang, or receed entry way. There are so many real nice expensive wood doors out there, KML by Andersen, IWP Jeld Wen, and Preachtree. But read the fine print.....
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Old 03-27-2009, 08:00 AM   #22
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Patio and external door opinions


Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Thomas View Post
I'm frequently hired to diagnose water intrusion problems at patio doors, and the most important factor is the quality of installation, not the quality of the door. A relatively "low quality" door properly installed is far more likely perform adequately in terms of preventing water intrusion (which is by far the most frequent serious problems with these doors) than the best quality door you can buy if it's incorrectly installed.

The exact installation technique required depends on the wall material, and the toughest jobs to do properly are retrofits into walls with multiple layers of cladding, for example vinyl siding over wood, especially if the outer layer of siding has not been installed properly (for example, the required water resistant barrier material has been omitted). Stucco is another material where an inexperienced or careless installer can create problems.

The door manufacture will provide installation instructions, but these will typically address installations in new construction, and while they may cover some recommended flashing details they typically will not cover the specific techniques required at the junctions of the wall cladding with the door - that's specific to the cladding, and often to the details of a specific installation.

---------
Home Inspection: "A business with illogically high liability, slim profit margins and limited economies of scale. An incredibly diverse, multi-disciplined consulting service, delivered under difficult in-field circumstances, before a hostile audience in an impossibly short time frame, requiring the production of an extraordinarily detailed technical report, almost instantly, without benefit of research facilities or resources." - Alan Carson
Excellent post.

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