DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   General DIY Discussions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/)
-   -   Order of remodeling, critique my list...& lets talk. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/order-remodeling-critique-my-list-lets-talk-97604/)

Do It Right 03-07-2011 07:15 PM

Order of remodeling, critique my list...& lets talk.
 
I originally posted this order of remodeling as an answer last week.
I would like to hear pro's, cons, or add your ideas/steps to it.
Remodeling 101, as I see it.....(assuming you've already come up with a well thought-out plan)
Set-up.....
1) Get a permit for work that needs to be inspected.
2) Line up your means of disposal for what you're removing.
Truck/dumpster/etc, making a pile of debris in the yard will just give you twice the amount of work when you have to move it again.
3) Protection of rooms outside of where your working from damage from entering and leaving with construction materials, tools, etc.
4) Personal protection for you from dust/lead/etc.

Work......
1) Gut ceiling, walls and floor.
2) Rough wiring, followed by inspection.
Entertainment wiring if any.
Air conditioning vents/returns if being installed.
Rough-in heating pipes (circ hot water/radiant).
Ventilation of roof, ridge vent, roof vents, etc.(if room is cathedral-ceiling)
Correct subflooring issues, levelness, squeaks, etc.
3) Insulation, spray foam, fiberglass, etc. followed by inspection.
4) Ceiling blue board/plaster or sheetrock/joint compound.
5) Walls (same)
6) New floor.
7) (protect floor) Paint
8) Finish...install radiators, a/c grills, finish electrical, etc.
9) Doors/woodwork/window trim.
10) Final inspections.
11) Clean up/dispose of all the trash.
12) Sit back, have a few beers, and enjoy that feeling of accomplishment.

7,8,&9 don't have to be in that order, I find it easier to paint before woodwork, some save the paint till the very end.

One other note....
Avoiding the permits is the worst thing any homeowner can do.
If the question EVER arises if you got a permit (whether it's from an assessor, home-inspection for a buyer, or insurance claim) you want the answer to be YES.
I've been in the construction trades for 30+ years and the worst scenarios I've seen have always come about due to lack of permits.

Let's hear your thoughts.....

Willie T 03-07-2011 07:39 PM

Just a few points right now....

I originally posted this order of remodeling as an answer last week.
I would like to hear pro's, cons, or add your ideas/steps to it.
Remodeling 101, as I see it.....(assuming you've already come up with a well thought-out plan)
Set-up.....
1) Get a permit for work that needs to be inspected.
2) Line up your means of disposal for what you're removing.
Order your Cabinets, vanities, and any other specialty items well ahead of time.
Have it all on hand to use for pre-measuring for fit.
Truck/dumpster/etc, making a pile of debris in the yard will just give you twice the amount of work when you have to move it again.
3) Protection of rooms outside of where your working from damage from entering and leaving with construction materials, tools, etc.
4) Personal protection for you from dust/lead/etc.

Work......
Turn off electric and water that will be affected by any demo you do.
1) Gut ceiling, walls and floor.
Check for damaged wood… mold or insects.
2) Rough wiring, followed by inspection.
Entertainment wiring if any.
Air conditioning vents/returns if being installed.
Rough-in heating pipes (circ hot water/radiant).
Ventilation of roof, ridge vent, roof vents, etc.(if room is cathedral-ceiling)
Correct subflooring issues, levelness, squeaks, etc.
3) Insulation, spray foam, fiberglass, etc. followed by inspection.
4) Ceiling blue board/plaster or sheetrock/joint compound.
5) Walls (same)
Prime walls and ceiling before any flooring or trim goes in.
6) New floor.
7) (protect floor) Paint
8) Finish...install radiators, a/c grills, finish electrical, etc.
9) Doors/woodwork/window trim. Baseboard all needs to be installed (1/2” high) for carpet prior to installing carpet. Doors can wait to be cut off later.
10) Final inspections.
11) Clean up/dispose of all the trash.
12) Sit back, have a few beers, and enjoy that feeling of accomplishment.

7,8,&9 don't have to be in that order, I find it easier to paint before woodwork, some save the paint till the very end.

One other note....
Avoiding the permits is the worst thing any homeowner can do.
If the question EVER arises if you got a permit (whether it's from an assessor, home-inspection for a buyer, or insurance claim) you want the answer to be YES.
I've been in the construction trades for 30+ years and the worst scenarios I've seen have always come about due to lack of permits.

Let's hear your thoughts.....

Willie T 03-07-2011 07:44 PM

One more point. Don't get cheap for the few dollars it will cost to go ahead and fully install flooring under all cabinets and vanities. Baseboard behind your range and your refrigerator.

If your ceiling and walls are going to be different colors, make sure you provide a smooth surface at the 90 degree transition. Cutting in bumpy wall tops is hell for even a pro, let alone a DIY.

Do It Right 03-08-2011 05:09 AM

Appreciate the input Willie...all good points.
I'll add another one,

Prior to boarding bathroom walls, install blocking between studs where bath accessories are going to be installed.
Towel rods, paper & brush holders always seem to loosen over time when mounted only into the wall board.

oh'mike 03-08-2011 06:46 AM

All good advice---as to painting---Add 'touch up drywall taping after priming'

Depending on the situation--I often fully paint the ceiling and put on the first coat of wall paint before installing floors,trim and cabinets.

ThatDaveGuy 03-08-2011 06:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 604844)
..(assuming you've already come up with a well thought-out plan)

Not to nitpick but this is often just accepted as a given, but you really need to have actual, thorough plans before doing anything else. People tend to say "Oh, I know what I want, kinda like ________" but when the rubber meets the road that is just a headache waiting to happen.

Actual blueprints or equivalent for the finished results, give some forethought to moving cabinets, appliances, etc., ahead of time because you can build in bottlenecks, etc.,etc..... The more thinking you do ahead of time the easier the process.

I know the overwhelming majority of posters here know this, but some new DIYers might benefit from a gentle reminder.

JCarsten 03-09-2011 01:50 PM

"2) Rough wiring, followed by inspection.
Entertainment wiring if any.
Air conditioning vents/returns if being installed."

Heat/ air ducts first, then plumbing, THEN electrical.
Go biggest to smallest.

Also don't see any beer drinking!:laughing:

Maintenance 6 03-10-2011 06:47 AM

Invert the order of items in #2. Pipes and ducts first. They aren't as flexible in placement. And of those, drain lines are first. They usually have a specific route (downhill). Wiring can run around to avoid those items.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:08 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved