Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-25-2007, 10:43 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 161
Share |
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Hi everyone. We have 3 bedrooms on the 2nd floor of our townhouse. The master and spare are perfectly fine temperature-wise. However, the baby's room is always a fair amount cooler and we can't figure out why.

We've sealed the windows in both the spare and the baby's rooms with the clear shrink plastic -- didn't help the baby's room. We put foam gaskets behind all exterior wall plugs and outlets -- no change there, either. We have experimented with keeping the baby's door open or closed at night, and there still isn't much change.

The baby's room sits on the NW corner of the house and the window faces west. The spare room sits on the SW corner of the house and the window also faces west.

What else can we try (aside from a space heater in that room) to even out the temperatures? We have a feeling that the cooler temperatures are causing our daughter to wake up too often at night because she's uncomfortable.

Thanks.
Eric
PS: We're located in Ottawa, ON, and the temperatures are hovering around 0*C / 32*F right now. We fear the difference between rooms will only get greater when the winter really sets in.

Last edited by curls00; 11-25-2007 at 10:44 AM. Reason: additional info.
curls00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 10:59 AM   #2
Electrician
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Connecticut, Litchfield
Posts: 2,015
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


What type of heat are you using? I would dampen down the warmer rooms and you should be fine, this will balance the rooms, if your using hot water baseboard close the louvers a bit in the warmer rooms, if you have duct work, then close off the vents a touch in the warmer rooms, this will take a little bit of experimenting to get it the way you want....
chris75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 11:02 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 161
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Natural gas central heating. The house is 4 years old this winter, and the furnace was tuned up this past spring by a professional.

I'll try dampening the warmer rooms to hopefully give more airflow to the cooler room. Does it matter that the baby's room (the cold room) is slightly further from the furnace than any other room in the house?

Cheers.
Eric
curls00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 11:05 AM   #4
Member
 
s0lidgr0und's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 62
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Does the line from the furnace hit the spare room or the baby's room first?
s0lidgr0und is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 11:06 AM   #5
Electrician
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Connecticut, Litchfield
Posts: 2,015
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by curls00 View Post
Natural gas central heating. The house is 4 years old this winter, and the furnace was tuned up this past spring by a professional.

I'll try dampening the warmer rooms to hopefully give more airflow to the cooler room. Does it matter that the baby's room (the cold room) is slightly further from the furnace than any other room in the house?

Cheers.
Eric
Not really, basically when they design the heating system each room requires a certain CFM, and your babies room either got miscalculated or the 2nd floor just needs to be balanced, you will be surprised what a difference it will make just by dampening off the warmer rooms...
chris75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 12:56 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 161
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by s0lidgr0und View Post
Does the line from the furnace hit the spare room or the baby's room first?
No clue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
Not really, basically when they design the heating system each room requires a certain CFM, and your babies room either got miscalculated or the 2nd floor just needs to be balanced, you will be surprised what a difference it will make just by dampening off the warmer rooms...
Hard to say if it was miscalculated -- it's a cookie-cutter house that has plenty of others just like it built at the same time. I've closed the spare bathroom vent about 75%, and noticed as well that the spare bedroom vent was 100% closed already. However, that door always stays open, whereas the baby's room the door stays closed about 12 hours a day.

We'll see how this goes. I plan to buy a few cheap thermometers to put in various rooms to truly balance the system and mark the settings on each damper for summer/winter mode. Thanks for the input!
curls00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 01:18 PM   #7
Member
 
s0lidgr0und's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 62
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


The only real experience I have ever had was when I was doing general maintenance a couples years back. One of the offices was always cold and nobody could really figure out why. My boss and I adjusted the snot out of the damper, etc. We ended up having a professional come in and he said that the office was so airtight that it didn't allow more air into the room because there was no exit for other air to leave. We installed a vent in the wall down low to the floor and everything seemed to fix itself.

I'm not saying that's the case here because I assume some architect somewhere along the line took this into account.
s0lidgr0und is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 01:24 PM   #8
Woodworker and Contractor
 
Kingfisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tampa FL
Posts: 224
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Is there an air return in every room? if not is there a gap under the doors to allow the air out? If both these are good try turning the fan to ON. This will keep the unit fan on even when it is not heating or cooling and help even all the room out temp wise, you wll need to change the filter work but its cleaning your air more too
Kingfisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 01:51 PM   #9
remodeling pro
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,399
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by curls00 View Post
No clue.



, whereas the baby's room the door stays closed about 12 hours a day.
!
This may be part of the problem also. Keeping the door closed will not make the room warmer, but will add to the temperature problem, by creating a "dead air" room. The air must be free to get pulled back through the return air, as more "new" tempature conditioned air is dumped from the register.

If dampening the other rooms a bit does not help, you need to look at how that supply lines are piped, as suggested. Often a "tee" will be used in a line instead of a "Y", and the air will naturally flow straight throught the tee, since that is the path of least resistence, starving the branch on the "tee".
troubleseeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 05:03 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 161
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by troubleseeker View Post
This may be part of the problem also. Keeping the door closed will not make the room warmer, but will add to the temperature problem, by creating a "dead air" room. The air must be free to get pulled back through the return air, as more "new" tempature conditioned air is dumped from the register.

If dampening the other rooms a bit does not help, you need to look at how that supply lines are piped, as suggested. Often a "tee" will be used in a line instead of a "Y", and the air will naturally flow straight throught the tee, since that is the path of least resistence, starving the branch on the "tee".

We have to keep the door closed from about 7pm - 7am because that's when she is sleeping, and since we have two cats that just love to cuddle, we don't want them smothering our daughter.

There are return air grilles in every room including the baby's room up high near the ceiling near the door. I assume it's near the ceiling because it's the top floor of the house, and it's placed here to catch warm, stale air from the rest of the house and return it to the furnace to be filtered and/or conditioned. Since the return air grilles on the entire top floor (all bedrooms) are like this, and this room is the only one with a problem, it's not likely because of their placement, but probably because of a lack of warm air making it to this room. I think the dampering may help and I still have to get to the store to buy a few thermometers to even out the temp. upstairs with this method.
curls00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 06:30 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 200
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Stop making those silly excuses.....
Leave the door open, and get rid of those cats....
who do you value more...your child or those cats....
JGarth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2007, 06:30 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,781
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


With the room door to the hallway open, do you actually get warm air coming out of the heating duct?

Check in the basement for manual lever controlled dampers in some or all of the individual heating ducts branching off the main duct.

With the furnace on, do you see a suction effect if you wave a strip of tissue paper near the return air grill?
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2007, 06:21 AM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 161
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JGarth View Post
Stop making those silly excuses.....
Leave the door open, and get rid of those cats....
who do you value more...your child or those cats....

Obviously you seem not to like cats. That's fine. Keep your useless comments out of my thread. Keeping a door open should NOT be a prerequisite to getting a room warm.
curls00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2007, 06:23 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 161
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
With the room door to the hallway open, do you actually get warm air coming out of the heating duct?

Check in the basement for manual lever controlled dampers in some or all of the individual heating ducts branching off the main duct.

With the furnace on, do you see a suction effect if you wave a strip of tissue paper near the return air grill?
I have tested with door open and closed and warm air does come out in both scenarios. However, since changing the damping around the house I notice MORE warm air coming out in both scenarios, so I think that definitely helped.

I'm 95% sure there are no manual levers near the furnace -- I wrapped all of the ducts I could access in the furnace room and don't recall seeing any levers of any sort.

I'll check the return air grille thing today after work. Thanks!
curls00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2007, 07:00 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 107
Default

One bedroom way too cold, others fine.


curls00-

I own a three bedroom duplex which has a problem very similar to yours....master bedroom is warmest, office is a little cooler, and spare bedroom (NW cormes w/ windows facing W)is coldest. This is what I found in my situation..... dampered the master closed about 50%, dampered office closed 25%, have spare room open 100%. Keep the door open as much as possible (i.e. when the baby is not sleeping). The main culprit in my case was how the heat duct line was run to feed the spare room. They used a piece of 6" flex duct to go from the end of the main duct line, bent the flex pipe down to go below the floor joists in the basement, went over two joist bays with the flex pipe and then bent it again to hook up to the line feeding the spare room. Every change in direction of the duct line reduces air flow. Make sure that the line feding the baby's room is as straight a shot from the main duct line as possible. Also, I have heard that you can get those booster fans (not sure the technical name for them) but they are installed in the duct line and basically boost the flow in the line. Maybe installing one of those in the line that feeds the baby's room will help boost the flow to that room...?

good luck!
DIY4EVER is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why is my bedroom is so so cold ? sunny_8 General DIY Discussions 7 04-17-2007 03:55 PM
Help with low pressure cold water upstairs lewissv Plumbing 5 01-26-2007 08:05 AM
your guestimation and or opinion on removing a bedroom shan Remodeling 2 12-09-2005 03:46 PM
how cold is too cold for vinyl siding? THEBIGPUNN Building & Construction 1 11-22-2005 10:50 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.