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-   -   NEWBIE QUESTION ALERT!! Jamb Extensions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/newbie-question-alert-jamb-extensions-100486/)

Evil Scotsman 04-04-2011 08:13 AM

NEWBIE QUESTION ALERT!! Jamb Extensions
 
Can you explain jamb extensions?! Yes I know they extend the jamb! :laughing: But I guess the question is when would you use them?! My ASSUMPTION is that they are used to bring the jamb out even with the drywall so that the trim sits flush?! Correct? But wouldn't that show a seam on the inside of the window? These would also be used (if my assumption is correct) on doors?

I know :huh:

tcleve4911 04-04-2011 08:39 AM

Your right Scot.
The extension jamb is used to bring the window or door frame flush to the wall covering.

Extension jambs are offset a 1/4 - 3/16" to the window frame and to the casing. Never Ever Flush!!!!

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...KS59d2wH2Tklvg

Willie T 04-04-2011 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcleve4911 (Post 622958)
Your right Scot.
The extension jamb is used to bring the window or door frame flush to the wall covering.

Extension jambs are offset a 1/4 - 3/16" to the window frame and to the casing. Never Ever Flush!!!!

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...KS59d2wH2Tklvg

Can you elaborate a little on the reason for this?

Evil Scotsman 04-04-2011 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcleve4911 (Post 622958)
Your right Scot.
The extension jamb is used to bring the window or door frame flush to the wall covering.

Extension jambs are offset a 1/4 - 3/16" to the window frame and to the casing. Never Ever Flush!!!!

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...KS59d2wH2Tklvg

Offset meaning to NOT have a seam?

tcleve4911 04-04-2011 09:29 AM

The offset merely gets you away from trying to create a flush condition that will ALWAYS have a visible seam in it.

Lots of trim and molding details will be always be offset.

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...fPEMUm3bfVVLlN

jomama45 04-04-2011 09:40 AM

I've seen window extensions w/o a reveal, and I have to agree with tcleve that a reveal "should" be standard practice. It add's a nice dimension to the window w/o having to use some form of attachment every 6" or so.

Willie T 04-04-2011 09:53 AM

4 Attachment(s)
Does a picture help?

tcleve4911 04-04-2011 09:55 AM

:thumbsup: I need to get back into SU

I was frustrated but I think I'll work on the 'component' aspect....

Willie T 04-04-2011 10:11 AM

Well, if you'll notice, they aren't very accurate windows. I'm more of a 'quick sketch' guy... just like to get the ideas across.

Evil Scotsman 04-04-2011 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 623014)
Does a picture help?

The semi green is the jamb extension offset? Yes if I am correct that does help! Thanks

Willie T 04-04-2011 10:31 AM

Our monitors might show colors differently. The glass is blue, the window rail and frame are dark brown, the extension is corkboard colored, and the casing is flakeboard colored.

Evil Scotsman 04-04-2011 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 623065)
Our monitors might show colors differently. The glass is blue, the window rail and frame are dark brown, the extension is corkboard colored, and the casing is flakeboard colored.

I am referring to the corkboard color then?!
:whistling2:

Willie T 04-04-2011 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Evil Scotsman (Post 623067)
I am referring to the corkboard color then?!
:whistling2:

Right. :thumbsup:

The original intent of adding a revealed offset was, of course, to keep the seam from being so danged difficult to keep tight, but also to alleviate the problem of the trim boards tending to warp forward and back. With a reveal, the slight movement isn't noticable, and there is also a corner crease into which to bed caulk.

FYI --- The term Moulding comes from the fact that long before we began using decoratively carved wood this way, the edges of doors and windows were actually 'moulded' with plaster. Years later, wood strips were cut to simulate this plaster edging.

Evil Scotsman 04-04-2011 10:36 AM

So you could actually build a box and insert to cover the entire inside (leaving no seam) OR run off of what you have and cut pieces to bring it out and offset:?

tcleve4911 04-04-2011 10:37 AM

Willie.......you edited your pic and made it more confusing.

To Evil and me anyway.......

Do you get it Evil ?


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