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Old 08-05-2011, 05:31 AM   #1
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New Member Into and Questions Regarding Residing Effort


Hello all,

I've been scouring the interwebs recently for information about residing my house. Many of my searches seem to lead me here, so I've been spelunking around in the archives and have really enjoyed reading some of the excellent posts about so many topics. Thank you.

So my long story...

I am thinking about residing.

My masonite is coming up on 30 years old now and I'm weighing the costs of a professional paint job and a DIY reside. I would like to move to fiber cement and I think I can tackle the house a section at a time (our house has very few long straight walls) but I've got some questions about sheathing.

As I hinted at earlier, the house was built in the mid 80's, and we live in the deep south (Georgia) which is a bad combination I'm afraid. Our current wall structure is

Sheetrock->2x4->Dow Blue Poly Board of some kind->Masonite siding.

(I'm not 100% but I'm almost sure there is no internal vapor barrier)

So I'm thinking that I'd like to upgrade the sheathing but I'm not 100% sure on the options. The more I read, the more I'm confused.

So, What are the options? Some random thoughts / observations so far:

1.)I'm not sure I want to take on the task of re-trimming all the windows and doors to accommodate a thicker wall structure.

2.)The house could use a little shoring up, it does seem a bit rickety at times which I've heard is common with foam sheathing but I'm not sure.

3.)Money is not such a huge issue since I'm doing it myself and hopefully a little at a time.

4.)Definitely see the value in a house wrap but not sure if it's appropriate (or necessary) for foam board.

5.)I'm very interested in the nail base insulation panels that are coming out but many of them seem to be strictly for roofing applications, and again, that would add at least an 3/4" to my wall thickness.

6.)I'm also concerned about the lack of a vapor barrier behind the drywall. Obviously not something to address with the reside, but I'm wondering if it affects the choices available to me.

Anyway, many many thanks for anyone who has made it through this (very) long post. I would welcome any and all suggestions or nudges in the right direction.


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Old 08-05-2011, 06:55 AM   #2
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Hardi can be installed over the blue foam. Not an easy install, especially if it is 1" thick. You may have trouble removing the old siding and not damaging the foam. If money is not a problem, you could remove the foam, install osb or plywood of the same thickness, install a weather resistant barrier, properly tape all windows, and then install the siding. I would start on a small section and see what you are dealing with before getting all gung ho. Hardi has a bit of a learning curve and requires special tools and also major dust protection.

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Old 08-05-2011, 07:18 AM   #3
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I agree with 6810 but will add that you really need to replace all the trim in order to do this properly.

Adding the osb will go a long way towards tightening up your “rickety” house.
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:28 AM   #4
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I agree, if you are gonna do it, do it right.

Take it back to the studs and put osb sheathing and tyvek, then Hardi. Practice with some Hardi before you have all of your siding torn off, you may hate life when you see how Hardi is to work with and a sidingless house is a bad time to learn that.
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:36 AM   #5
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Thanks for the tips all.

Taking it down to studs is probably my current thinking actually. I'm pretty sure I'll be able to upgrade the insulation in the stud cavities while I've got the siding and sheathing off. The biggest mystery is what to use for sheathing.

Sounds like OSB or CDX is the way to go in this case and just live without the extra R value the foam gives is this correct?

kwikfishron - Why replace all the trim? Just to seat the Tyvek properly?

Broughton - Thanks, yes, I'm planning on doing a small section first before ripping off all the masonite

6810 - Thanks, I've done a lot of DIY so I know what I'm getting into here. Also have a pretty well stocked wood shop for dealing with wild cards (not hardie boards but custom trim, etc.)

If I do go to stud, what's the best way to insulate the interior walls from the outside?
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:43 AM   #6
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Where do you live?
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:46 AM   #7
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Where do you live?
Atlanta Area.
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:52 AM   #8
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Well I'll tell you what is standard in Texas.

When you get to the studs you can replace the insulation between them and then put osb sheathing and tyvek. Osb adds some thermal protection and the climate you are in doesn't need extreme measures it doesn't seem like.

So osb and fiberglass insulation to answer your questions. Those would be my suggestions but wait for others, they may feel it is worth it to add more layers.
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:55 AM   #9
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Well I'll tell you what is standard in Texas.

When you get to the studs you can replace the insulation between them and then put osb sheathing and tyvek. Osb adds some thermal protection and the climate you are in doesn't need extreme measures it doesn't seem like.

So osb and fiberglass insulation to answer your questions. Those would be my suggestions but wait for others, they may feel it is worth it to add more layers.
Many thanks for taking the time. This was kind of my default approach but the more I read, the more confused I get

We can get into the 20's and 30's for a stretch now and again during the winter but mostly its 40+ so pretty mild. The summers on the other hand...
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Old 08-05-2011, 08:01 AM   #10
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kwikfishron - Why replace all the trim? Just to seat the Tyvek properly?
How else are you going to sheet the walls?
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Old 08-05-2011, 08:03 AM   #11
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How else are you going to sheet the walls?
Thanks. Your question actually answers one of mine.
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Old 08-06-2011, 09:03 PM   #12
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But you DO need electric shears for cutting the hardieboard. They've come down in cost a lot though the cheapest ones are exactly that. Otherwise you create way too much dust. And a real OSEA respirator is not a fun thing to wear for hours on end.

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