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Old 01-13-2010, 03:05 PM   #1
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Mould


I have some mould on:
  1. (Inside of property) Brick wall
  2. Behind back door to property
How can I remove this mould and make sure it doesn't return?

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Old 01-13-2010, 03:24 PM   #2
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Mould


TSP and a brush will probably remove it.

To make sure it doesn't come back you need to prevent the relative humidity from reaching 80%. One cause of high humidity inside is turning down the heat in the evening. If it's outside, then make sure air can circulate (no bushes, etc).

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Old 01-13-2010, 03:29 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by pyper View Post
TSP and a brush will probably remove it.

To make sure it doesn't come back you need to prevent the relative humidity from reaching 80%. One cause of high humidity inside is turning down the heat in the evening. If it's outside, then make sure air can circulate (no bushes, etc).
The brick wall is indoors in a cubbyhole / cupboard. I painted the brick wall in December just after I purchased the property.
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Old 01-13-2010, 04:16 PM   #4
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Mould


Have you got cavity walls or 9 inch solid?
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Old 01-14-2010, 01:50 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by stuart45 View Post
Have you got cavity walls or 9 inch solid?
9 inch solid
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Old 01-14-2010, 05:58 AM   #6
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9 inch walls are more prone to penetrating damp and condensation than cavity walls. You need to reduce the humidity. Try putting an air brick in the cupboard. Have you got extractor fans in the kitchen and bathroom?
Using thermal plasterboard with dot and dab on the walls can also help.
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:13 AM   #7
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Brick is porous. You sealed the surface with the paint. No moisture cannot be released. To clean mold use 50% bleach and 50% water. To keep mold out the wall must be warm and relative humidity under 85%. To be health RH should be under 50%. So get a dehumidifier to resolve your issues.
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:24 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
Brick is porous. You sealed the surface with the paint. No moisture cannot be released. To clean mold use 50% bleach and 50% water. To keep mold out the wall must be warm and relative humidity under 85%. To be health RH should be under 50%. So get a dehumidifier to resolve your issues.
Thanks for the adivce. The mould is in a cubbyhole / cupboard and has no power point in the room. I guess I can kill two birds and one stone and put on in hallway, so that ht deals with the mould behind the main door?
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:27 AM   #9
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Moist air is getting behind there or there would not be mold. So a humidify will help control the excess moisture getting into this area.
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Old 01-14-2010, 08:58 AM   #10
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Mould


Got to kill the spores. I would call in a pro to look at this situation. You will spend a fortune trying to approach it as DIYer.
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Old 01-14-2010, 11:46 AM   #11
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Mould


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
To be health RH should be under 50%.
So that's what's wrong with the South! It's almost never that dry here.


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Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Got to kill the spores. I would call in a pro to look at this situation. You will spend a fortune trying to approach it as DIYer.
I know someone who called in a pro to look at a radically more advanced situation (a rotting bathroom). The pro (a certified Industrial Hygenist) told him to do it himself. His instructions were to use TSP (tri-sodium phosphate) to clean non-porous surfaces and remove and discard any porous surface. Framing had a hybrid soloution, but I don't remember what it was. Something about scrubbing it and painting it and keeping an eye on it, iirc.

The alleged dangers of mould are vastly over stated by many people. Mould spores are literally everywhere -- it's just a question of keeping them from taking over things we don't want them in.
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Old 01-14-2010, 12:43 PM   #12
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In the UK the comfort zone for the R/H is 40-70%. This can be difficult sometimes when it's 95% outside.
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:59 PM   #13
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In the UK the comfort zone for the R/H is 40-70%. This can be difficult sometimes when it's 95% outside.
I can only laugh when people in the UK want to compare relative comfort.

In August my typical overnight LOW temperature is higher than the record HIGH anywhere in Scotland. It's not just hot here, it's humid as well.
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Old 01-15-2010, 06:28 AM   #14
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To thrive, common household molds need three things, humidity at 60% or greater (.6 water), an organic food source (dirt and dust will do, as well as wood or paper), and temperatures from 40-110 degrees F. Use 10% bleach solution to clean and then thoroughly dry the area. Never exceed 10%. Greater concentrations create chlorine compounds that you don't want to breathe and are more dangerous than the mold. Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) will not only kill the mold, it will break it down to it's base components. Wipe up all the remaining debris and apply a sealer. Some of the base components that make up mold can be allergens to certain people.
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:48 AM   #15
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http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldcourse/index.html

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