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Old 06-30-2012, 07:20 AM   #16
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Massive Undertaking


Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
Here's how I do it, my 12 step program:
  1. Sit down and draw up a plan. This is useful for more than the obvious - it allows you do sit and doodle while looking really industrious. If you have some glasses nearby, put them on. You'll look smarter.
  2. Once you have the plan, use it to generate material lists. This impresses everyone who has no idea what you're doing and makes it look like you really are organized.
  3. Take your list to the store and buy your material. Bring it home and stage it so it looks like a real jobsite. You can wear a hardhat for added effect.
  4. Have lunch.
  5. After lunch, lay out the materials so you can get some idea how things will look and what other materials you may need. This also helps identify the tools you don't have and will need for the project. (You can take pictures at this point so you can show everyone what you did.)
  6. Once you've identified the rest of what you need, go out and buy the materials. Bring them home and stage them too. Then go online and spend hours shopping out the best tool prices and buy the tools you need.
  7. Have dinner.
  8. Go back to your project and take another look at it. You may find you need to make some adjustments in your drawings.
  9. Return to the drawing board and make sure you have everything just right.
  10. Take your new drawing and compare it to the actual project at hand.
  11. Imagine how it will all look when it's done. (You can pat yourself on the back at this point.)
  12. Grab a beer and turn on the tube. You've worked hard today and you've earned it.
BTW, your new tools won't be arriving immediately but you need to keep the job going. So tomorrow, stake out the next project you plan to do and follow steps 1-12 above.
Love it!

What is the age old saying, "God laughs at the plans we make?"


Last edited by user1007; 06-30-2012 at 07:22 AM.
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Old 06-30-2012, 09:21 AM   #17
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Massive Undertaking


Thanks to everyone or all of the replies. I didn't realize I had so many.

As far as the plumbing and roof, I'm going to pay someone to do those. The roof needs repair and I have a $3,500 quote from a few people. We have to hire someone to run the plumbing for the dishwasher, but all of the above will be me paying someone to do it, so I didn't add it to my to-do list.

That list was super funny because that's exactly what I do now. I heard telling people keeps you accountable, which is why I posted on the forum.

I have to run to Low's in about 45 minutes so I'm going to make my list right now. I'm hoping to get all of this done in 3 weeks. To be 100% honest, the one thing I dreaded was painting because I hate to paint by hand, so hopefully the sprayer will change that.

I've laid tile before so that won't take me long to do. However, I'm up in the air about the walk in shower. Should I hire someone for tub removal and just do the rest myself or attempt to remove the tub? That is the one thing that actually looks intimidating to me.

Any input would be nice.
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Old 06-30-2012, 05:06 PM   #18
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Massive Undertaking


I hope you do not end up regretting your sprayer decision. I painted high end antique properties and unless the homes were empty seldom went that direction. It may seem attractive and fast but do not underestimate the time it will take to prep, tape and mask absolutely everything you do not want little spray dots on. You are probably going to have to back roll and touch up anyhow so you will not be escaping some hand work. And please don't forget to turn your HVAC system off while spraying. Of course be safe and wear an aspirator.

You seem handy so I would not be intimidated about doing the bath demo and tub removal yourself. Be sure and line up someone to haul it away! Unless it is a antique clawfoot or something unique you want to use elsewhere it has no value. Don't be afraid to bust it up if it is easier. Safety goggles please.

I will warn to expect possible surprises to what might be hiding once removed in terms of needed subfloor enhancements and so forth. I guess I am like you in your adversion to hand painting: I love to paint but can but do not like working with pipe wrenches so I would call a plumber for your new plumbing set up. I put kids of some who did work for me through grad school so I know they cost but money well spent, IMO. I have always paid the sparkys well too.

You mention a goal of being done in three weeks? Do you have to pull permits for all this where you are? And are you subject to inspections? You might want to get on the inspector schedule at least tentative rather than waiting and finding they cannot get to you.
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Old 06-30-2012, 05:40 PM   #19
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Massive Undertaking


The tub removal isn't bad-just undo the overflow (usually can unscrew it) and unscrew the drain (you can buy a tool for this or needle nose pliers should work fine) with the tile and board off it should just lift out. Check out how the plumbing will line up with the new tub, or have your plumber do it. Same if it needs a new stringer height, mixer valve, etc.

A sprayer is nice in an empty house, however don't underestimate the amount of time you will need to mask (and money for tape and poly, it does add up) also it does take a bit of practice. You may want to prime it out and do the ceilings with the sprayer, and see how comfortable you are. I have some experience using them for large ceiling areas in the past and find it much easier. However make sure the room is completely empty as you will be going back and fourth looking at the ceiling, and you don't want to stop and start your painting midway while tripping around something.

Last edited by chrisBC; 06-30-2012 at 05:47 PM.
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Old 06-30-2012, 11:10 PM   #20
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Massive Undertaking


"Massive Undertaking"? Yea....ok....tell you what....I'll trade 'undertakings'....for a hint, clink on the link in my signature.....

But I can relate to the motivation part.....We poured concrete July 15th of last year....and I still don't have the roof on the addition.....oh, and I'm doing ALL the work myself....

Best advice above....one task at a time....the best way to loose motivation is start 10 projects and not feel like your getting anything done....

I do personal rewards.....I push myself to finish one task...then reward myself with a beer (or Rum and Diet Pepsi).....easy to tell how much I get accomplished...just look at the pile of beer cans....
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Old 07-01-2012, 12:40 AM   #21
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Massive Undertaking


Massive undertakings?? Find the German House Rebuild and the guy in BC, on the island. Those are massive undertakings!
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Old 07-01-2012, 10:38 AM   #22
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Massive Undertaking


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
I hope you do not end up regretting your sprayer decision. I painted high end antique properties and unless the homes were empty seldom went that direction. It may seem attractive and fast but do not underestimate the time it will take to prep, tape and mask absolutely everything you do not want little spray dots on. You are probably going to have to back roll and touch up anyhow so you will not be escaping some hand work. And please don't forget to turn your HVAC system off while spraying. Of course be safe and wear an aspirator.
Thanks for the advice. I was referring to the actual painting process and using the roller. I've painted plenty of times, so the taping isn't a big deal for me, I just hate to do it.


Quote:
You seem handy so I would not be intimidated about doing the bath demo and tub removal yourself. Be sure and line up someone to haul it away! Unless it is a antique clawfoot or something unique you want to use elsewhere it has no value. Don't be afraid to bust it up if it is easier. Safety goggles please.
I'm probably just going to have a plumber do it or a contractor, but I'm not touching it.

Quote:
I will warn to expect possible surprises to what might be hiding once removed in terms of needed subfloor enhancements and so forth. I guess I am like you in your adversion to hand painting: I love to paint but can but do not like working with pipe wrenches so I would call a plumber for your new plumbing set up. I put kids of some who did work for me through grad school so I know they cost but money well spent, IMO. I have always paid the sparkys well too.

You mention a goal of being done in three weeks? Do you have to pull permits for all this where you are? And are you subject to inspections? You might want to get on the inspector schedule at least tentative rather than waiting and finding they cannot get to you.
So far, the only thing I'd possibly need a permit for is changing the tub into a shower. Good thinking though. I'll call around tomorrow and see if I can find out.
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Old 07-01-2012, 11:23 AM   #23
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Massive Undertaking


One place I lived you needed a permit for just about everything.
If it wasn't just cosmetic you needed a permit.
Heck I heard you even needed a permit for installing drapes.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:26 AM   #24
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Massive Undertaking


Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
Here's how I do it, my 12 step program:
  1. Sit down and draw up a plan. This is useful for more than the obvious - it allows you do sit and doodle while looking really industrious. If you have some glasses nearby, put them on. You'll look smarter.
  2. Once you have the plan, use it to generate material lists. This impresses everyone who has no idea what you're doing and makes it look like you really are organized.
  3. Take your list to the store and buy your material. Bring it home and stage it so it looks like a real jobsite. You can wear a hardhat for added effect.
  4. Have lunch.
  5. After lunch, lay out the materials so you can get some idea how things will look and what other materials you may need. This also helps identify the tools you don't have and will need for the project. (You can take pictures at this point so you can show everyone what you did.)
  6. Once you've identified the rest of what you need, go out and buy the materials. Bring them home and stage them too. Then go online and spend hours shopping out the best tool prices and buy the tools you need.
  7. Have dinner.
  8. Go back to your project and take another look at it. You may find you need to make some adjustments in your drawings.
  9. Return to the drawing board and make sure you have everything just right.
  10. Take your new drawing and compare it to the actual project at hand.
  11. Imagine how it will all look when it's done. (You can pat yourself on the back at this point.)
  12. Grab a beer and turn on the tube. You've worked hard today and you've earned it.
BTW, your new tools won't be arriving immediately but you need to keep the job going. So tomorrow, stake out the next project you plan to do and follow steps 1-12 above.
That is a great starting point. You always need a good plan and of course a beer after a day of hard work.

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