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Old 10-16-2007, 07:13 PM   #1
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Masonite garage door repair


We have a masonite / hardboard garage door. we selected it because it has a wood-grain appearance. We primed and painted it with a solid color acrylic stain, and it has worn well. However, last winter a bit of snow and ice built up near the bottom. The moisture or frost caused a 3" x 4" patch of the masonite to peel away. Every effort i've made to touch it up has failed. I've primed it, painted it, tried wood dough filler, talked with the guy at the paint store. Whatever I've applied eventually falls off with a bit more of the masonite. Short of buying a whole new door panel (which I cannot afford), is there something I can do to repair the spot? Many thanks for any suggestions.

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Old 10-17-2007, 04:33 PM   #2
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Masonite garage door repair


From you description it would appear the surrounding area of the hole is not up to holding onto the repair and just breaking away. You stated the hole is getting bigger with each repair. I would recommend saving your money on the repairs and replace the panel. However I do have a couple other ideas for you. First one is simple but will give a somewhat better appearance the a hole. Cut a nice rectangle or square patch of thin metal or other material significantly larger then the whole and glue and screw it on the surface to solid material away from the hole. Other wise try and make a spacer to support the patch from the back face of the door you could fasten a section cut to fit inside the hole and screw it from the backside spacing it slightly under the surface of the front so then you could again try your putty to smooth it but not only relying on the surrounding surface of the hole to hold on to is because the patch would be supported from the back side.

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Old 10-17-2007, 08:34 PM   #3
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Masonite garage door repair


thank you.
not sure about using thin metal.
but i like your idea of securing a filler piece into the chipped area from the back side. I'll give it a try. perhaps i can contour it to make it fit in without looking like a patch.

someone else has suggested using Bondo or Bondex (whatever it is called)...the stuff they use for automobile body work. but i'm working with masonite, which is more like layers of paper than layers of steel.

if i wind up having to buy a new panel, it will mean a 2' x 9' panel. that would be a bit costly, compared to continuing to rack my brain until i find a way to patch a 3" depression...one of those things that will keep me awake until i discover the effective repair. you'd think someone from the manufacturer would know of a quick 'n' dirty repair kit.

appreciate your thoughts.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:06 PM   #4
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Masonite garage door repair


You probably can sand and shape Bondo easier then the wood puddy / wood dough but it would have had the same problem breaking off. But if you get the support from the back side it may be worth a try.

Manufacture would most likely prefer to sell you a new door.
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Old 10-18-2007, 05:41 PM   #5
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Masonite garage door repair


You're right. I've checked with the distributor: $300+/- for a new panel installed. And, the manufacturer confirms that hardboard is pretty much paper (fibers held together with resins...which is partly why Masonite is involved in settling a class action lawsuit).

Soooo, if I am going to have to spend that much, I might as well try your suggestion first. I checked with "the helpful hardware man," and he, too, suggested not under-estimating what Bondo can do. The game plan is first to use a Minwax wood hardener, and then an all-purpose filler, which he has found works as well as (if not better than) Bondo on all of his projects.

If that fails, Plan B is to try an epoxy with a wood veneer to cover the patched area.

Will let you know how it all turns out...probably by postcard from the poor-house by the time i'm done.

Thanks again for your input.
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