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-   -   Looking for a DIY tutor for myself (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/looking-diy-tutor-myself-156855/)

groundup 09-15-2012 08:09 AM

Looking for a DIY tutor for myself
 
Hello everyone,

I am looking for a local individual that can tutor me in construction/handyman type things. I have an objective centered curriculum that I am going through on my own and I just need someone who is good at carpentry to assist me with it. I will pay $20 an hour for the teachings. I am located in Honolulu on O'ahu, I really hope someone can help me out with this. Mahalo!

groundup

joecaption 09-15-2012 08:23 AM

This is not the local help wanted ads.
Might want to try your Craigs List, pick up some DIY books, just asking your questions on boards like this should be able to get you through just about any job.

groundup 09-15-2012 12:18 PM

@Joe - Even with no previous experience, I should be able to get through anything you think? There are a number of things that I would like to build/get started working on but I guess I just get super nervous about this type of stuff since I have no background in anything working with my hands.

One of the big things I would like to do is build a small house (~600 sq feet) all by myself. I should be able to acquire at least a small portion of land and that way I would be only paying the cost of the building materials. The cost per square foot to build a house here in Honolulu ranges from about $150 sq ft and up. So, I was thinking that if I do everything myself then I should be able to cut that in half to about $75 sq ft for a total of about $45,000. Your thoughts?

http://www.byoh.com/stepbystep.htm <- I've been perusing this link a lot.

mae-ling 09-15-2012 10:00 PM

Good training for building a house is building a finished garage or shed first, lots of the skill apply.

Maybe hire a carpenter and work along side him? Might cost you more than $20/hr, well around here it would

groundup 09-16-2012 01:09 AM

@mae-ling - I asked around at work today and there is, in fact, someone in our maintenance department that has his own business and is actively looking for helpers. The person I spoke with said he will pass my info along to him and the owner will contact me if he's interested. I was told that I don't need any previous experience and that he'll teach me what I need to know.

My issue with this is that I have a set list of objectives that I need to get done. I want to go through them as quickly as possible so as not to waste too much time. I may just end up hiring a handyman to teach me as you suggested even though it may be pretty expensive. I'll try my local community college to see if anyone is interested first though.

joecaption 09-16-2012 08:32 AM

Here's some ideas on some tiny cottages.

PoleCat 09-16-2012 09:11 AM

If your only motivation is to save money then you are heading the wrong direction. The investment in tools will be significant. Learn as you go is also a very slow process. You may wind up getting in a mess and have to bring in some hired guns anyway to bail you out. Some operations are next to impossible for a single person to carry out too.

user1007 09-16-2012 09:57 AM

Don't forget permits and inspections needed! And the inspector is going to be especially diligent with a newcomer. And you may not be able to do some things yourself.

Why not do some work for Habitat for Humanity and donate the $20/hour to the cause? They put up structures in record time and you would work next to some qualified people?

You cannot rush all of this. Much of learning trade skills is becoming proficient through nothing more than doing them repetitively. You will likely find there are things you cannot master in time to meet your schedule.

And why not take a course at the community college where you could try things in a hands-on fashion. I believe most have construction overview sorts of courses or certificate programs?

Another thing to consider would be some sort of prefab house (and they do not have to look like ugly boxes) that have lots of the work factory done with the contractor left to finish them. One thing that frightens me is you getting a sticks and stones house framed and with a roof on it to survive your climate.

groundup 09-16-2012 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1010894)
And you may not be able to do some things yourself

That’s fine. I do not mind getting help with specific things that are either impractical or very difficult to do alone. You guys have a list of these things somewhere maybe?

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1010894)
Why not do some work for Habitat for Humanity and donate the $20/hour to the cause? They put up structures in record time and you would work next to some qualified people?

Now that is an excellent idea! Thank you very much for that great suggestion. I just looked at the Honolulu branch. I sent them an e-mail and I registered as well to volunteer. But, lo and behold, just about all of their volunteer spots are full. Argh! One of things I hate about living here, so darn overcrowded that one can not even volunteer because no more space!

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1010894)
You cannot rush all of this. Much of learning trade skills is becoming proficient through nothing more than doing them repetitively. You will likely find there are things you cannot master in time to meet your schedule.

I did not mean to imply that I have a set time schedule per say. What I meant is that I just want to intially learn how to do it and then be able to put in the work repetitively on my own in my own free time. I totally agree that most, if not all work like this (construction, crafts, automotive, etc.) is just learning how to do it once and then just keep doing it until you are comfortable with it. That is why I wanted to do this idea in the first place, I just have to find some kind of way to learn it the first time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1010894)
And why not take a course at the community college where you could try things in a hands-on fashion. I believe most have construction overview sorts of courses or certificate programs?

I don’t think they let one move at their own pace. I tried this when I took a course about six years ago in a different subject matter. I wanted to progress much faster than the pace of the class. It did not work out at all, so I don’t bother with that anymore. Waste of time for the way I learn personally.

@joecaption - I don’t see anything...

@PoleCat - I don’t plan on building a conventional house really. Highly customized to be as self-sustaining as possible. Amish style. :)

Also, regarding the tools, I can rent them or possibly borrow them from someone I know hopefully.

notmrjohn 09-17-2012 05:56 PM

Don't let anybody discourage you ground, if it wasn't for the opportunity to buy tools lots of folks woudn't do any DIY. For instruction try your local community college, i taught wood working through them, a community extension course, not part of regular curriculum, at a commercial shop for a couple of years. also try local AARP retired guys needing some cash. As for a "learning" Some Carpenter's Locals have apprentices buils a play house, using "real" sometimes scaled down techniques as part of test, then auction it off for charity. You can keep yours, live in it while building your dream house.


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