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troyce1 12-26-2012 03:43 PM

Lead Dust in Older Home
 
We are getting towards the end of renovating our 1955 Rancher and I am having concerns about the possibility of lead dust. My wife is looking to probably start trying to have a baby in the next 6 months or so, and this is the main area of concern. Is the only thing you can really do is to carefully clean all dust etc?

Are there any special cleaners etc that especially good for dealing with this?

Thanks

Gymschu 12-26-2012 04:13 PM

Well it's probably a bit late to be testing for lead. Usually you want to test any painted surfaces BEFORE renovation begins. That's the biggest area of concern when it comes to lead.........PAINT. Any sanding will release the dust into the air where it can settle in furnace ductwork and almost any horizontal surfaces. Hopefully you didn't have to sand walls or woodwork and in that case you may be safe. If you did lots of sanding or removed old plaster, etc. you likely released lead into the air of your home. There are lead testing kits at most hardware/big box stores or you could contact your local lead abatement company and have them test for lead to be on the safe side.

md2lgyk 12-27-2012 07:16 AM

Let's hope you don't need to get into lead remediation ($$$$). But unlike the scam that is radon mitigation, lead dust is a serious hazard, expecially for children. If you test high, it absolutely MUST be removed.

OpieGoneBad 12-27-2012 10:32 AM

The info at the link below can answer your questions about lead based paint hazards and performing renovations on homes built prior to 1978. I'm not sure how accurate the test kits are that you can buy at the local hardware store, but they test for the presence of lead in dust only. Dust wipe samples are used only to insure proper clean up after renovations or paint stabilization is completed. You also could have testing done with an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) device. This type of testing can determine the presence of lead as well as the amount in multiple layers of paint on a surface.

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/docu...=DOC_11876.pdf

troyce1 12-27-2012 10:38 AM

Thanks for the information everyone. I tested the areas that were sanded and all the areas were safe except the front door which according to the test did contain lead. This has already unfortunately been sanded, so my wife are now cleaning the entire house as best we can at this point, while the living area does not have much furniture etc in it.

If anyone has any additional tips/info they would be appreciated.

joed 12-27-2012 11:04 AM

Don't forget the air ducts and furnace filter.

troyce1 12-27-2012 11:21 AM

@Joed - Thanks, my wife was already planning on getting them cleaned after we get done the remodel.

Does anyone have a dust test kit they could recommend so that I could spot check and determine the actual levels of lead in the dust. We have been keeping the place fairly clean already with daily cleanup since we are living here, but I would like to determine the actual levels if possible. The paint test came back right on the threshold of a positive, so I am hoping the levels are fairly low.

ToolSeeker 12-28-2012 08:01 AM

If your worried about the lead dust I would change the filters a couple times at least during the reno.

Duckweather 12-28-2012 09:05 AM

Even a small amount of lead is poisonous to children under 6. Since your work is almost done you can test any undisturbed paint elsewhere to determine if there was any lead paint. The test kit I use is for before the paint is disturbed. Testing afterwards is usually done by comparing to a CV card. Most all paint stores, and the big box stores sell lead swab test kits, and a CV card available from National Lead Information Center, 1-800-424-5323. take a utility knife and cut little crosscuts into the paint to the wood and dab a swab on it. If there is lead it turns pink or red. If you have it in any other room it was probably in the one you worked on.

Cleaning is done with a damp disposable cloth to pick up dust and chips, use once and dispose of all cloths in heavy plastic bag. Start at far end at the top of the room and work down, every vertical and horizontal surface, floors last. Work your way out of the room so you don't walk in cleaned area. Vacuum the entire room, top to bottom with a HEPA vacuum. Vacuum must have a beater bar for carpet. solid floors use a detergent with a wet mop, keep wash water with detergent separate from rinse water. Change rinse water often. Mop a second time with a new mop.

Cleaning verification; use a white light flashlight and examine every surface for any dust or paint chips. Wipe down with clean, wet, disposable cloth 40 sq ft max per cloth. compare each cloth to the CV card if it matches, or is lighter than, the color of the CV card that surface has passed. If darker, re clean and retest.

As a contractor there is a $32,500.00 fine for non compliance.

ToolSeeker 12-28-2012 09:20 AM

For the lead to be poisonous I think they have to eat it. And you are correct home owners can do any thing they want with it and it's alright but let a contractor step on the property and he is responsible for what someone else did 30 years ago. God Bless the EPA lets give them more power and send more companies to China.

Windows on Wash 12-28-2012 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1081156)
For the lead to be poisonous I think they have to eat it. And you are correct home owners can do any thing they want with it and it's alright but let a contractor step on the property and he is responsible for what someone else did 30 years ago. God Bless the EPA lets give them more power and send more companies to China.

It can be inhaled as well.

Did you ever test and ID whether or not you have lead? Just being built pre-1978 does not mean it has lead.

Duckweather 12-28-2012 02:15 PM

Lead dust is more easily absorbed into the blood than eating. very little can causes brain damage in younger children that may go untreated. This is from the Lead safety for renovation, repair, and painting training course manual

ToolSeeker 12-28-2012 02:42 PM

Wow a gov. agency I sure want to believe them.

noquacks 12-28-2012 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1081330)
Wow a gov. agency I sure want to believe them.

Gov agency or not, you could believe them, as there is a great body of evidence out there that lead dust is a haz. Absorbed into lungs' alveoli, then enter bloodstream to poison the body.

Although not the case here, also toxic is lead heated up THEN breathed in like in lead solder, lead autobody repair (older days, and with real antiques), lead heating in stained glass, etc

ToolSeeker 12-28-2012 04:53 PM

Yes in great quantities. I don't want to argue so you win.


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