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-   -   Lathe (http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/lathe-150232/)

seriouslydistur 07-14-2012 01:59 PM

Lathe
 
Is metal lathe and chicken wire the same thing? If not, will it still be ok to use chicken wire in a concrete kitchen floor or do I have to use the metal lathe?

DannyT 07-14-2012 02:03 PM

why not just use cement backerboard or ditra and tile it?

Daniel Holzman 07-14-2012 02:12 PM

A lathe is a device for turning metal or wood. Lath is a term for wire fabric often used as a substrate for plaster, especially in older houses. Welded wire fabric (wwf) is a term for the wire fabric often used as reinforcing for concrete slabs. Chicken wire is a term for thin wire fabric, usually twisted together, that is intended to contain chickens or similar fowl. So, I am guessing you want to know if it is ok to use chicken wire rather than welded wire fabric as reinforcing for your floor?

In most residential construction, no reinforcing wire is required. Since you did not indicate the thickness of the concrete, and you did not state whether the concrete floor is intended to be a reinforced structural element, I cannot tell you whether you need welded wire fabric, or conventional reinforcing steel, or whether chicken wire would be OK, or whether you need any reinforcing for that matter. Tell us the exact dimensions of the slab (including thickness), the exact structural role (if any) for the slab, and then we can discuss the options.

seriouslydistur 07-14-2012 02:15 PM

I absolutely love the look of concrete when its colored and polished. Can add things to it or mold things in it. Plus plans are to do the counter tops in concrete also. Have a small bathroom vanity done in concrete and it is beautiful and durable.

seriouslydistur 07-14-2012 02:33 PM

The kitchen flooring that is exposed without removing cabinets is 10x11. I can not tell for certain, at this time, what is under the (yes believe it) carpet so I am unable to answer to the exact thickness although I will guesstimate and say close to 1/4 to 3/8 inches. As far as structural role, same as any kitchen floor I would think, unless I am misunderstanding the question? LOL >> Mr Holzman, thanks for the lesson in the difference between everything!

seriouslydistur 07-14-2012 02:37 PM

Does it help to know that the kitchen sits over a root cellar and not on a slab or anything like that?

Daniel Holzman 07-14-2012 04:01 PM

OK, so you have a conventional kitchen floor, which means it is not structural. Specifically, the floor itself does not support any other structural members. So you could tile the floor, put down hardwood, vinyl flooring, anything that might work. I don't think I understand what you are planning, you want a concrete floor for your kitchen? Part of the problem with a concrete floor is that concrete is heavy, if the floor is too thick, the floor joists may not support it. But maybe you can go back to the beginning and tell us what is there right now, what you want to do, and why you want a concrete floor (if that is in fact what you want).

seriouslydistur 07-14-2012 05:06 PM

Very beginning. I'm a single girl and just bought a 130 year old farmhouse. For lack of better example it kind of reminds me of bungalow style. About 20 years ago the previous owners built on a garage, laundry room, breezeway and living room, added better steps to the old living room and turned the attic into a bedroom/bath suite. They also replaced the windows, put down carpet and put up some new drywall. Over all the renovations were not extensive to the original structure, which appears to be very sound. As with many old houses, nothing and I mean NOTHING, in this house is level. Oh, I don't know if this helps or not but, when the original house was built the floors were put down and the walls placed on top of them. I'm under the impression that really fixing the floors would cost probably more than the house is worth so I'm stuck with figuring out other ways to make it look better. One day I will probably build at another location on this land, but as for now this house is just not worth tearing down. So I was hoping to add my style without doing loads of structural renovations.

A few years ago I happened to see a house with predominately concrete floors. Just as beautiful as any marble or granite you could find and only a fraction of the cost. Later, I saw a commercial concrete floor with animal prints and roots and leaves etc. and I was blown away. So I was thinking this might well be the best option for my kitchen and bathrooms.

I could be wrong, but was thinking that not only would it look great after a good acid stain and/or what ever else I decided, but that it might also help level out the flooring. The reason I would start with kitchen is because the previous owners put carpet in it.:confused1:(who puts carpet in the kitchen?) The carpet appears to be glued to what looks like ?wood subfloor?

Thanks for helping out!!!

DesignPlanBuild 07-14-2012 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seriouslydistur
Very beginning. I'm a single girl and just bought a 130 year old farmhouse. For lack of better example it kind of reminds me of bungalow style. About 20 years ago the previous owners built on a garage, laundry room, breezeway and living room, added better steps to the old living room and turned the attic into a bedroom/bath suite. They also replaced the windows, put down carpet and put up some new drywall. Over all the renovations were not extensive to the original structure, which appears to be very sound. As with many old houses, nothing and I mean NOTHING, in this house is level. Oh, I don't know if this helps or not but, when the original house was built the floors were put down and the walls placed on top of them. I'm under the impression that really fixing the floors would cost probably more than the house is worth so I'm stuck with figuring out other ways to make it look better. One day I will probably build at another location on this land, but as for now this house is just not worth tearing down. So I was hoping to add my style without doing loads of structural renovations.

A few years ago I happened to see a house with predominately concrete floors. Just as beautiful as any marble or granite you could find and only a fraction of the cost. Later, I saw a commercial concrete floor with animal prints and roots and leaves etc. and I was blown away. So I was thinking this might well be the best option for my kitchen and bathrooms.

I could be wrong, but was thinking that not only would it look great after a good acid stain and/or what ever else I decided, but that it might also help level out the flooring. The reason I would start with kitchen is because the previous owners put carpet in it.:confused1:(who puts carpet in the kitchen?) The carpet appears to be glued to what looks like ?wood subfloor?

Thanks for helping out!!!

Great idea or concept, but unless those floor joists are heavily reinforced, or made of steel, I would not recommend a concrete floor.

mae-ling 07-14-2012 08:48 PM

If you have a wood joist floor system it may more than likely crack,
Would need to beef up floor, then concrete board I'm guessing.
Really look into this before proceeding, you could be very disappointed after a few weeks or months.


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